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02-22-04, 23:52
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Kunshan
02-27-04, 12:54
Hi Intransit,

I also have had some good, bad and ugly expereinces with Chinese GFs. I have to agree with you in that the Chinese girl is looking for something much different in her husband than a western girl, that is basically financial support. In the case of non-Chinese passport holders, your passport is also a valuable asset. No matter how much love there is, the money issue is always hanging in their minds.

Chinese girls are not money hungry, they are just living in a society that doesn't give them the same oppotunities as men. Therefore they need a man to make sure they and their familes will be OK.

Maybe this is changing in the big cities, but I would warn all foreign guys in China that when fkng around with Chinese girls, especially an unmarried girl under 28 that you need to have an escape from relationship "ejector seat" ready to go.

On the other hand, divorced women in their late 20s are often really just looking for fun (and sex), and these are in my opinion much more rewarding targets.

Also now that there are Chechen girls working at Maggies I try to remain better behaved there.

BlnkNameCruiser
03-02-04, 07:39
My Two Cents....
My feeling now is that some girls fall into the following categories:

1. "appreciative" of a guy who has his sh*t together.

2. Appreciative of how a Westerner treats them (or so they seem to believe that 99% of chinese men wont treat them well)

3. Some are in it for status and money that they imagine us expats have. (i don't know about you all, but I am not loaded, however I guess I have more than the average chinese gal. I have seen where they often live.

4. I have met some who are fresh out of a long relationship and they want me to be their alcohol. They drown themselves and forget their sorrows in the sack with me! -you know.. I just want to help!! ;-)

The reality is you all need to use some real serious gut instinct. If you can't walk into a street market, buy some things at the same price as a local, you probably have not refined your senses enough to weed out the wrong kind of girl. - Or if you dont care, you are ahppy to play with some snobby, money grubbbing shanghainese chick. That is fine, as long as you don't live in some dilusion that it is real love.

blanknamecruiser

Intransit
03-02-04, 08:13
Changshu and Blanky and other brothers,

I apologize that I deleted my original post from this board. I had it in the Beijing section, and it seemed a bit untoward when I re-read it. However, I should have left it in the Living in China section. I recreate it below at least in spirit if not in actual text.


Gents, the other night I had a deep discussion with a friend of mine at Maggie's. As we watched the pool balls roll to and fro, he told me that he intended to move back in with his longtime girlfriend, from whom he has lived apart for over a year now. His move is motivated not by thinking this woman is the greatest thing since sliced bread, but because he feels guilty that she is so depressed all the time that they're not together, that she's having a tough time at her job, etc, in other words numerous reasons that do not primarily relate to "I love this woman more than life itself and can't bear to imagine a future without her."

This woman has never given up her intentions to be with him, despite his moving out and his "active" life during their time apart. He even told me that he would marry her as long as he could still have some fun on the side or one or two weeks per year where he could travel alone.

I respect my friend and I respect his decision. I know what it's like to have history with someone and to care about them, even to love them, without wanting to be with them full-time.

What I want to emphasize here is that women in China play to win. Through a combination of guilt, history, occasional sex, and other tools, this woman undermined my friend's ability to enjoy his freedom, and has now gotten him to the point where he is willing to essentially give up his life to her in exchange for some occasional furtive fun. These women are focused on securing their future. That doesn't mean they don't love you, but it means they are after something specific and they fully intend to get it. They play hardball. Their eyes remain on the prize.

I have too many friends whose balls are resting in jars that their wives are holding onto, who have to ask permission to play on sports teams and to spend money that THEY, the men, earned. Fuck that. I'm all for equality, but I'm not for abuse.

Be careful, gentlemen. Chinese women are great girlfriends, but my experience and research shows they are shit wives. As soon as that wedding banquet ends, you are expected to be a leader, a provider, and a father. Your role as lover and friend is over. Don't forget that.

BlnkNameCruiser
03-02-04, 10:45
Intransit and others....
Wow... that is a little heavy but.... I think you are generally right.

The Chinese are extremely smart. If we lao wei's think we have them figured out, or we can out manuever, out smart, out anything.... we are right where they can get us.

Don't be so proud to deny that your girl is likely more shrewd than you.

There is a reason they survived endless bad abusive murderous governments.

There is a reason they are getting richer a hell of a lot faster than the rest of us.

Be smart. Marry if that is where your heart is, just make a few things clear.

1. You will NOT take them back to the states.
2. You do NOT have any money.
3. You do NOT want ANY kids.
(even if you do want these things, just test them)

Pretend you just lost your job. Stop spending money. Pretend every day you are out looking for a job. Change to a cheap ass apartment. See if she sticks it out. If you are too lazy to go through this trouble, you are going to pay dearly later. I sure as hell wouldnt be too lazy if the REST of my life was going to be spent with this woman.

just my 3rd cent.

blanknamecruiser

Intransit
03-03-04, 05:27
Blanky,

Interesting perspective, but I must ask one question--if we can assume they are at least as shrewd as we are, then would they fall for the "I don't have a job/don't have money/not taking you to my home country" ploy? And if we really do marry them because we love them, why would we want to do that?

Anyway Blanks, let me know next time you're in town, have met Tapioca and would like to meet the board's most senior poster.

BlnkNameCruiser
03-03-04, 06:49
Intransit,
I think you should stack the odds in your favor. Maybe they will not believe you at first, but keep it up. Tell me.. what is the worst that can happen?

She leaves you... Then you know it is not for real. If she doesn't care, only loves you and wants to stay with you, at least you have a little more assurance.

of course life has no guarantee. Just try.

Thanks for the invite. I hang with Tapioca all the time. He also tells me you are the King of Beijing. I would love to get together some time.

I'll PM you on my next trip to BJ.

blanknamecruiser

Intransit
03-03-04, 13:31
Blanky, good points again. You're right--if she takes a hike, then the interview process just became a lot easier, did it not?

Well, I'll settle for a Prince of Maggie's title for now...

BlnkNameCruiser
03-06-04, 12:54
I have been nailing a lot of freebies lately.
I have noticed clear difference. Not all girls are looking for a passport or money. As I know you know... I am ust reiterating since I am recently dating these girls.... and a lot of them at once I should add..

I seem to find that if I meet a sweet girl at a restaurant or something, you can bed them quickly if you are sincere with them, but they also will fall in love with you.

Some of these girls I am meeting by running an ad in a western magazine classisfieds. For the most part, one of the girls I met frmo this simply told me that she is out of an 8 year relationship. She wants to simply feel better.

We chat a little bit online, then I went to her home one night at 2am since we could not handle chatting and not seeing each other. Within 20 minutes we were in bed. I got a shot at night and a shot in the morning. She keeps in touch but is very mellow about everything.

there are really a lot of different kind of girls out there.

blanknamecruiser

BlnkNameCruiser
03-06-04, 12:56
By the way.. I am running an ad for married woman who want something on the side.

It may surprise you but I am getting alot of reply.

blanknamecruiser

China 69
03-08-04, 07:25
I have a job offer to work in Shenzhen at a high-tech company for 5000 RMB/month for 20 hours a week, which would be about 1/10 of my USA electrical engineer salary. I can speak enough chinese to get by ok on. How crazy would it be for me to move there, and does anyone know what would be my chances to score a higher paying job somewhere else in Shenzhen or elsewhere in China? Also how much does a decent apartment in Shenzhen cost? Thanks for any info. If I move there I think I will have many experiences to contribute to this website.

BlnkNameCruiser
03-09-04, 09:32
Damn dude.... my rent is more than that. I think if you can fill the rest of the time teaching english or something, then you probably have a good chance to survive.
I have seen some teaching jobs pay 1,500 per month full time plus free apartment.

blanknamecruiser

Swedster
03-09-04, 09:49
Hello,

I'm going to Guangzhou region to teach english. Can anyone tell me about the action in the surrounding areas. Also, would it be easy to get freebis, like from students etc.

OldAsiaHand
03-09-04, 11:31
China 69,

I don't know what decent means to you, but you can figure RMB2k+ for anything even close to livable. Nicer places can go as much as 6k for 2-3 bedrooms. Detached villas in Shekou can be as much as 40k. So, take your pick.

5,000RMB is a local salary. In my last expat job, I paid a local guy with 3 years experience that much. Native English teachers in Shenzhen make around 7-8k with housing per month for about the same hours.

Real expat jobs are hard to come by these days as most companies would like to localize as many positions as possible. Most expats have been sent over with the company from the West rather than hired in China.

If you are looking to broaden your horizon by living in China, it may be worthwhile. If you are looking to advance your career or make a lot of money, forget about it.

Just my POV.

OAH

Mao Dun
03-09-04, 17:00
China 69:

I don't know if the job you're referring to does, but a lot of jobs throw in an apartment (OAH probably knows more about this than I do). I remember seeing a lot of ads for English teaching jobs that provide housing, although it may be beneath a "decent" standard as far as you're concerned.

I've heard it's harder and harder for expats to get jobs here for the reasons OAH cites. On the other hand, I see a lot of graduates from the American university I teach at landing lucrative "consulting" jobs with virtually no experience (perhaps a summer internship in the states before), so it seems like it's easier to work into a job from outside China than look for one here.

China 69
03-11-04, 07:28
The company that offered me a job was a fiber optics company. I would be doing engineering work not teaching english. They offered 5000RMB/month, I countered with only working 20 hours per week, they said ok. 5000 is pretty low though. For that little money I might as well not work, just go and travel around and practice my chinese and hit on girls as a full-time job.

Not interested in teaching english, done that before, don't want to do it again. I loved living in Sichuan though so maybe I'll go back there.

Mao Dun
03-14-04, 02:54
I figured it wasn't an English teaching job; I was just giving an example. But RMB5000 sounds very low for an engineering job, even part time.

Ear Muff Diver
03-14-04, 19:12
I am currently negotiating with my ex US company for a position in Shanghai. As I understand, the top income tax rate is an overwhelming 45% in China ! However, I have read in some forums that for independant contractors/consultants, the income tax rate is a flat 20%.

Can anyone help me understand the income tax situation for an ex-pat from the US, working in China as an independant consultant ? Or provide any guidance or advice ?

Thank you.

BlnkNameCruiser
03-16-04, 08:31
Ear Muff,
I never met any Expat in China that is paying any tax.
I have seen in tax books that the china tax rate is 36%.

Regardless, I dont know anyone who pays it.

Everyone just gets money wired to them and that is all that happens. Some people have the account in US, some in HK, some in China.

Just dont worry abou it. Get the money. I am sure you wont have to pay anything unless you are employed in china by a chinese company.

blanknamecruiser

New Zhoujie
03-16-04, 08:46
EMD,

Regarding Taxation in China: a couple of options that vary in terms of legailty and cost.

1) Most "Expats" with a HQ based in Hong Kong will do a split contract. Many people who also spilt their time between HK and South China will also use this approach. What this means is that you will recieve around 80%-85% of your pay in HK$ through a HK bank. This WILL be taxable in HK but as the top rate is around 17% it is not too bad. The other 15% will be paid through your PRC branch in RMB. Of couse you will also pay the tax for this.

The obvious advantage to this is that the majority of your income is taxed at the lower rate. (if u are a yank, then u are also exempt from paying US tax on the fist 85K you earn overseas). You also will be able to get a HK ID through your work visa which makes crossing the border easier as well.

The downside is that my accountant has confirmed that this structure is 100% ILLegal for those working in PRC for more than 183 days. As of now, the PRC Border Control and Tax computers do NOT talk to each other the same way that they do in Hong Kong, but one never knows how long this will last. That said many of us do use this.

2) Tax equalization
If option one is a no go ask your company about tax equalization. This is where your company will make up the difference between the taxes you pay in your home country and PRC. Your HR should undertsand the concept.

Finnaly, per last post, very very few expats are paying full PRC tax. So make sure your management knows the score.

Good Luck!

New Zhoujie
03-16-04, 08:52
EMD,

One more point:

If you are here as an independent contractor then I advise you to follow BNC advice and set up a bank account in HK ( its easy to do). HSBC is OK and they have branches in all the majot cities.

But I would also try to see how much support your company will give you in terms of arranging visas, and residence/employment permits.

Feel free to PM me if you need more details as I have been in same situation before.

Cheers

NZJ

OldAsiaHand
03-16-04, 11:51
Ear Muff Diver,

The Chinese income tax law can be a bit tricky depending on your employment status, time in the country per year, etc. The 45% applies to monthly salary over RMB100k or 12kUS$. It depends on how far your company is willing to go to lessen the tax burden as Blankie suggests. I suggest you contact a reputable US accounting firm with a presence in China for advise on the most current situation. They can give you details based on your specific circumstances.

OAH

Apac Boy
03-16-04, 19:32
Woohoo!!! Tapioca doesn't pay taxes!!! oh wait...no job = no income = 36% of nothing is nothing.

Living in China's still fun though. Freebies are now more out of necessity than accomplishment. And yeah, I can def. tell you a lot of these girls are not in it for the money cause they know I'm unemployed from the get go.

One advice for freebies, stock up on your DVD collection. Don't just buy good movies like "Spiderman" or "LOTR3" cause that's not going to bring any girls back....BUT... whole sets like Friends or Sex in the City....oh ohh...watch out. Don't know why but a lot chicks really dig that stuff. Oh, the object isn't to FINISH the series, you should aim to get all her clothes off before the 2nd episode starts.

Forget about showing Simpsons and South Park. The humor just doesn't convey as well when they translate it into Chinese.

I'm willing to do a commissioned report for a fee...help a brotha out.

tapioca

BlnkNameCruiser
03-17-04, 05:07
Tapioca,

yoo da man!
I wondered why your freebie round-up skills are so great.

blanknamecruiser

Ear Muff Diver
03-17-04, 07:53
BNK, NZ, Tapioca,

Thank you for your comments and advise. I am waiting for the formal work contract to be translated from Chinese to English, and which will give me a good opportunity to delve into details of how the company proposes to make its payments to me which will be in USD or Pounds Sterling.

One thing is clear that the company will not assist with tax levelling ; however, they will provide the necessary help with work permits/documentation requirements.
Must confess that am getting a little frustrated as the paper work is moving slower than anticipated! Once I have the paperwork, then I will be sure to take you guys up on your offer to guide me some more.

PS Any suggestions as to where I should look for an apartment? I would prefer to be in dowtown where the action is, but do not know the names of the areas.

Thanks

Three I
03-17-04, 16:46
You mean to tell me there is free sex in China!

BlnkNameCruiser
03-18-04, 09:07
Three X,

No.

Blanknamecruiser

Loafer
03-26-04, 07:48
On taxes:

It is not true that there is no expat in China who pays income tax. I do, and most of my friends do. And I know two people who got in trouble with the authorities because they had not payed or not payed in full. Both of them had to pay up the undeclared amounts. One of them also got fined, and was not allowed to leave the country until clearance from the tax authority.

It may not be the general situation that people get caught, but it does happen. If you plan to be in China for the long-term, try to negotiate as much of your compensation as you can on allowance basis. Many allowances are actually tax free. Otherwise don't mess with the authorities, and enjoy your life with the hopefully-not-so-bad net of your expat salary.

BlnkNameCruiser
03-26-04, 09:05
loafer
that is good balanced advice.
in any case, you can do it but it is a risk.
and also you are right. there are housing alloowances etc... use them as best you can.

I use one. I get 15,000 for housing allowance, and I pay 6,000 for rent. I have receipts for 15,000 to turn in.

blanknamecruiser

Ear Muff Diver
03-27-04, 08:53
Loafer, BNC,

I intend to pay my Chinese taxes.

One question that is still open and I cannot seem to get an answer on from anyone here in the US is: "Is it true that for independant consultants, there is a flat 20% income tax rate in China?"

I read about this on a Shanghai forum, but have not been able to verify. Do you know of a good Shanghai based Tax person who could advise me?

PS. I am now slated to move to Shanghai around May 1st ; perhaps too old to monger, but I am sure that BNC will pass some of his discarded conquests a' la Gym Girl, my way!

DavidC
03-27-04, 19:49
hey EMD
may I ask what you are doing in shanghai and around how much the pay is? I've been trying to get over to China for the last 2 years, but my company has been slicing budgets left and right so there goes my chance, have to start looking elsewhere now..

Loafer
03-28-04, 07:28
Ear Muff Diver:

I believe there is a 20% withholding tax for consultants who do not have a registered company in China, and therefore cannot issue (proper) Chinese receipts. But I think the 20% are only charged when you try to change your RMB revenues into foreign currency, as it is assumed that the services are rendered by an overseas company. If you do not exchange, you might (or might not) get away with it, but I guess that would be considered tax evasion.

Tax consultants are all over the place in Shanghai, and - in my experience - most of them are willing to help out a newcomer with some advice free of charge. Just don't overdo it, and give some payback by buying them a beer or a babe. In the past this has worked even with the big firms.

Perhaps someone else here might be able to give you a more specific lead.

Ear Muff Diver
03-28-04, 09:12
Loafer,

Thank you for the tips. Will seek out a tax consultant once I get there in May.

Davidc,

I would rather not go into details of what I will be doing in Shanghai. Suffice it to say that I will be consulting to a large multinational computer company and my income would be commensurate with what I have been making in the US -

BlnkNameCruiser
03-31-04, 16:43
Well.. The perfect for this section happened to me today. Lai Lai, my (mostly) freebie who I have posted pics a long time ago, is a cute tall thin KTV quality girl, asked me to marry her today. DAMN!
oh well... not sure if this means the fun is over. We will see.

blanknamecruiser

Thirty Mins
04-01-04, 16:01
Regarding Taxation, China is beginning to crack down on all the foreigners / HKers / Taiwanese, etc. who are working in the country on business visitor ("F") visas and not paying taxes.

They are gradually building up their ability to check, for example they keep a count of how many days per year a person has been in China on an F visa. Generally, once a person has been in China 183 days per year (even if technically on business trips from abroad), he/she should be paying Chinese taxes.

There have also been stories in media across the country about crackdowns on illegal foreign workers lately. Businesses can be fined 50,000 RMB for illegally employing a foreigner, and the foreign worker can be fined too (usually X,000 RMB).

Housing paid for by a company and company cars are nice tax-free income possibilities to keep in mind.

Ear Muff Diver
04-01-04, 21:14
Some input after posting so many questions!

Long Report about Taxes in China, but hope it helps others trying to decide moving to China.

As posted previously in this thread. I am a US citizen currently in discussions with a company based out of China for a contract to work for them in Shanghai. I have been having daily conversations with them regarding local taxes, as it is a topic dear to the hearts of all foriegners looking to work in China.

I thought that perhaps the following may be useful for anyone who is considering moving to the China.

I have taken all the information that the employer in China has provided after they consulted directly with the China Tax Bureau . I have no reason to doubt the data, but I am no tax expert, and will accept no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information. Please make sure that you do get the information verified by your tax consultant prior to making decisions or act upon the data below. Apologise for the length of the note. But hope it helps you wade through the tax questions. The data was provided to my employer by the China Tax Bureau on March 30, 2004. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PS. For US ex pats -Note it does not matter whether you are paid all of your income in RMB or US Dollars or any other currency, in or out of China; if you are a US citizen or a US resident alien , working in a foreign country this does not exclude you from filing US taxes, and being liable to pay taxes on your total worldwide income ! There are however several ways that you can reduce your US taxes (Foreign Earned income exclusion ( 80K), housing exclusion/deduction, foreign earned credits, educational allowances etc). For dertails see http://www.irs.ustreas.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p54.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Now for the China taxes for foreigners... I guess applicable to all foreign nationals working in China..

How to calculate your taxable income and the associated taxes.

1. Income tax is due monthly .

2. Allowances and deductions :

Personal allowance - 4000RMB per month irrespective of income

Foreign Tax Incentive - up to 35 % of base salary/month (excluding bonuses, incentives etc) the key words here is up to. The items covered are house rental costs, children's local education costs, and 2 round trip airfare to home base/year, only for the tax payer and not for the whole family ! To claim these allowances/incentives, you have to provide receipts to the tax authorities. If your company provides these type of benefits to you in your expat package, then you cannot take this Foreign Tax Incentive

3. There is an additional allowance that is based upon your total monthly taxable income. See table below at end of this posting.

Now to actually work on a real life situation ! To make it easier to follow, I wil use round numbers.

Example : Say the monthly base salary is 80000 RMB
The incentives and bonuses are 20000 RMB/month
Company does not pay housing allowance or home leave or children's education.
( if above paid in US Dollars, you have to convert to RMB at the official rate for tax purposes )

Base salary + bonus = 100000 ( 80000 base +20000)
Personal deduction = 4000 ( standard)
Taxable without other deductions= 96000

Foreign Incentive Maximum allowance = 35% of 80000 = 28,000
Note: 35% of base of 80,000 only

Suppose that monthly housing rental costs plus 2 round trip home leave tickets just for you ( not family ) , and children's educational costs come to 35% of your base. If not, calculate actual amount, and if below 35% of base,use that figure, and if above 35% of base use exact 35% of base.. In this example as the base is 80000, the 35% is 28000. I am going to assume that the acual expenses would be equal to or greater than 35% hence the figure 28000 is used. If now we continue the calculation..

Base salary +bonuses = 100000
Personal deduction = 4000 ( standard)
Taxable without other deductions= 96000
Foreign Tax incentive = 28000 ( use actual costs to max 35% of base salary)
Taxable income (96K-28K) = 68000
Tax from table below @ 35%= 23800

Additional allowance from
table below = 6375

Total Estimated taxes to be paid
each month = (23800-6375) 17425 RMB


Tax Table
-------------------------------------------------

Monthly Taxable Income less than RMB 500: 5%
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 500 to 2,000: 10% -25
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 2,000 to 5,000: 15% -125
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 5,000 to 20,000: 20% -375
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 20,000 to 40,000: 25% -1,375
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 40,000 to 60,000: 30% -3,375
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 60,000 to 80,000: 35% -6,375
Monthly Taxable Income RMB 80,000 to 100,000: 40% -10,375
Monthly Taxable Income more than RMB 100,000: 45% -15,375

There is a standard monthly Personal allowance of 4000RMB .

Intransit
04-02-04, 07:50
I don't believe this for a second. China isn't that organized. I just got my first one-year F visa after years of six-month ones. Good luck proving that I live here, I'm in and out so much, and good luck finding me even if they figure it out.

Superforce99
04-02-04, 09:11
I'm in the same boat as Intransit.

And, just like in the US, the more money you make the more likely you WON'T be paying anything in taxes. Also, the Chinese government's own figures show that less than 5% of the population are paying any kind of income tax. Just my experience...

Lucky888
04-03-04, 12:06
EMD --

Since you're a US person (i.e. "US person" in the tax sense of the term, as the IRS defines it), there are two things you probably already (or should) know:

If you are a US citizen, are are outside the US for 330 days in a calendar year, you don't owe any US tax. Key word is calendar year-- If you go outside US on Feb 7th 2004 and don't re-enter US until Nov. 14th, 2005, you will still owe US tax for 2004 and 2005....because you will have been in the US for more than 35 days in each of 2004 and 2005.

If you are outside the US for less than 330 days, you do have to pay US tax. If the US has a tax treaty with China (does anyone know?) you may be able to get your US tax reduced by the amount you pay abroad.

Having said all the above, I agree with Intransit and Johnny. However, if you work for a China company, then the gov't is that much more likely to find you evading taxes (since the Chinese company will have to report to Beijing what they pay you).

Papadum
04-05-04, 05:42
Hi guys:

Does any one know how to remit money from China back to a Canadian Bank?

Thanks!

Ear Muff Diver
04-05-04, 07:51
Lucky,

Just as a FYI, if you are out of the US for 330 days or more in a tax year, you still pay US taxes. However, you may be eligible to deduct some or all of the following on your US Fed taxes:

Foreign Earned income exclusion up to $ 80k
Foreign Tax credits for taxes you have to pay in a foreign country
Housing exclusion/deductions.

As a simple rule, if your earnings in China are less than US $ 80k/year, you will most probably not pay any US taxes If more than 80k, then you have to start taking advantage of the exclusions. You may still end up not paying any US taxes but this is not a certainty. BTW, if you use Turbo Tax, you can more or less figure out the tax implications.

I am stuck in that the company I will work for is a multinational US one and ultra conservative. They insist on withholding taxes for China!

Nomadic
04-06-04, 06:36
Shanghai expats:

My relo company is offering No 41 HengShan at $3,000/month. Its a 2 BR top floor, nice, French style :)

I know its steep rent, but the company pays it all and for now I cannot turn in a 3,000 invoice and rent for less (it goes directly from the relo company to Expenses...)

It's in the French concession accross from TGI and down the street from Bourbon St. Seems like a good location to me.

Does anyone have recommendations on this place or lived there before?

Cheers

F

OldAsiaHand
04-06-04, 15:17
EMD,

I am working as a part time consultant to a US company in China. After investigation by their finance dept people, they decided to put me on the payroll and pay the tax since I am living in China. I negotiated a net deal with them. As I understand from them, the 20% withholding tax only applies to companies providing a service or visitors to China. I believe if you spend more than 183 days per year in China, you must pay income tax here.

OAH

Ear Muff Diver
04-07-04, 08:52
OAH,

My company also explored the situation regarding taxes and came to the same conclusion. Payroll to deduct taxes, and very quarter after I submit receipts, relevant to Foreign Incentive relief, they will adjust next quarter's taxes.

BlnkNameCruiser
04-20-04, 09:34
Faguoren,
1. I would not live on that road. It is a bar street. I would visit, but not live.

2. $3000 is insane. I would save the company the money and ask for 1/2 the savings in pay.

blanknamecruiser

BlnkNameCruiser
04-20-04, 09:35
Papadum,
go to your bank, tell them you want to TT funds to Canada. bring your passport and bank book.

fill out a form, charge is like 200-300rmb usually.

blanknamecruiser

Apac Boy
04-22-04, 00:54
I disagree with Blankie...if Faguoren's apt is that really nice one directly across from TGI on Hengshan, it's a really nice place (at least from the outside). I am sure it is really nice inside too. $3K is expensive and I am sure u can find one for half that, but if u want to live it up, impress chinese girls, that's da place to be!

That place is like a 2 min. walk to the Hengshan subway station...Also, when u walk home at night, u get to pass by a lot of drunk girls just stumbling out of the bars, great time to pick em up and offer a place for them to "sober up".

tapioca

Crazy Guide
04-22-04, 03:29
Tap, you are right. I have checked the selling price on those and they are about US$4,500 per Sq. M. For a typical 2BR + 2 Bath of 166 Sq M, the selling price would be US$747,000.

WOW!

DG

BlnkNameCruiser
04-26-04, 03:23
Tapioca,
Who do you need to impress that will truly care about that place? If she gives a shit, then she aint true long term girlfriend material (unless you are one of those guys I see walking around with a chick who has one hand holding her boyfriend and the other lifting his wallet). If she aint a girlfriend then a few extra mao's will get you what you really want out of her.

Why waste your company money when you could give them a deal for a cheaper place, and pocket some of the difference for yourself?

Is anyone here SOOOOOO damn rich that you dont care about an extra 1-2k in your pocket per month?

$1,000usd can get you a very clean, high endbrand new, 130+sq foot place.

Why not keep some of the money for your pocket, and look like a hero by saving your company some money?

blanknamecruiser

Apac Boy
04-26-04, 15:56
Ok, if you can't pocket the difference, stay there.

If you want, you can come stay with me and Blankie because we have an AYI room for you. We will charge you only $1,000USD and write you a $2,000USD receipt. You pocket the difference and can hang with 2 kewl guys.

tapioca

Wild & Crazy
05-01-04, 13:43
Guys,

If you want to find a nice place to rent, try Eastern Manhatten on Wen-Ding Lu in Xue-Jia-Hui district. 2BD apt is around 8000rmb/month, it's quiet, luxury, and got a great gym + indoor, outdoor swimming poor and tennis court (hehe, I'm not the apt agent)

Swedster
05-02-04, 13:14
Hey guys,

I'm heading for GZ, I will be there for one year.

How do I go about obtaining a cell phone in China, is it hard? Do I need any specific documents?

Also, does anyone have any tips for Zhaoqing City?

Prince Leo
05-03-04, 18:04
Gettting a cellphone in China is pretty easy.

Goto one of the cellphone stores and buy a prepaid simm cards and inserted in to your cellphone and you are off. Do remember to change your phone frequency if you are from the US. It has to be a tri-band phone too.

If you don't have one, get a cheap one in the store for about 700-800 rmb. No ID require. But do test it before you leave the store.
For security and product quality, get one from the bigger and more legit shops.

For the best quality, I suggest getting the "ShenZhouXing" simm-card. It is the best, and most expensive card out there.

Dialing 12593 in front of the number that you are about to dial, saves you 25-40% on the call.

Leo

Mehra
05-04-04, 23:02
Folks.

Can anyone recommend a good "tailor shop" in Beijing city. I want to get some suits made & would like to hear from anyone who knows a good tailor that does quality work and has good material at a reasonable price.

Thanks in advance.

KirKanos
05-05-04, 17:19
You must be silly or stupid to pay RMB 700-800 for a prepaid card in China. RMB 200 gets you something really good with a number.

Rickyeoh99
05-06-04, 01:21
KirKanos,

I think he was referring to the price of a cheap handphone.

Prince Leo
05-06-04, 06:13
700-800 rmb is for cell phone, not for the prepaid phone card.

James Cook
05-10-04, 09:58
A SIM card is easy to get. Just get into a arbitrary cell phone store in the street to buy a CMCC card ( better signal quality) for 50RMB inculding 50RMB phone charge reserved. If you dwell in a city for more than several weeks, perfer the local card please. Do not choose chinese roaming card or global card which will cost much more every minute.

JC

Travel Dog
05-30-04, 16:38
OK. So after staying in Dong Guan, China about 50% of my time for 2 years. I decided to turn it into an investment and buy a condo here. But I figured I would only buy one if a bank would give me a loan sharing the risk. Well guess what? No problem. I put 20% down and 10 years at 4% for the rest. You can only easily do this with new construction projects. I highly recommend this for you guys on expense reports. Your company makes the payment and you end up with a house.

How much? New construction is more expensive that old places and price varies depending on location. My deal was 400,000 RMB purchase price 40,000 down and 3400/month for 10years. The condo was bare when purchased so the cost to finish out the 103 square meters including 2 baths, 3 bedrooms and kitchen was 80,000 RMB. High quality finish out. I would say 4 star. You can buy and finish out for much less but I wanted a nice place

A Fun Man
05-31-04, 22:47
About cell phone usage in China:

You can get a 3 band cell in the US and modified in China so that the cell phone can be used in both US and China. In this way, you only need to carry a SIM card for the US and a SIM card for China, instead of two cell phones. Mot V66 or Sony T610 will work in this case.

The use of a cell phone to make long distance or international call in China is very expansive. However, every provider will have a phone number for you to make IP phone call. Once you make IP phone call, your phone bill will be cut in half. You can call the help desk to get the phone for making IP call. Normally it is 5 digits, something like 17910, 17911, etc. Give a try and have fun.

Prince Leo
06-03-04, 02:26
The Motorola v400 is the quar-band phone that you can use all over the world. It has a speaker too. The clarity is not bad. My friends used it in China and Hong Kong during their vacation about a month ago. And they said it works pretty well in both places. I am going to try it during this coming winter during my trip back to China and HK. The only knock on this is that this phone eats up its battery pretty quickly. It only last for 3 day or so for a complete charge.

Gaolei
06-03-04, 16:22
Another Phone Alternative:

Get a t-mobile Tri-band phone so that you can be reached in 80+ countries. Your company or family just dials your US number and it rings you where ever you are. They have fixed price costs by country on their web page. In China, it is near $3.00 per minute, but your company can afford that if they want to be in the global market!

If you already have a Tri-band phone, get the latest upgrade phone from your phone company. I had a Motorola for 2 years and upgraded to a Sony for 50 bucks. I had T-mobile supply me with the unlock code for the Motorola. I use that phone for local, in-country calls at a cheap rate, while maintaining my international connection on the other phone. You just buy a sim-card in China as described elsewhere on this page.

If anything should happen to my Sony, I can use its Sim-card in the Motorola and I am back on t-Mobile so my company can reach me. You can do this with any company that uses the GSM standard and offers global calling.

Wicked SH
06-19-04, 02:14
Does anybody know what the SMTP server is for china mobile? I have a PDA phone and want to setup mail, but need to setup the SMTP server info for China Mobile so I can send outgoing mail.

Wicked in Shanghai

Travel Dog
06-20-04, 02:12
I use two phones. One for China & Hong Kong and one for the USA, but the T-Mobile Tri-band option sounds prettyy good. I spoke with a T-Mobile rep in Dallas and he told me if you sign a T-Mobile contract after 2 months they will unlock your Tri-band phone for free. After that you could switch to a much cheaper local SIM card an still only have one phone.

Kunshan
06-20-04, 08:39
If you are using your own email address then shouldn't the SMTP server be the same as your laptop SMTP setup?

If that doesn't work call 1860 for help

Big One
06-20-04, 18:06
Yet Another Mobile Phone Alternative

Since people are discussing mobile phones in China I thought I would add my 2 cents. In many major cities in China you can also buy phones and phone service that only work within the city limits. For example, in Shenzhen you can buy a mobile phone and service that only works within Shenzhen. The advantage of such a phone is that the rate is identical to home Chinese home phone rates, which is often much less than normal Chinese mobile phone rates. Home phone calls to another home phone number are essentially free, for example. This can also come in handy for receiving calls from the US, in which case the the call would essentially be free for the receiver. Also, you can call the US for relatively cheaply (for China anyways) by using the phone to dial a local access number of a calling card company. You could do the same with a normal mobile phone, but you would be billed additional $ since any airtime with normal mobile phones have a per minute rate. The disadvantages are that in my experience there are too many dropped calls (for local calls) and you cannot get voice mail. Don't know about text messaging, though. Also, of course, there is the obvious disadvantage of not being able to use the phone outside the city. In summary, this type of phone is probably not good as a primary phone for business people but makes a good second phone for those people that want to receive international calls for free anywhere within a city.

Big One

Wicked SH
06-21-04, 05:09
Don't trust T-mobile to unlock the phone. I and several of my friends have been unable to get the codes from them. I had to get the codes for my Nokia off the web, and my Pocket PC Phone Edition I had to hack by uploading a developers ROM to unlock.

In the US with T-Mobile they sometimes block SMTP access, and also your provider will sometimes only allow certain networks to access the server. It happens alot when someone releases a new mail virus. So it is best to have a server based on the local network in order to send messages.

Wicked

Lucky888
06-21-04, 18:40
Good point, Big One. I cannot remember what that system is called, but you have to go through China Telecom to set it up. The service is extremely cheap but pretty shitty. For example, that phone won't work inside many building (like factories, big shopping centers/markets, etc) with thick walls. Lousy reception, lots of static, and dropped calls are the norm if you use this thing indoors.

One issue for most, though, I'm 95% sure you need to have a local address and proof of residency at that address (water, electric bill, etc) to sign up for that service. If anyone knows otherwise, feel free to correct me.

------------

As far as GSM prepaid SIM cards go, here are a few things to remember:
1) China Mobile's coverage is much wider and better than China Unicom's
2) For nationwide use and easy recharging, get a Shenzhou-xing card from China Mobile.
3) All SIM cards have a "home" province or region, which will be wherever you buy the card. It costs more to make and receive calls in other provinces/areas. This can be costly quite quickly. The very helpful English setup guide that comes with your SIM card will detail these costs.
4) In many areas (outside your home area), the English menu system for recharging your Shenzhou-xing card may not work; however, it most always works to check your balance. To recharge with the Chinese menu system:
after dialing and the system answers, press 1 for Chinese, press 1 to recharge, press 1 # to recharge your own card, then enter the pin number from the charge card followed by #. You'll then get an SMS telling you your new balance.

-------------

Lastly, it is possible to get an prepaid China Unicom CDMA R-UIM card. If you don't kwow what an R-UIM card is, then forget this option. I just mentioned it for those non-Americans who might have a CDMA phone with a live, unlocked R-UIM slot. Unicom is expanding it's CDMA network and the call quality is quite good; coverage is available in all urban, suburban, and industrial zones.

-----------

If you need to buy a GSM phone, I must say that Hong Kong (Monk Kok electronics market next to Mong Kok MTR station) is THE place to buy your phone. It WILL cost you substantially more to buy it in China and you'll have less selection. Every phone sold in HK is unlocked.

Big One
06-21-04, 20:04
Lucky888,

Thanks for contributing, my friend. Itís true that China Telecom, the government backed monopoly that provides all home phone service in China, is the only provider of this type of city-based mobile phone service. However, I wish to point out to others that you sign up for this service through the same small mobile phone company vendors/shops that other mobile phone companies sell through. (In other words, itís not like you have to go to one of the huge China Telecom billing offices to sign up for this mobile service). As for having to provide a local address, I do recall giving that, but donít recall having to provide proof that I actually lived there (ie: water bill). The bills were not in my name so it probably wouldnít have helped me. I also want to point out that this is a prepaid service. You recharge by purchasing phone cards available at convenience stores. Therefore, they are probably not super-concerned about verifying your address (since you pay in advance).

Cheers,

Big One

Nightwing88
06-23-04, 15:16
Hi Big One and Lucky,

The service you're talking about is called XiaoLingTong, or Little Smart. The service is not all that great, but a lot of mainland Chinese are beginning to use it. I would prefer using the prepaid SIM cards of China Mobile instead, as I hate it when phone calls break up in mid-conversation.

Ram Boy
06-25-04, 23:56
Hello BlnkNameCruiser and others,

You seem to be really knowledgable about China and chinese woemen and culture. As someone, who is about to depart for Shanghai soon, for about a 10 days holiday, could you give me a few pointers as to where to stay, and where I could go for punting purposes. I am an absolute beginner, have read all the information, but i am out of my depths. I don't even understand the acronyms, all you guys are using!. This is my very FIRST visit to China. Please help.

Thanks,

All the best.

Bill Lee
07-22-04, 03:04
About T-Mobile,

After two months, I did get my GSM phone unlock over the phone as promised by the store rep. in New York. In fact, the manager tried to get it unlock for me sooner but lost touch with the tech guy in T-Mobile.

Every time I come back to GZ, I switch SIM card and use a Chinese local telephone number to call out and receive. When I make calls to the U.S., I use a calling card I buy off the street.

In buying the calling card, I tell the vendor that I'm using a cell phone to make calls. Sometimes if I don't tell them, they'll give me the wrong calling card that won't work with cell phone. But I'm told by my buddies back that that's all fixed now.

Also, in buying charge card for the cell phone, you have tell the vendor what telephone number you have so that they can give you the right charge card. I have always asked the vendor to do the charge for me and they willing will do it. They hand me back my phone to hear the automated recording telling me how much money has been charged into the phone.

Bill

Limeister
07-22-04, 11:52
There does not seem to be a post about caller ID. How does you block caller ID so the other person can't tell?

Kunshan
07-23-04, 05:14
Although there is an option on your phone to not send your own number, it doesn't work.

The Chinese system will always send your own number.

Call from public phones if needed. If you are really paranoid then use public phones away from your office or home.

Travel Guy
07-26-04, 16:22
I have enjoyed reading all the post in the China area, althou I will never get to China I enjoy reading abouth this part of the world.

I have one question that I would liked asked.

You talk about Barber Shops. Would you go in to decription as to what it is, and what type of services are offerd.

Thanking you in advance.

OldAsiaHand
07-29-04, 00:37
Travel Guy,

Barber Shops (BBS) are just the official license being used for many P4P establishments in China. The fittings are just a cover. Normally, you cannot get a haircut. They offer a full range of sexual services either upstairs or in the back of the shop, or, in apartments close-by. Unfortunately, most of the accomodations leave much to be desired in terms of cleanliness. Generally patronized by local clients, the prices are on the lower end of the scale.

OAH

Limeister
07-30-04, 20:40
Just wanted to know.

Is it ever advisable to give your home address to a BBS girl so that you can do her at home?

I had BBS experience and never did like the small dirty rooms.

OldAsiaHand
08-02-04, 05:32
Limeister,

Unfortunately, I cannot bring BBS girls home due to my living arrangements, however, I would not hesitate to do so if circumstances allowed it. I often take them back to my hotel when travelling because it is cleaner than the rooms they provide. I reckon BBS girls are safer than SWs since you know where they came from. I generally take girls out of BBS where I know the lao ban yang just to be safe.

Just my POV.

OAH

Member #4198
08-07-04, 20:52
Greetings Everyone,

Im a US citizen living in Shanghai, does any one know how I can obtain a chinese drivers license? I will be shipping my Lexus SUV in soon, let me know if anyone wants to cruise with some BBS girls. Any of your advice is much appreciated.

Nutso
08-08-04, 03:29
Goldwind,

Check out this site on getting a driving license in Shanghai - amazing what's on the Internet. http://www.expatsh.com/Driving%20in%20China.htm. I haven't gotten one in China, but I have both Taiwan and HK licenses and it's always been amazing to me how easy it can be as long as you've got a valid U.S. driver's license.

OldAsiaHand
08-08-04, 06:18
goldwind,

I found a local company in Guangzhou that arranged a Chinese license for me. The cost was 1,600 RMB. If you have a foreign license you do not have to take the driving test. You have to take the written one, but they provided a car to the place and gave me the answers to fill in. I am sure that there are similar companies in Shanghai. If not, you can get it in Guangzhou and use it in Shanghai. Let me know if you need the contact in Guangzhou and I will PM you.

OAH

James Cook
08-08-04, 09:32
Travel Guy,

There are generally 3 sorts BBS in China.

1) Brothel BBS. There are almost no scissors, blowers and other trimming tools in the room but a long bench and sofa in which ten more gals lounge. Girls right here can offer outcall service, FS and BBBJ, not very pricy comparing to KTV girls, 200RMB for ST.

2)Legit BBS. Stools along each side of the hall, mirrors hang in the wall, Some male are doing the haircut. Obviously no extra service are offerrd right here.

3) Utility BBS. Just about 4 or 5 gals in the room, some neccessary tools are on the tables, gals will do haircut, hairwash, massage and HJ. BJ and FS are seldom offerrd here. 100RMB for a BJ in a small room.

JC

Discovery Channel
08-13-04, 04:44
Just want to add to the GSM biz.

In China, the gsm frequency is mostly 900, some 1800.
In the U.S., its mostly 1900 and 850.

So the best is to get a tri or quad band phone.

Most tri band phones in the U.S. are 1900/1800/850. Which will only work on some region.

It best to get a phone which is 1900/1800/900 tri band.

I have the ATT SE T637 and is has 1900/1800/850 which will work in some areas only.

Hope this helps.

Seahorse
08-26-04, 20:37
Wondering the following:

Is there a way for a Western to survive in an illegal base in SH, like setting up yr own class of interested student for English conversation lessons. I'm thinking of erning 6000 RMB / mth that will be enough. Or is there anybody who has connections who I may contact?

Anybody got experience in this matter?

I just wanna flee my country and I love China.

SH

Cmann
08-30-04, 18:22
Does anyone know how much it costs to go from the Hong Kong airport to the train station to go to Guangzhou via cab? Thank you for your time.

Any hotel recommendations in Hong Kong?

Thank you

Norse Kaiser
08-31-04, 02:30
Seahorse, come to think of it, I may be able to give you some kind of assistance in this regard, by the way, mind telling me where you are from?

NK

OldAsiaHand
08-31-04, 04:24
Member #1537:

Suggest you just take a bus directly from HK airport to GZ for about HK$200+. Taxi will run you another $200+ from airport to Kowloon Station (Hong Hom) for the train.

OAH

Weelock
08-31-04, 12:08
To Member #1537:

I agree with OAH. I recommend you taking a bus but a a mini-van might be better. A taxi will cost you too must money. It's a 2 to 2.5 hour by taxi. For sure traffic once you hit Guangzhou. I guess you could split the cost if you are with other people.

For bus companies, after exiting customs at the airport, you will see "Area A" on the left. "Area A" is also left of a MacDonald's. You will see about twelve bus companies. A mini-van is faster since you don't have to exit the mini-van at border for passports. For a bus, you have to get off and on again for passports. After arriving at the bus station you still need a taxi.

My recommendation, is a mini-van but it will cost about 50 RMB more than a bus. I have included two scans of two different companies but you need to get to "Area A" for the correct bus or mini-van. You can see "Area A" on the two scans. Being Hong Kong, a lot of the companies speak English.

Weelock

Frist scan of HK airport "Area A" posting:

Weelock
08-31-04, 12:16
To Member #1537:

Second scan of the HK airport "Area A". This scan you will see a MacDonald's. You can call these two companies for more information.

For others

Sorry this in NOT a picture of a girl.

Slitherer
08-31-04, 22:39
#1537

I second that. Take a bus directly from Chek Lap Kok to GZ. The bus companies are located inside the airport at the kiosks on the arrival level towards the street. They may stop running around mid evening (8pm?) so check before you depart. It's really convenient that way. Cheaper too. The bus attendants are cute too.

S

Rickyeoh99
09-01-04, 01:47
Heard that there is a direct service from HK airport to Shekou (Shenzen) without going thru the HK immigration via bonded bus and then ferry. Has anybody here tried it? How long does the trip take? How about the return trip?

Travel Dog
09-02-04, 08:46
The Hong Kong Airport has a great web site. http://www.hongkongairport.com/eng/index.jsp
It has all the information you could want on connecting to and from the airport. As OAH says the bus is the better deal versus a cab.

OldAsiaHand
09-04-04, 03:39
Weelock,

You should request a senior upgrade. I am sure you qualify. Your posts are still being delayed. If the process still requires support from another member, just let me know. I would be glad to sponsor you.

OAH

Weelock
09-04-04, 07:51
Hi OAH,

I agree that my posting are being delayed. I noticed even for a few days. I requested a senior upgrade about 4 weeks ago. I will wait another week and apply again. I think jackson is reviewing people up to Aug 5 or 7.

I tried sending jackson an email about different problems but his e-mail address as has changed. ( It's broken in "Contact Us" ). I wanted my login id change from "S Weelock" to something else. Was thinking of a new id of "TomCat" or "TomKat" or a last id called "AlleyCat". I think jackson might be too busy with other things. For example, the "seach engine" and "Contact Us" has been broken for a while.

I also wanted to send him some money. Just a few bucks. How is this done. There was something about this before but I couldn't find it in the FAQ section. Suggest he add this in the FAQ.

Thanks,

Weelock or "TomCat" or "TomKat" or "AlleyCat"

Weelock
09-04-04, 11:25
Hi OAH,

I tried sending you a PM but your mail box is full. Therefore I'm posting this message.

Was wonder if you looked into getting the room at Grand Holiday cheaper. I found a place for $46 and $48 but I can't find the website again. You might want to talk with the Sales/Marketing dept at Grand Holiday for a better price.

See this link for $355RMB

http://www.yizhou168.com/hotel/hotelshow.asp?hotelid=1712

Weelock or "TomCat" or "TomKat"

Member #1461
09-10-04, 03:02
Hello everyone,

I am new to this forum, I have a question about living and working in China.

I am 24, Canadian, I have a bachlor degree in business administration and a masters degree in professional communication, and I will soon finish another bachlor this year in Chinese language studies (Mandarin).

These last 5 years since I finished highschool I concentrated on doing my degrees as fast as I could and now that I am about to finish the last one I want to start working soonafter in China using my newly gained Chinese language skills.

What do you recommend is the best way for me to obtain a good job working in China ? Which types of companies that are doing business in China will pay the best salary for someone well qualified (although without actual experience yet) ?

I am just not sure what is the best way to get a good well paid job working for an American or European company in China. I have no work experience yet since I just finished my studies.

Where should I start ?
I just dont know how to make the first step on getting a good job in China, where should I look ?

I really need a good advice from any expats working for American / European companies in China on how to start.

Thanks very much,

Paul

Seahorse
09-14-04, 08:11
I propose we introduce a new term here: Sinophilia, the obessed love for Chinese (women).

I know they are boring, especially compared to Indo girls or Philippina, but they are so divine!

I live in Amsterdam, close to Chinatown. Honestly, if there wouldnt be any Chinese girls in Holland, I would go crazy, but now, with the limited numbers I am going insane!

That's why my plan is moving to China, preferably Shanghai, but what to do there? Now I'm teaching Dutch in Holland, but a few posts ago I asked if somebody could tell me what possibilities there are in China. Does anyone know if the Chinese mafia provide work to foreigners. Doesnt have to be legal, as long as it makes some money. Do I sound desperate? I am. I'm a sinophile in the wrong continent !

Any suggestion is welcome, but pls no psychiatric one.

Norse Kaiser
09-20-04, 06:46
Seahorse, I do not quite understand, China is such a huge country, then why do you have to settle down in Shanghai?

Perhaps you should try Beijing for a change. A lot of cute girls in there too.

NK

Seahorse
09-23-04, 08:00
Hi Norse Kaiser,

Basicky IDC where I will be in China. The point is how to survive there, that is the core of my previous report.

Does anyone know how the streetgirls (those who ask you to go with them and drink a cup of tea) work? Do they have an employer (pimp) or are they students who try to earn some extra money. What is there charge for overnight? Or are they just there to rip you of and leave after a social chat?

I'm thinking of doing some personal marketing for them.

Cheers,

SH

Jman90024
09-23-04, 17:00
This article The Tsingtao Advantage: Western Expats in a City with Few (http://www.alwayson-network.com/comments.php?id=6042_0_11_0_C) may be interest of expats in China.

Wondering if the author is a fellow monger. ;)

James Cook
09-28-04, 14:09
Is there any white monger here own or run a sauna establishment or a BBS in one of the major cities (beijing shenzhen shanghai) in China, I m just curious to know. If someone does, I definitly will patronize his shop.

JC

Norse Kaiser
09-29-04, 03:56
Hi James,

With regards to your ques, I seriously doubt the very existence of any LaoWei owned Sauna esbablishment, not to mention BBS, I firmly believe there r very few, if any at all, BBS owned by people other than the locals.

Practical reasons: BBS and Sauna are supposed to be highly risky, even for the local chinese, though they might also be quite lucrative sometimes when the owners choose the right place and have the necessary Guanxi at the same time.

To set up a BBS, according to my knowledge, you obviously need to maintain substantial relations with the local authority, especially the police, simply to avoid being raided during a regular crackdown. With all those language barriers and cultural difference, I hardly think anyone from out of China can achieve this, not to say from Europe or N.America. Plus, you also have to go through complicated formalities to set up one. This could be too much of a project.

NK

Riain
09-29-04, 05:45
How to learn chinese

I went to a BBS a few times. One day this girl start to seriously try talk to me. My Chinese was terrible. She became ocassional lover and I still went to BBS. where we chatted for hours and hours in Chinese (massage was long forgotten).

Now my Chinese is usable, probably far from fluent, but I have few problems in the street.

My ayi (maid) entered the picture when I could speak to her without problems.

Now we speak Chinese togther as though we are natives.

She very quickly explained that it would be very convenient for both of us if I was her boyfriend. Wife will not worry if she is in the house etc. We did the deed.

She claims that I am first since she was married (20+years).

About 2 days later she told me to drop the girlfiend.

El Frances
10-11-04, 16:23
Hello!

I intend to travel a little in China with my chinese girlfriend. We don't have any experience in travelling together. Should we expect that hotels (mostly 3-star hotels) will not accept that we check-in together, and that we have to take two rooms?

Thanks

Moody
10-11-04, 19:24
El Frances,

Don't worry about it. I've never heard of that happening.

OldAsiaHand
10-12-04, 03:42
El Frances,

They still have the right to ask to see a marriage license when you check in. Having said that, it has not happened to me for a few years. I would not worry about it these days. Most 3-star hotels are probably not very interested in your status anyway.

OAH

OldAsiaHand
10-12-04, 03:44
James Cook,

I know some BBS in Shenzhen that are owned by HK guys usually with a Chinese G/F.

OAH

Hoeman
10-12-04, 04:19
El Frances,

Pls do note that the Chinese govt. have strict regulations on this matter. A foreigner and a local of diferent gender checking into the same room is a no-no, unless there is proof of marriage. It actually depends on the hotel itself on how strict they try to enforce this regualtion.

FYI, it happened to me & my GF twice in Guangzhou. 1st at a small guesthouse beside the Pearl River, where we finally managed to convince the reception to let us stay for a night by both of us signing a paper stating that we mutually agree to stay together. I suppose this is to absolve the guesthouse from being responsible.

The 2nd time was in LiuHua hotel(3-4star). They absolutely refused to let us check into the same room. I made a lot of noise, of course, saying that I've never encountered anything like that before (My GF & I have travelled to several places in China and the other hotels don't even bother to ask). Fortunately, at that time, my uncle & aunt were with us. So we checked my aunt & GF in one room and me & my uncle in another. But for that duration, I was with my GF the whole time and nothing happened. The reception explained that it is because their location is near the bus & train station and the police come in to check regularly.

But, you shouldn't worry too much though. Some hotels only require one person's ID to check in. Therefore, it is unnecessary to check-in your GF's name as well. Plus, there are so many hotels around; if one doesn't allow you to check-in with your GF, you can always try another hotel that does. It actually depends on the hotel itself, whether they are willing to close one eye or not. Evidently, you will be a paying customer and that is all that really matters.

Hoeman,

p.s. FYI, hotels with ratings below 3-star are not allowed to take in foreigners, but I myself have stayed in guesthouses and 2-star hotels in China before. So, I'm guessing that it is at the discretion of the hotel itself on whether they want to enforce certain regulations.

Papadum
10-12-04, 05:53
El Frances:

It happens.

There is still a law in China that all guest need to be registered, and only married couples can dwell together in one room, and no guests are allowed in the room after 11pm curfew....even though many hotels couldn't care less about it nowadays.

Therefore you should check in by yourself. If you check in together with the girl then they would have the obligation to ask her to register, by law. Once they've seen you two thgether in and out the hotel they wouldn't bother you.

This law is quite seriuosly monitored in Shenzhen once in a while, but not in cities like Shanghai.

Loafer
10-12-04, 13:53
If I remember correctly the restriction that a man and a woman who are not married cannot stay in the same room has actually been lifted some time ago, at least in some areas if not nationwide. I never had any trouble staying with a girl friend in one room, and I normally don't register them.

However, I had one case where I could not pass by a security staff one evening when I wanted to bring back a pro, so I registered her at the reception and it did the trick. I am not trying to suggest that this method will work all the time.

Prostitution remains of course illegal.

Miclac
10-13-04, 01:13
Riaian,

That is how not to learn Chinese. How to really learn Chinese is to actually attend a university and study it formally. Or if you have a good paying job in China hire a professor of Chinese from a good university to tutor you. A girl who works in a bbs is not going to have the proper education. If you want to learn how to sound like a poorly educated Chinese speaking in a heavy accent then a bbs is the way to go. If not, try my method.

Kunshan
10-13-04, 03:20
I have never had any problems taking a girl to a hotel room. In most difficult cases (2-3 in the morning) I just met her in the lobby.

In once case we checked in together and she registered with her ID card. However if the girl is from the same city then it might be an issue to register her.

El Frances
10-13-04, 13:13
Thanks for your help!

Long CU
10-16-04, 07:59
Hi all fellows,

I want to buy a small house or apartment in a small town near Shanghai or Beijing. It must be a small town, no matter how small the town is. The radius would be 50km from city center.

How much would one like that be?

On the way to go to many cities from the airports, on the bus I saw many kind of old buildings here and there, and they are not far from the new motorway. I guess this is an economical way to live near city and also don't have to suffer the pollution. Also for the high buildings in China cities, if fire ever broke out(sorry to mention, just techniquely), I am not sure how people from 10th floor up manage to get out

So, like a true American suburbaner, I prefer the outside. It is even better if the house is the pure countryside. Just that it is not so far from the city center of SH or BJ, I will make it a good dwelling with grass, garden, fish pond, etc.

Kind of thing like that, how much money expected to buy it?

C Me Type
10-19-04, 07:09
New flats (condos) usually go for about 200,000-300,000 rmb. You can also look into second hand flats which goes for alot less.

OldAsiaHand
10-19-04, 09:00
Long CU,

I guess no matter what we say you are going to stick with this girl, taxi driver, or otherwise. Anyway, maybe I was a bit harsh on you in my last post. I apologize for that if you were offended. Your story just seemed a bit hard to believe at times.

Obviously, houses get cheaper the farther you go from the city. Shanghai and east have gone through crazy appreciation over the past few years and very expensive at the moment. Beijing may be slightly better value for money and more suitable since your girl is a northerner anyway. Shanghai people can be harsh on those from other parts of China. Expect to pay 3-4k per square meter for something decent a bit of a ways out of town.

Just my POV.

OAH

Moody
10-23-04, 21:31
Long CU,

So what's the deal? You're going to hook up with the girl and buy her an apartment? OAH is right, a decent apartment will cost 3000RMB per sq. meter. A two bedroom place will probably be around 70-80 sq. meters. If you buy into a place that has no elevator on a high floor, it can be much cheaper. BTW, don't even think of things like a garden or fish pond. It's not like the US where you own a chunk of land when you buy a house. Buying a single family dwelling on a plot of land is very difficult and very expensive.

As for the 10th floor fire thing, they do the same thing in China they do everywhere else in the world. They take the stairs.

Kinesics
10-23-04, 23:39
Long CU,

Moody is absolutely right on his money about a single house in a big city like Shanghai or Beijing - forbiddingly expensive - in either Chinese or American standards.

I happened to spend one full day looking around and assessing housing market in Shanghai during my last trip (four weeks ago) Ė thinking about an investment property or my Shanghai house. My maximum tolerance for hotel stay is one week regardless of how posh the hotel is.

There is a section in Shanghai called "Hongqiao" (sp?) which is in western part of Shanghai and it is near the airport, now mainly operating for domestic flights (used to be the international airport for Shanghai) after Pudong International opened up. This is the area where many expat's live (I saw three international schools in this town) and quite a few single or vila style houses around. Price for these has been gradually going up speculating that the government would not allow to build such style housing any more in order to preserve scarce land to build high rise apartments to house more people.

Then I went to a new apartment construction site in near downtown Shanghai. (I can get you exact information if you wanted to). Granted it gears towards high-income folks (locals, folks from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and a few Westerners), pricing for these apartments were set on extremely high-end. Each building is configured for 40 to 48 stories. There will be about 10 buildings. Typical floor layouts are either two bedrooms and two bathrooms, or three bedrooms and two bathrooms. Sizes range from 120 sq meters to 170 sq meters while there are a few huge apartments over 200 sq meters for four bedrooms.

Average sq meter price is 20,000 RMB up to around 20th floor and then unit price goes up as the floor goes up. High floor apartments (30th and up) are priced at 23,000 RMB per sq meter. All buildings are in construction and almost half of the apartments have been sold. Quick math tells me that a good size three bed/two bath apartment will cost me about cool $500K dollars. As a newbie to China, it was interesting experience to taste ever changing China (at least east coastal cities) powered by all cylinder hitting growth engine.

Another reference point for you. O2G

Papadum
10-26-04, 04:44
Hi friends in Shenzhen:

I am Beijing based. I have to go to Shenzhen for a meeting and onward to Hong Kong to do some shopping. I would then have to go back to Shenzhen airport to fly back to Beijing. Could any one tell me if there is a bus running between Hong Kong and Shenzhen airport? If there is one, where to get on the bus?

thx a m

Member #3428
10-26-04, 05:10
There's a few services that go between Shenzhen and Hong Kong Airport. China Travel Service, Eternal East, Golden Trip Express, Trans-Island Chinalink, and GoGo Bus all go between them. I think only Trans-Isalnd Chinalink and China Travel Service go between Hong Kong Airport and Shenzhen Airport. The rest go between Hong Kong Airport and Shenzhen itself. Or I should say it was like that before, I could easily be wrong as to their current drop off point.

The web sites that I know are Go Go Bus http://www.gogobus.com/travel/inside/index.asp , China Travel Service http://ctsbus.hkcts.com/ , Eternal East http://www.eebus.com/ .

I grabbed the buses from HK airport itself as I was always flying in.

Hope that Helps set your travel.

Tansak KTV

Hari Hara
10-26-04, 18:58
Hi friends in Shenzhen:

I am Beijing based. I have to go to Shenzhen for a meeting and onward to Hong Kong to do some shopping. I would then have to go back to Shenzhen airport to fly back to Beijing. Could any one tell me if there is a bus running between Hong Kong and Shenzhen airport? If there is one, where to get on the bus?

thx a m

Just take the MTR(mass transit railway) to Hong Kong and Back....but you do have to go through customs and back.

The MTR does not go to Shenzhen airport

Santa
10-27-04, 05:16
papadam.

i think there is a high speed boat to shikou and then a bus to shenzhen airport.
oah is the man to ask.

Papadum
10-27-04, 13:29
Thanks Tansak... for the info.

Gibson
10-27-04, 15:18
Hi,

I have a somewhat strange story to tell and I hope i'm posting it into the right place.

I recently met a very nice chinese woman in Shanghai, she hasn't been too long here, maybe 2 to 3 years. She occasionally works as SW because for her this is the only way to earn some money, but she is really not the 'regular' kind of SW (I tell you later, why). Specially towards the end of the month she needs some money to pay the rent.

She is 32 years old, was married with a chinese guy a long time ago but maybe only for a year or so. She has a son, 10 years old, he stays with his grandmother far away from Shanghai in her hometown. She told me she never loved her husband but she was very young at that time. She figured out, she cannot love chinese men.

She has been together for some time with foreigners, but most of the time these guys were married. She is maybe not the stunner anymore (maybe never was) but she has an unbelievable attitude, I have not met many girls that were so nice and warm hearted as she is. Probably the reason why she was having quite long relationships with these foreigners.

And she is not ugly at all, she has pure white teeth and an incredible smile. She is smiling a lot, it seems that she is a very positive personality, allthough in quite a miserable situation having to support her family far away and no regular income.

She is quite intelligent, speaks a very decent english but never learned this in school but by herself.

But Expats sometimes disappear (go back or to another place) or their wifes come to China.

Why I said she is not the 'regular' kind of SW: I was sneaking aroung BBS and massage parlors on a street, but since I hesitated and went back and forth I must have passed several times the place she was standing. Normaly a SW would immediately start bugging you and ask about massage or sex, but she didn't.

She approached me with a big smile and said she had seen me looking for something, and if she could help me somehow. So we got into conversation, I was attracted by her smile and her good english skills.

After some time only (maybe 5 minutes) she offered me a foot massage or a full body massage or, if I wanted, also sex, either in her place or in mine. I asked for the price and she said, laughing loudly, "no problem, you pay what you want. If you don't like it you don't pay. If you like it, you pay what you want, I need some money and you surely also need some money so you cannot spend more as you want. For me it's no problem."

I was smashed by these arguments! I was not really trying to bring someone home that night, therefore I declined (because I don't like SW in general), but we exchanged the mobile numbers. She didn't beg or bugging me at all to take her with me.

Two nights later I walked on the same street and there she is again. She still remembered my name and was making jokes with me. The lady was getting more and more interesting so I invited her to my place. She agreed happily and off we went.

At home we started more conversation, maybe 2 hours or so. The atmosphere was very good and she told me some of her story. Suddenly we realised it was 1 pm already so we went to have a shower together and went to bed. A very nice night for me, she has very good skills.

The next morning, knowing she had financial problems, I offered her 500 RMB, also knowing this was not too much for that really enjoyable night with her (3 absolutely wonderful sessions), but i also kinda wanted to test her.

She kissedme goodbye and said "Thank you".

Again, 3 nights later, I couldn't resist, I wanted to know if she was on the street again. So I walked along that street, but she wasn't there. I never called her and she never called me by mobile. On my way back she suddenly appeared, running behind me, she said she had seen me from very far away, and there it was again, this wonderful smile.

I explained, I was not able to pay her everytime as much as the last time and I wasn't sure if I should invite her again. She said "no problem, you don't have to pay, if you want, I still go with you". I then found out that she could not use her appartment that night because the girl living together with her in the same appartment was having a customer at home.

So I told her to come with me and we again had a wonderful night together. But even before going to bed together I spontaneously offered her 1000 RMB, not for love service, but because I felt she really needs that money. She didn't want to accept, but I insisted, saying at the same time I would not give her more than this and i did not expect anything for this.

During that night she got really sad because she said she always met nice guys that are already married. She would like to find a man, but not a chinese man, she couldn't ever love a chinese man.

I don't want to make her life more difficult as it is already but i feel very sorry for her and her situation. That's why I don't want to meet her on a regular basis, I will definitively not fall in love with her. Maybe I will find her again on 'her' street, but not very often.

Your comments are appreciated.

Gibson

P.S.: Anyone willing to marry her can PM me ;-)

OldAsiaHand
10-27-04, 16:29
Papadum,

I am not sure if the ferries from Hong Kong Island or Kowloon go to Furong which is the ferry terminal nearest to the Shenzhen airport. They do go from the HKIA. You will have to check when you get to Hong Kong.

The other option is to take a bus to HuangGang and then a taxi to the Shenzhen airport. There are buses from several locations in Hong Kong. For example, the buses leave from Lockhart Road in Wanchai. I just took this one last week, 42HK$ on the Octopus, 45 for cash. All the taxi drivers in HK know where it is.

OAH

Papadum
10-27-04, 16:56
Thanks OAH, Hari...et al, for all the choices.

(actually I don't like Shenzhen at all but still I have to go...)

Shanghai Noon #2
10-27-04, 20:11
Sorry if this is a little strange in this section. I was wondering if anyone know of a good steakhouse in Shanghai. I am on the Atkins diet and cannot find any good steaks here. Shanghai doesn't have the steakhouse chain like Morton's. I think there is a steakhouse in the Four Season's hotel called "The Steakhouse", I wondered if anyone has tried it and if it is good.

Travel Dog
10-28-04, 07:44
Gibson
Nice post. This is such a familar story to me. It is amazing how much difficulty and trouble the Chinese women go through. They carry life's burdons and still keep a great attitude. This is why I love China so much.

Makes you wish you could take care of all of them, but unfortunately we can't. We can only make a large difference to a small number. Or with some of us, like OAH, a small difference to a large number!
TD

OldAsiaHand
10-28-04, 16:01
TravelDog,

Just to let you know that I am living up to my reputation, I did 3 in the last 24 hours. The first one yesterday in a SZ BBS I spoiled with 200RMB (150 + 50 tip) since service was beyond expectations. The second SW near the hotel was another 200RMB (she was very sweet, stayed nearly 3 hours and did not even ask for money, very similar to Gibson's experience. She even wanted to stay all night for the same money) , and a BBS girl in Humen with a great rack this evening for 130RMB.

OAH

Gaolei
10-29-04, 01:55
There is a brazillian style restaurant in Shanghai. It is a continuous Churriscaria (-10 Sp.) type restaurant where they do have carbs at the buffet table, but if you sit in your seat, you will be served one meat after another. I think the name is Brazil. It is across from the library.

Levitian
10-29-04, 04:20
There are some good grills in the 5-stars around town, to mention is the one in the Bund-Center, the one in the Grand-Hyatt (best meat in town, expensive, though), etc.

Try 'Dan's Farmhouse' on Julu Road. It is a 'German Restaurant', but Dan is from Denmark, and he is a butcher. He is supposed to know about meat. He is also serving steaks.

Levitian

Kranky99
10-29-04, 05:59
If anyone wants to try the steakhouse at The For Seasons, please don't. I went there with my GF and it was a total letdown. The steak was overdone and dry even when I requested for medium rare and it was really expensive, costs me about RMB 1,800 for two of us. ( 2 glass of red wine, main course + deserts)

Furthurmore, my friend stayed at the hotel and during their breakfast, they were given expired jam spread. Man, was he furious.

If anyone has tried a good steak house, please do share.

china
10-29-04, 16:26
Kranky,

JC Mandarin has a reasonably good steakhouse. Polana at Xintiandi is also quite good.

China

Shanghai Noon #2
10-30-04, 20:28
Thanks for the post by Kranky I didn't go to the Four Season's steakhouse as initially planned. I went to another place recommended by another member. The place is called "San Francisco Steakhouse" and it was pretty good. The phone is 21-6209-3377. I ordered the tenderloin and it was ok. Just make sure that you order it "50% - 60%" to get the medium-rare. Of course quality wise it is not even close to a place like "Peter Luger" in NY or even a Morton's. However, for me it was enough:-) Just to get me over until I head back to the states. I really miss a good old fashion steak like we have in the good old USA of A. If anyone wants to open up a Morton's Chain here please PM me, I like to sign up as a lifetime member.

AsianMan
10-31-04, 04:44
Kranky99 and others:

If you want to enjoy a good steak in Beijing, go to the 2nd floor inside the Hilton Hotel on 3rd ring road (Just north of Great Wall Sheraton). Price is reasonable but the steak is great.

Gibson
11-15-04, 17:21
Continuing my last post in this thread...

In the meantime I met this girl around 3 times a week, and she seems to like to come to my room. She allways stays for the night and treats me really nice, mostly I end up with too little sleep, specially because she keeps caressing me all night long (very nice btw). She does an incredible BBBJCIM and she also likes to fuck.

And she takes really care you feel good, a great GFE all the time. Absolutely relaxing, no hassle. She is never in a hurry. 2 to 3 sessions per night (no wonder I don't get enough sleep)

But I also found out, she will not have sex with everybody she meets, she seems to be choosy, specially if someone seems not to be clean.

Her massage is rather soft, could be somewhat harder, but as explained before, she is the 'serving' kind of girl, wants to provide maximum satisfaction.

The other day I took her for some shopping, which she enjoyed. But she did not just 'spend my money', all she bought was 2 T-shirts and a nice jeans. Total damage less than 100 RMB! Because she is allways nice to me I regularly give her some money, allthough she is not asking for some money. In average I give her maybe 300 RMB per night, but for the service I get I think this is not much.

I don't want to keep it as a freebie thing because I think it will be easier to cut this one day.

It is a pity, that these kind of girls are the exception.

Gibson

Csun213
11-15-04, 22:22
Hi guys, I need a little help. I am planning on purchasing a Cingular phone in the U.S. Since I use the phone only for emergency, I am thinking about a Cingular Prepaid phone. Because I travel to China ever now and then I would like the Cingular phone to be able to work in China. A couple of friends had bought their phone to China and found that they would work with the local prepaid SIM card but their phones are of the older model and is no longer sold.

My question is that I thought that China was on the 800Mhz frequency while the U.S. was on the 1900 Mhz frequency but I am finding out the newer GSM phones sold in the U.S. are either 850/1900 Mhz or 900/1800/1900 Mhz frequency instead of the older 800/1800/1900 Mhz frequency. So did China update their frequency to 800-900 Mhz? Will the newer phones work in China. I would appreciate any help. Thanks in advance.

Bill Lee
11-16-04, 01:11
This is the most important thing about GSM phones. You better get an unlocked one. Otherwise, switching SIM card will not work. Ask your cingular dealer whether the phone are unlocked. You can always bring another SIM card with you to test it out before you walk out of the store.

I have been back to China several times with my T-mobile Nokia 3650 phone, which is a GSM 900/1800/1900 phone. Which was unlocked by T-Mobile after three month of paid service as promised.

To save money, I simply switch to a local SIM card and use a Chinese calling card to dial out international calls.

I also have seen T-Mobile offering prepaid phone with GSM SIM cards in CompUSA. The link in their site is at http://www.t-mobile.com/prepaid/starterkits.asp. But again, I don't know if they are unlocked.

Some phones are 850/900 and automatically switches over to the right frequency.

I also have Motorola GSM v400 phone and after rebate, I received a $100 check and paid nothing for the phone. But this is through a local authorized Cingular dealer who sold me the unlocked phone. That phone is a Quad-Band GSM3 850/900/1800/1900 MHz phone.

Good luck. I'll be going back to China in Xmas.

Wahoolee
11-16-04, 04:20
Look for your phone brand on the left of the page:

http://www.thetravelinsider.info/roadwarriorcontent/motorolaunlocking.htm

Csun213
11-17-04, 02:02
Thanks Bill Lee for the information. Does anyone know whether China is GSM at the 800 Mhz or 900 Mhz?




This is the most important thing about GSM phones. You better get an unlocked one. Otherwise, switching SIM card will not work. Ask your cingular dealer whether the phone are unlocked. You can always bring another SIM card with you to test it out before you walk out of the store.

I have been back to China several times with my T-mobile Nokia 3650 phone, which is a GSM 900/1800/1900 phone. Which was unlocked by T-Mobile after three month of paid service as promised.

To save money, I simply switch to a local SIM card and use a Chinese calling card to dial out international calls.

I also have seen T-Mobile offering prepaid phone with GSM SIM cards in CompUSA. The link in their site is at http://www.t-mobile.com/prepaid/starterkits.asp. But again, I don't know if they are unlocked.

Some phones are 850/900 and automatically switches over to the right frequency.

I also have Motorola GSM v400 phone and after rebate, I received a $100 check and paid nothing for the phone. But this is through a local authorized Cingular dealer who sold me the unlocked phone. That phone is a Quad-Band GSM3 850/900/1800/1900 MHz phone.

Good luck. I'll be going back to China in Xmas.

Bill Lee
11-17-04, 02:14
Hey CSun213. Sorry. Maybe you miss my Subject line: GSM 900 in China.

Here's a list of GSM frequency in different countries.
http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/gsminfo/roa_srts.shtml

BTW, I never heard of 800. GSM 850 yes.

Good luck.

Bill

DJ Nylon Pants
11-17-04, 17:29
If anyone has tried a good steak house, please do share.

Hey Kranky,

In Shanghai.

This place was great: Shanghai Xiti Restaurant, No. 500, Zhangyang Rd., top floor. sorry, no number.

My chinese GF said it was a Taiwanese-style steakhouse. They had a fantastic 5 or 6 course prix fixe thing that was about 200rmb each.

I had a really nice filet mignon, she had the rack of lamb. Only slighty under a Mortons or Ruth's Cris experience, at about onequarter the price.

peace

Csun213
11-17-04, 22:52
Hi Bill Lee, yes I did miss your subject line. Thanks for the information.

One last question to people in China, what do you guys think about purchasing a Motorola V60 cell phone in China which should be unlocked and then bring it back to be used in the U.S. with prepaid card? Thank


Hey CSun213. Sorry. Maybe you miss my Subject line: GSM 900 in China.

Here's a list of GSM frequency in different countries.
http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/gsminfo/roa_srts.shtml

BTW, I never heard of 800. GSM 850 yes.

Good luck.

Bill

Kunshan
11-18-04, 02:08
Csun213,

My only comment is that if you buy a phone in one country and it breaks in another country you are normally not covered by the warranty,,I found out this the hard way, but as I got mine fixed in China at least labor costs were not expensive.

Sound Stream #2
11-18-04, 13:05
Csun213, I once bought a Sony Ericson phone in china, but when I brought it over to he US it did not work. I had forgotten that the US uses Tri-band, whereas the phone I brought in China was Dual-band.

I believe Tri-band phones should support dual-band mode, but someone correct me if I'm wrong.

A Fun Man
11-19-04, 13:49
You can find many cell phone repair services inside China to unlock the phone for you. I had my T-Moble Motorola V66 unlocked and and upgraded new operating software with Chinese Language for 100RMB.
Look for your phone brand on the left of the page:

http://www.thetravelinsider.info/roadwarriorcontent/motorolaunlocking.htm

Papadum
11-19-04, 15:48
It seems like there are so much confusion on this cell phone compatibility discussion and some information here are not correct. once and for all, here's my one and half cents:

-For GSM, there are 4 bands currenly widely in use arould the world. viz: 850/1900 and 900/1800
-850 and 900 were uesed to called GSM, while 1800 and 1900 were called PCS.
-Having said that, PCS is all GSM technology, PCS is said to be cheaper in operation (technically GSM's cells are bigger while PCS' cells are smaller)
-In the States/Canada, some provider use 850, some 1900, and some offer both 850 and 1900
-In most of the rest of the world use 900 and 1800
-China use 900, Hong Kong use both 900 and 1800 by different operators
-In North America, Dual-band refers to 850/1900
-In China. Hong Kong, etc dual-band refers to 900/1800
-In general, tri-band refers to 900/1800/1900
-Earlier this year quad band appears in the market, that refers to the compatibility of all bands...and that's the world. If you are in China, theses new bred of phones are already available here.
-Because the marketing options are different in North America (such as monthly package deal), therefore they lock the phone for business reasons.
-Phones purchased in China/Hong Kong would not be locked, and you can freely use the phones wherever you what with the corresponding band available.

Anyone who know telecom better than me, please correct me accordingly.

Csun213
11-19-04, 20:30
Thanks guys for all the help. I think I know what to do now. I plan on buying a unlocked tri-band phone in the U.S. and then bring the phone to be used in China.

Another item I need help is for Shenzhen. My parents are coming to Shenzhen for 2 months but do not want to live in a hotel. I know that there are short-term apartments in Shenzhen. Would appreciate any help on this subject. Thanks

Member #3428
11-20-04, 12:20
Dear MangoJangous,

Can you give me the contact details.

Thank you

Ajith

QUOTE=MangoJangous]Technique - 8/10
Face - 6/10
Body - 8/10 (small, but firm)
Stamina - 9/10
Attitude - 9/10
BBBJ - 9/10
Cost - Rs. 4000

name : Kavaya

Will exchange for validated contacts.[/QUOTE]

Bill Lee
11-20-04, 15:05
Hi.

I'm planning on meeting my girl either in Beijing or GZ and head down to Hainan Island on Dec. 25. Stay there for a week and return to either Beijing or GZ.

Can anyone give me some ideas as to the best way to get there from either places? Wouldn't mind paying from medium and to the high end in travel cost.

Thanks.

Bill

Csun213
11-20-04, 20:45
Just call any travel agency or look in the local paper. They have a lot of airline that flies to Haikou and Sanya Hainan depends which city you want to go.


Hi.

I'm planning on meeting my girl either in Beijing or GZ and head down to Hainan Island on Dec. 25. Stay there for a week and return to either Beijing or GZ.

Can anyone give me some ideas as to the best way to get there from either places? Wouldn't mind paying from medium and to the high end in travel cost.

Thanks.

Bill

OldAsiaHand
11-21-04, 08:58
Bill Lee,

It's cheaper and faster from GZ, but you are talking about the high season. Even though Christmas is not widely celebrated in China it is used as an excuse to travel by many. I suggest you book the flights very soon.

OAH

Penney
11-27-04, 23:11
Anyone know the cost of laptops in China? As I am about to go to Nanjing and I don't know if computers are cheaper there than in the States.

Bill Lee
11-28-04, 21:55
OAH. Thanks. Will book in the next couple of days.

Bill

Kinesics
11-29-04, 01:09
US brand computers (laptop, desktop and server) are slightly cost more in China than in US. However price difference are small enough and therefore it should not drive purchase decision. Brands like Dell, IBM or HP are being referenced.

More important factors to consider are 1) how will you use the computer and 2) warranty services. If you are planning to use the computer for extended period in China, I would recommend for you to buy one from a local dealer where your computer can be serviced and localized computer can be purchased.

It is well known fact that a leading Chinese computer company like Lenovo has been working hard (or having difficulty) to compete with the US brands from the perspectives of quality and pricing to attract Chinese consumers (23 millions units were sold in China last year) But Lenovo will find ways to achieve their strategic business objective of being one of leading global computer suppliers.

Kunshan
11-29-04, 01:57
The only problem with buying a computer in China is that they come with Chinese language software. Maybe in big cities English can be installed, but its not very commen.

But as per the repair issue, definitly buy in the country you will use the laptop.

Papadum
11-29-04, 15:03
Anyone know the cost of laptops in China? As I am about to go to Nanjing and I don't know if computers are cheaper there than in the States.

Mind you, Computers/Notebooks show in China are using Chinese Windows and software. I am not sure if may be some brand(like Dell) would also sell English version, I really don't know..... and some brands don't include international warranty....

Tangent
11-30-04, 03:46
on Dell's China website you can buy the computer with English operation system.
Dell.com.cn

Bill Lee
11-30-04, 22:06
Really want a great Ultraportable notebook?

Check out Fujitsu P7010 or P7010D (also called P7000) at http://webshop.fujitsupc.com/fpc/Ecommerce/PrdBridge.jsp?pclass=P


Nice. I just got one. What a beauty. 3.3 lbs, 60 Gig 72RPM HD and 1 Gig memory.

BTW, my friends has priced Toshiba and Dells in China and U.S. and wind up asking me to buy the notebooks for them in the U.S. and bring it back to them. Keep an eye out for Dell specials at www.gotapex.com.


Bill

Bill Lee
12-07-04, 14:07
I have booked at the resort Tian Fu Yuan. Looks good from their web site. Any body familar with this place and can give me some reports on this or nearby places?


Bill Lee

Peter
12-08-04, 09:53
Bill Lee,

Post the link. I can't find that hotel.

G Jetson
12-08-04, 11:16
you need the www in the address.

by the way, it's all in chinese. the english part is under construction.

Philo
12-16-04, 14:57
Hi

I live in BKK teaching math in an international university program. I think I have an opportunity to go to Shanghai doing the same thing fall semester 05.

In BKK this is my monthly budget:

Salary Baht 30 k net = 750 USD = (ca.) 6000 RMB (lecturing only 5 hours a week)

Guesthouse room ca. 16 square meters with daily cleaning Baht 9 k = 225 USD = RMB 18-1900

Morning coffe, newspapers, food Baht 9 k = 225 USD = RMB 18-1900

Short time twice a week Baht 8 k = USD 200 = 16-1700 RMB

Other expences paid by savings in my home country.

Will I be able to have a life in Shanghai? (I've read all the posts: local salary 5000 - prof. expat 80000 (tax calculations), BBS 130 - testing guy donates 4000 etc. But I would like to have more direct opinions ...)

Thanks

Kunshan
12-17-04, 07:29
Dear Philo,

Firstly as a person who has lived in China for 8 years and just started to visit Thailand for work and fun recently, my advice is "Stay the fk in Thailand"

But if you are interested to expereince China then here are some comparisons in cost. Shanghai is the most expensive city in Mainland China (or perhaps in whole "China"). And the city provides a wide choice of p4p and freebies of all colours.

But as a lifestyle choice, and especially if you don't speak Chinese, then I think Thailand wins.

Also remember that Shanghai apartments normally don't have heating so you will be cold as hell especially coming from Thailand, Shanghai summers are hot and very humid, no problem for you though.

Prices for almost everything seem cheaper in Thailand, but of course BBS at 200rmb (about 920Baht) is quite reasonable, but a girl in a bar will cost anwhere from 400-1000rmb. And expat (or popular) bars in SH tend to be very expensive (paying 50rmb for a beer is not out of the ordinary)


I am not living in Shanghai at the moment so these are just rough estimates below: see the ****
-------------------
In BKK this is my monthly budget:

Salary Baht 30 k net = 750 USD = (ca.) 6000 RMB (lecturing only 5 hours a week)
****For a Chinese this is great, for a foreigner who wants to live in a cheaper apartment and not spend much money and eat simply this is just OK.

Guesthouse room ca. 16 square meters with daily cleaning Baht 9 k = 225 USD = RMB 18-1900
***** A local apartment can cost anything from a few thousand RMB a month to XXXX This may be your biggest expense, a maid is a couple of hundered RMB if she only cleans your place a few times a week.

Morning coffe, newspapers, food Baht 9 k = 225 USD = RMB 18-1900
****In China you can buy the China Daily for 1rmb, its short, full of crap and not worth the money, a Newspaper from overseas is expensive and not on every street corner. Food is cheap if you want Chinese food every day. Western food is relativly expensive.

Hope that helps!

OldAsiaHand
12-17-04, 09:49
Philo,

IMHO, you will not have much of a life in Shanghai on US$750 per month. It is much more expensive that BKK. Having said that, it would not be impossible to survive.

Did I read your post correctly? You are paying US$100 for ST in BKK? Or, is it 8X for 200$?

OAH

Philo
12-17-04, 14:39
OAH

Thanks for the advice.

It's 8x1000 Baht = 200 USD.

In Pattaya and upcountry you can have ST for 2-500 Baht - but I am too lazy to go. And I only fuck quality 18-22 yo - so B1000 for a chick that gets 3-5000 baht from a Japanese or a Singaporian is a fair deal for me.

I think I will go China anyway...

Philo
12-17-04, 17:59
Thank you very much Changshu

I understand I will be 'poor'. But I will go for the experience. BKK is now my backyard - and I am bored - I am too lazy to use what it offers (it's routine already). I need something new ...

Ph

Master Monger
12-17-04, 18:43
Philo, I am sure you will love China, but I would recommend you pick a different city, if you don't want to be poor.

I lived in Xi'an for about 2 years and loved it, also I like, Chongqing, and ShenZhen but Xi'an is by far the cheapest and offers the largest LaoWai or Wow you are a Foriegner effect. Also Xi'an is super safe and the people are nice...if you speak Chinese. You can find similar paying teaching jobs in any one of these cities.

Xi'an - P4P is 50-250 RMB ($6-28) for short time and 300-1000 RMB ($35-115) for all night, but frankly it is very easy to pick up Freebies anywhere if you learn the language. Also, 1 hour massage is 35-150 RMB ($4-17)

Chongqing is a touch more...

ShenZhen is more, but less than Shanghai and almost equal for the amount of beautiful girls.

Happy Mongering,

Master Monger

Penney
12-19-04, 19:48
I heard that people don't tip in China? I.E. restaurants, taxi, haircuts etc is this true?

Thanks

Homo Sapian
12-22-04, 03:32
Yes, most time you do not need to pay.

Esp for resturant.


I heard that people don't tip in China? I.E. restaurants, taxi, haircuts etc is this true?

Thanks

OldAsiaHand
12-22-04, 11:33
Penney,

The only place that tips are expected is for our hobby!

OAH

Master Monger
12-25-04, 23:25
I lived in Xi'an for almost 2 years and they would almost get insulted when I tried to tip. Except the hookers, but then, they have a little different moral make-up. I was even able to get most of the restaurants to give me discounts, CHINA RULES!!

Penney
12-27-04, 00:53
I'm about to go on a long 4 month journey to China. I just want to make sure what to pack, a lot of clothing or just buy it there? I will be in a pretty 'warm' location, Nanjing area. I know I'll need shoes, shirts, jackets etc but should I bring a lot of luggage or buy?

How is the quality? I'm not a name brand junkie so I don't need Armani stuff or large logos on the outside.

Thanks

Santa
12-27-04, 03:49
To Penney,

After passing through passport control and entering China, going from Hongkong to Shenzhen, you will immediately arrive at a big shopping center. Their are watchs, belts, shoes, shirts, bags, suits, DVD and so on. Much of it is good quality at very cheap prices. Bargain hard!!! Walk away, they will keep calling you back.

Western quality electronics are not cheap.

Brain Damaged
12-27-04, 05:15
I'm about to go on a long 4 month journey to China. I just want to make sure what to pack, a lot of clothing or just buy it there? I will be in a pretty 'warm' location, Nanjing area. I know I'll need shoes, shirts, jackets etc but should I bring a lot of luggage or buy?

How is the quality? I'm not a name brand junkie so I don't need Armani stuff or large logos on the outside.

ThanksHey Penney,

I would just buy luggage and clothes in China and keep/dispose as you go along.

But, Nanjing warm? If you are not in a reasonable hotel or better, there is no heat south of the Yangtze in the winter!

Cheers,

BD

The Master
12-27-04, 05:35
Hi Penney

Nanjing going to be cold.

but, I think everything can be bought, so no need to bring too much stuff,

If it is shanghai, I know a market place that you can virtually get in naked, get out with all the brand names on you, with the cost of 10% of its original cost of those brand names.

TM

OldAsiaHand
12-27-04, 08:18
Penney,

I don't know where you live, but I would reckon that the vast majority of the shoes and clothing you can buy at home are already made in China.

OAH

Lilojo
12-27-04, 13:38
Penney:
OAH is correct. I often bring some old clothes to start with. I will throw those out after I buy new stuff. Everything can be had for a fraction of the price at home.
The only caveat: be sure of the size. In other words, Chinese XL is like M or L in North America. I need XXL in China and sometimes, the label is also wrong or plain different.
So if you are a medium at home, you are safe to buy there. If you are a XXL then bring more since you might not easily find really cheap stuff that fits.

Levitian
12-28-04, 10:18
Penney,
Nanjing is one of the hottest places in China (one of the 4 furnaces) during the summer season, but can be very, very cold in winter (as it is right now).
To give you an idea: Shanghai is about 300 kilometers south of Nanjing, today it is about 0 degrees Celsius and snowing.
Levitian

Batman
01-03-05, 07:54
I am being told that you can no longer get One year multiple entry "F" visas for an Americans. The longest is 6 months. Canadian, Austrailian, Brits, most Europeans no problem but American only 6 months
Is this true?
If not please get me the Contact information for any company that offers One year multiple entry "F" visa for an American.
I am trying to help a friend that visa will expire in 2 days

Thanks

Brain Damaged
01-03-05, 09:14
I am being told that you can no longer get One year multiple entry "F" visas for an Americans. The longest is 6 months. Canadian, Austrailian, Brits, most Europeans no problem but American only 6 months
Is this true?
If not please get me the Contact information for any company that offers One year multiple entry "F" visa for an American.
I am trying to help a friend that visa will expire in 2 days

ThanksBatman,

You are correct. One year "F" visas are no longer given to US Passport holders. The maximum is six months.

I am in Hong Kong. Travel agents here can do an "F" visa in one-day. YMMV depending one where you are.

Cheers,
BD

Soujourn
01-03-05, 10:39
I currently live in Tokyo and have to reapply my 'F' Visa every 6mo! Best is to go through travel agent - as when I go directly to Embassy they always issue 'L' or 'F' with only 90days instead of 6mo. If you have official invitation letters and proof of business from Chinese provincial government office, then you can get 'F' 6mo at embassy.

As for clothes and accessories for short term trip in China.

1) Given that dry cleaning a single shirt costs more than purchasing a nice one in China ... I buy dozens when I'm there and donate them back in Tokyo.

2) Cashmere of various quality is great price in China. Good for the cool/cold weather now happening and nice to take back to northern places.

3) If you are going to do alot of walking, wear your best walking shoes. Streets and surfaces are rougher in China, therefore the soles wear quicker. Typically cheap chinese shoes are, well, cheap!

4) As mentioned earlier, go the large multi-markets and bargain your heart out. If you don't walk away from the deal at least 3times, you aren't respected as a shopper -- and aren't getting a good deal. No matter how ridiculous the first 'special price' is -- start about 5 to 10x lower. For example:
'Pleather Jacket of some brand quality' = 800RMB - offer 100RMB
'Cashmere Shirt of some brand quality' = 400RMB - offer 50RMB

5) Don't bring your good luggage -- except your personal essentials in carry-on. Then you can buy another 'brand luggage' in China to take back your booty. And save time on the transit into China. You can also get those cheap plastic 'pack it home' bags so popular with the chinese. I favor my old Hartmann which looks beat up , but anyone in the know, knows its one of the most rugged bags out there!

6) Unless you really need it - I dont suggest to bring your good laptops. 3 of mine have died in China. Power surges, travel incidents and humongus virus infections. Now I just take an old small laptop just to manage emails/web.

7) Personal items. Most everything is available in China, but if you are a newbie it could get difficult to get your favorite sundries and medicines. If you have any prescriptions - bring those and with copy of the prescription to prove they are legit.

S.

p.s. it's cold in China right now! MicroFibre underwear is great - and dries quickly after a washout in the hotel sink!

Kinesics
01-03-05, 23:54
I (holding US passport) have obtained several Chinese visas from Chinese embassy in Washington D.C. through a passport service agency. Each visa application has been supported by an invitation letter from a Chinese business or a local government.

First few were F visa with two entries for six months. Then next one was F visa with multiple entries for six months. Then next one was F visa with two entries for one year period.

Then most recent one which I have received last week was F visa with multiple entries for one year period. This visa application was submitted with an invitation from the city government in where my business is located and the invitation letter specifically request multiple entries and minimum of one year visa period.

Therefore, you still can get F visa with multiple entries for one year visa period provided your passport proves your frequent travels to China and credible invitation letter from government authority or agency is provided.

Hope this information helps!

Mock A Bee
01-04-05, 06:46
I heard that people don't tip in China? I.E. restaurants, taxi, haircuts etc is this true?

ThanksPenney,

No tipping in China for anything!

Absolutely no tipping anyone except for working girls. Hired help in restaurants can get fired for accepting tips. Even in "five star" hotels in China, tipping is not necessary, though they like the Western practice.

MAB

Batman
01-04-05, 09:57
Thanks guys for all your help.

Brain Damaged,
HOW much for that 6 month F mutiple entry from your Travel agent?
Also the contact info for the Travel Agency, My friend will be in HK tomorrow.

Travel Dog
01-04-05, 16:15
I got a one year business visa recently at the China consulate in Houston, TX. You can FEDEX your passport to local travel agents who can walk it through in a few days or even one day if it is an emergency. You must have traveled to China many times before and be able to show the old visas to get the one year business visa. I think with extra work you can still get a two year visa but it takes extra documentation and about a week and lots of previous travel.

In Hong Kong I think 6 months is all your can get.

TD

Brain Damaged
01-05-05, 01:59
Thanks guys for all your help.

Brain Damaged,
HOW much for that 6 month F mutiple entry from your Travel agent?
Also the contact info for the Travel Agency, My friend will be in HK tomorrow.Batman,

PM Sent.

BD

Intransit
01-08-05, 09:05
Saturday, January 8, 2005
US and Beijing to ease travel with 12-month visas

SHI TING

China and the United States have agreed to a reciprocal visa arrangement under which both sides will offer 12-month, multiple-entry business and tourist visas, the US embassy in Beijing said yesterday.

US embassies and consulates "will begin issuing to otherwise qualified Chinese citizens who wish to visit the United States temporarily for business or pleasure visas that are valid for 12 months and multiple entries", the embassy said in a press release on its website.

The previous maximum validity of US visas for these purposes was six months. Americans would enjoy the same privileges on visits to the mainland, the statement added.

Diplomatic notes on the agreement, which goes into effect on January 15, were exchanged by the two sides last month.

The mutual extension would be a significant benefit to frequent travellers between the two countries, the statement said. But according to officials from the US embassy, the new visa policy does not mean an overall relaxation of America's strict visa application procedures.

"The new policy best serves those frequent fliers between the two countries, but for many first-time applicants, they still have to go through every detail of the application process," an official from the US embassy in Beijing said.

It would be wrong to assume the US had compromised its visa requirements for Chinese citizens, she added.

The statement said "the longer validity of visas means these frequent travellers will not have to renew their visas so frequently, saving time and money and making travel more convenient".

Most Chinese applicants will still have to schedule face-to-face interviews with US visa officers, and the controversial fingerprinting measure adopted in March is still in place.

The US adopted tougher visa rules in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorism attacks on New York and Washington, which made it more difficult for Chinese citizens to enter the country.

From last March, the US embassy in China began fingerprinting all Chinese visa applicants as part of Washington's global anti-terrorism moves.

China's Foreign Ministry claimed the measure "infringed on Chinese citizens' dignity and privacy". In retaliation, Beijing tightened rules for issuing visas to US citizens, including higher fees and the introduction of interviews.

The security benefits derived from the visa restrictions have had unwanted economic side effects, and corporate America has complained its interests have been hurt by the fewer trips by Chinese businessmen because of the entry restrictions.

In a recent report released by the USA-China Chamber of Commerce, 30 per cent of 254 American companies surveyed said the visa restrictions had had a "negative impact" on their business. A further 10 per cent said the economic impact was "highly negative".

Mock A Bee
01-13-05, 03:23
anyone have trouble with taking pirated dvd's back to the us lately? i know someone who had their dvd's confirep001ed at us customs in november 2004.

this is the first time i have ever heard of anyone having any dvd's confirep001ed. i understand they can levy a $20 per disc fine, though any fines totaling less than $10,000 they don't bother.

would appreciate hearing from anyone with solid knowledge on the subject.

mab

Wanabee
01-15-05, 16:32
Yo Mockabee,

For what it is worth, I flew into lax from beijing the day after xmas. I had about 8 dvds in my checked luggage. My bag had a US sticker on it that said it had been opened for inspection (I think for security purposes). The DVDs were still in it. Customs didn't look at my luggage.

Thanks again for giving me a glimpse of the Beijing scene. Your a good man.

Mock A Bee
01-19-05, 09:08
Thank you for your information on the DVD's.

You are welcome! Please let me know when you visit again.

MAB

Scorpio33
01-30-05, 14:20
Hi All,

There was an article recently in the <a href="http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-01/08/content_407095.htm" target="_blank">China Daily</a> regarding new visa policies between the U.S. and China which are quite a bit more lenient. Intransit also posted about this several days ago as well. Anyway, these new policies were to have taken effect on January 15th.

I have since checked with a couple of different travel agents in Hong Kong, and I was told there was no such policy in effect. My regular travel agent claimed to have verified with the Chinese consulate and was told there have not been any recent changes with the visa situation regarding U.S. passport holders.

So, what's the real scoop here? Can anyone confirm or deny if the situation has really changed?

Thanks!

Pac Blue

Diver98
02-19-05, 05:16
anyone have trouble with taking pirated dvd's back to the us lately? i know someone who had their dvd's confirep001ed at us customs in november 2004.
mabi always take some back with me, 1st time i was a bit paranoid, took them out of the wrappers & put them in a little cd case, after that i just put them in the luggage (not right on top of course). i never bring in more than 20 or so, never more than 1 of each title, so it's pretty clear these are for purely personal use.

Night Dragon
03-03-05, 03:38
It is now possible for US citizens to get a 2-year multiple entry visa to China, each entry valid for 90-day stay.

The most you could get before was a 1-year multiple entry visa for 30-day stays each time.

You can get the 2-year visa at the local Chinese consulate in your US city. Costs $150. You will need to show that you got 2 previous multiple entry visas.


Hi All,

There was an article recently in the <a href="http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-01/08/content_407095.htm" target="_blank">China Daily</a> regarding new visa policies between the U.S. and China which are quite a bit more lenient. Intransit also posted about this several days ago as well. Anyway, these new policies were to have taken effect on January 15th.

I have since checked with a couple of different travel agents in Hong Kong, and I was told there was no such policy in effect. My regular travel agent claimed to have verified with the Chinese consulate and was told there have not been any recent changes with the visa situation regarding U.S. passport holders.

So, what's the real scoop here? Can anyone confirm or deny if the situation has really changed?

Thanks!

Pac Blue

Bill Lee
03-03-05, 20:36
BNC;

Where are you running this ad? I got to try it too.

Bill


By the way.. I am running an ad for married woman who want something on the side.

It may surprise you but I am getting alot of reply.

blanknamecruiser

Bill Lee
03-03-05, 20:41
Night Dragon.

I've been getting two entries for 90 days stay at least since 2000. And that's from a Chinese consulate at a major US city.

But are you referring to getting the same in HK?

Bill




It is now possible for US citizens to get a 2-year multiple entry visa to China, each entry valid for 90-day stay.

The most you could get before was a 1-year multiple entry visa for 30-day stays each time.

You can get the 2-year visa at the local Chinese consulate in your US city. Costs $150. You will need to show that you got 2 previous multiple entry visas.

Moody
03-04-05, 03:30
He's talking about multiple entries, not just 2. Multiple entry visas allow you to enter as many times as you wish during the validity period of the visa. Recently, the best you could get was a 6 month multiple entry visa with each entry good for 30 days. It was possible to get a 1 year multiple entry visa with a local government invitation. If this is the new policy, then it's very good for those of us who make frequent trips. Since my current visa will expire in May, I may pre-emptively get a new one in HK.



Night Dragon.

I've been getting two entries for 90 days stay at least since 2000. And that's from a Chinese consulate at a major US city.

But are you referring to getting the same in HK?

Bill

Brain Damaged
03-04-05, 04:34
He's talking about multiple entries, not just 2. Multiple entry visas allow you to enter as many times as you wish during the validity period of the visa. Recently, the best you could get was a 6 month multiple entry visa with each entry good for 30 days. It was possible to get a 1 year multiple entry visa with a local government invitation. If this is the new policy, then it's very good for those of us who make frequent trips. Since my current visa will expire in May, I may pre-emptively get a new one in HK.Hi Fellow Mongerers,

I checked with my Travel Agents here in Hong Kong and they say that they can obtain one-year multi's, 30-day stay for US passport holders. (Updated from just a few months ago when I could only get a six-month multi.)

NB: the above is with no paperwork, so YMMV depending on what additional documents you want to submit and your location.

Cheers,

BD

Csun213
03-04-05, 06:01
He's talking about multiple entries, not just 2. Multiple entry visas allow you to enter as many times as you wish during the validity period of the visa. Recently, the best you could get was a 6 month multiple entry visa with each entry good for 30 days. It was possible to get a 1 year multiple entry visa with a local government invitation. If this is the new policy, then it's very good for those of us who make frequent trips. Since my current visa will expire in May, I may pre-emptively get a new one in HK.


I have just received a 2 entry visa good for 180 days and each entry is good for 60 days. Total cost is $75. Hope this information will help someone.

Cronin
03-04-05, 06:06
Pac Blue,

I don't know much about this, but for what its worth, I also read the news report that Intransit posted. Of course, what the US and China governments agree to do, and what they actually do are only faintly related to each other. Both governments are famous for saying one thing and then doing what ever the hell they want. Hmmm, reminds me of some people I know.

Case in point: last year the Chinese government grandly announced that the requirments for permenant residence status (the coveted green card) for foreigners would be greatly relaxed. Uh huh... sure. First of all, the new rules were only printed in Chinese (that's to make it easier for foreigners to apply). Second, the new green cards are only available in a few cities...I can't even apply for one in Guangzhou, even if I could read Chinese.

Maybe it will happen, maybe it won't, but don't hold your breath waiting for it. Patience takes on a whole new dimension in China, as any long time resident knows all too well. And visa policy changes move about as fast as a mamasan giving 50 yuan change from your 200.

Cronin

Kunshan
03-04-05, 06:19
Cronin,

Share your feelings on the Greencard issue, but you should check again because a friend has just submitted his application in Kunming and the rules are probably the same in GZ. However I think this is more a token gesture by the Chinese government, and is I beleive aimed at returning Chinese so that they can keep their newly aqquired foreign passports. I hear that about 5 greencards have been issued in Kunming.

However there are a few requirements that make it pretty tough, and I am not sure if my friends application will be approved or not.
One of the toughest criteria is you need: 4 years in a GM or DGM position in a company in an industry that the local government thinks is important.
Also you will need the local tax department to issue a statement that you have paid your taxes for the 4 years.
The other thing is that you will need a record from your home police saying you have no criminal records (this must be notified by your foreign affairs department and then by the closest Chinese embassy/Consulate).
Also if you have spent week/months out of China in the 4 years then probably you can't get it either.

Bill Lee
03-06-05, 06:00
Moody. My Bad.

Csun213. What they are talking about is probably over our head. Especially someone like me who visits the land of paradise once or twice a year.

I think I'm going to be just getting my 2-entry visa for the rest of my life.

Bill

Moody
03-06-05, 07:09
Bill Lee,

No problem. I just didn't want anyone getting confused.

I checked the China Embassy website and they do offer 2 year visas with invitation. There is however, a 15 day waiting period. I guess I'll ask for an invite from somebody.

As Brain Damaged has noted, in Hong Kong, invitation is not necessary for the 1 year visa. I usually get my visa in HK because it's less hassle. I just take it to a travel agent, pay the money, and have it back by 2:30 in the afternoon.

Nickkillla 1
03-06-05, 11:42
Hey all,

As one who just got upgraded I thought I would throw my 2 cents and knowledge in on the greencard topic. I am one of the lucky few who have received them. But as everything in China, the rules can be flexible depending on the Guan Xi you have. I currently am employed by the Chinese Ministry of Education, so having a few rules "changed on a per case basis" was easy. The only difference I have noticed in the "greencard" and a typical residence permit is that mine is valid over one year. I do not know if it is worth all the hassle to try and get one.

Lustforthrust
03-06-05, 18:02
I would have had over a 150X2 chops from the Chinese Immigration on my passport (in under 3 years) if I didn't have a Home Return Permit.

Bob Churn
03-06-05, 19:58
About the greencard issues, wondering it compared to normal Employment Pass holder in term of taxation and others like the social welfare payment.

Is greencard holder need to pay all those social welfare, etc????

What are the real benefits except the duration to be valided working in China. If you lost the job, does the greencard cancelled accordinlgy???

Kunshan
03-07-05, 02:08
I am talking about a Permanent Resident Greencard, its a document that allows you to live in China with no need for visas for a work unit. I think it has to be extended every 5 years,,,but the main difference is that in theory (this is China) the PR status is linked to yourself and not your work unit, so when you are extending it you don't need a offcial work unit. So if you wanted to do your own biz then you would not need a supporting work unit for your application.

Nickkillla 1, How long is your greencard valid for? Is it a PR or just a normal greencard that runs for 2-3 years?

Cento
03-07-05, 05:51
Hello My Freinds
I Met 2 Girls In Hangzhou But Need Help With Language.
Please Someone Tell Me What Hi Gang Lai Mu Means.
Because I Need To Know What They Are Saying To Me .
Thanks Vndr

Troc
03-07-05, 07:55
Vander22,

Hi Gang Lai = Still willing to come. But the context in which it is normally used implies that previously you did not have a favorable experience but you are still willing to come. ex. Cosmo Kramer (of the Seinfeld sitcom) is afraid of clowns, but he is still willing to come to the opera to see Pagliacci.

Not sure what Mu means.

Troc

SE Asia Joe
03-07-05, 08:21
Hello My Freinds
I Met 2 Girls In Hangzhou But Need Help With Language.
Please Someone Tell Me What Hi Gang Lai Mu Means.
Because I Need To Know What They Are Saying To Me .
Thanks VndrJeez Vander22 - there's no way to even guess what they're saying :

1. Nobody can be quite sure what system of English romanization you are using

2. Remember the 4 different tones in Putonghua which can result in one word (to a western ear) meaning 4 different meanings

3. What context/situation these statements made.

You gotta give much much more details if anybody is gonna be able to help you out. Or why don't you just march your girls to somebody who can speak english there (the hotel receptionist?) to help you to translate i/o asking here - which at best can only be replied to within 24 hours.

Bill Lee
03-08-05, 07:23
Just ask them to write it on a piece of paper or if you have phone camera, take a pic of their writing and upload to someone here or as SEAJ suggested, bring it to your hotel to translate.


Bill



Jeez Vander22 - there's no way to even guess what they're saying :

1. Nobody can be quite sure what system of English romanization you are using

2. Remember the 4 different tones in Putonghua which can result in one word (to a western ear) meaning 4 different meanings

3. What context/situation these statements made.

You gotta give much much more details if anybody is gonna be able to help you out. Or why don't you just march your girls to somebody who can speak english there (the hotel receptionist?) to help you to translate i/o asking here - which at best can only be replied to within 24 hours.

Cento
03-08-05, 08:42
Thanks Guys .

I Guess Its Not What I Hoped It Would Be I Thought Gang
Was Maybe In English . But No..... I Guess They Are More Innosent Than I Thought.

Really Thanks A Lot And It Lools Like There Wont Be Some Intresting Post For Me In Hangzhou

Papadum
03-08-05, 11:40
Hello My Freinds
I Met 2 Girls In Hangzhou But Need Help With Language.
Please Someone Tell Me What Hi Gang Lai Mu Means.
Because I Need To Know What They Are Saying To Me .
Thanks Vndr


SE Asia Joe:
Are you kidding? Do you think Vander would know Chinese Pin Yin? It must be his standard English pronounciation.

Vander:

I think it should be:
Hi = still
gang = follow
lai = come
Mu = ?

In Chinese Pinyin system, it should pronounce as "Hai gen lai ma?" Meaning: Do you still wanna come?

Was there any negotiation of money, or location or whatever? They just want to know if you will give it a go.

Just my guess pal.

Hello2003
03-10-05, 10:42
Well the guy said he just met the girls. They could be asking him "Ni gang lai ma?"

Which would be a question, literally: You just arrive/come?

Comrade 2255
03-11-05, 08:11
Hey guys,

Know any shops in Shanghai with a good range of DVD movies Doesn't matter if they have Chinese sub-titles that can't be disabled via the menu, as long as they're cheap cheap cheap.

TIA.

Papadum
03-11-05, 11:09
Well the guy said he just met the girls. They could be asking him "Ni gang lai ma?"

Which would be a question, literally: You just arrive/come?


There you go Hello, I think you've got it correct>

Tequila Kid
03-12-05, 02:48
Reading some past post and noted questions about visa.

Here is my experience:

I am returning to China about every 4 - 6 weeks, so I have a 1 year multiple entry visa. Six-month multi entry visas are also offered.

I get these in Hong Kong. I am usually in a hurry (so I ask for expedited 4 hour processing offered at extra fee) and arrive in the weekend (so I get charged extra if its Sunday).

My routine is 8pm check in at Holiday Inn Golden Mile. Give my documents and photo to Concierge. Pay. The Concierge calls CTS (China Travel Service) and arranges the processing.
I pick up my doc's with new visa from the Concierge by noon the next day.

I don't remember exact cost, but around $300 due to expedite fee and holiday fee. Otherwise it should not cost much more than $200USD.

ER

Gaolei
03-12-05, 20:24
Go to 158 Jin Xian Lu. Go past the City Hotel on Shanxi Nan Lu toward Changle. Go past Julu, past the Mantou place (stop and buy some - delicious), next street on the left. Half way down on the left. The sign says Ka De Club. I think it is supposed to be an internet club. Go inside and there is a woman on a computer. Walk past her into the door on the right, go down the hall, first door on the right. You will find this secret place full of westerners.

They have a good selection of CDs and DVDs, some on the rack and others in the catalogs on the tables. Enjoy!

Tiger 888
03-22-05, 10:01
In Hong Kong there are 1 year mulyiple entry China Visas for available, obtainable whiithin 2 working days thy cost HK$ 750.

Same day express delivery (submit before 12, pickup at 6.30 pm) 950 HK$

Not workable for US passports.

There are some conditions depending on the passport. e.G. you must have been in China at least 3 times in the previous year to get a 1 year Visa, or one time to get a 6 months visa.
Depending on the passport, the visa may be valid for one full preiod of validity stay.

PM me with your details and I will answer you where to go.

Zorro32
03-23-05, 06:44
Hi Tiger 1,

Not workable for US passports only? Workable for all other countries? Or workable for some countries? Which countries?


In Hong Kong there are 1 year mulyiple entry China Visas for available, obtainable whiithin 2 working days thy cost HK$ 750.

Same day express delivery (submit before 12, pickup at 6.30 pm) 950 HK$

Not workable for US passports.

Zorro32
03-23-05, 08:19
Hi Tiger 1,

Not workable for US passports? Workable for all other countries? Or workable for which countries?


In Hong Kong there are 1 year mulyiple entry China Visas for available, obtainable whiithin 2 working days thy cost HK$ 750.

Same day express delivery (submit before 12, pickup at 6.30 pm) 950 HK$

Not workable for US passports.

Journey Ham
03-23-05, 09:01
Hello,

As a newcomer in this forum I asked this question in the end of my first travel comments but of course nobody found it there. Perhaps this is not the right place to ask neither but couldn't find better.

I travel often in China and sometimes I have a possibility to spend some extra days there. As flights are quite cheap it is possible to select where to go between working periods.

The question is, where to go. What is the best place in China when looking for beatifull girls and great sex with little effort. Of course there are a lot of girls in places like Beijing and Shanghai but I prefer a little bit smaller place where I can take a hotel in the middle of action.

Tiger 888
03-24-05, 08:05
OK, I have checked it out in detail:

Travel agents can't handle visa requests from the following countries:

USA, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh.

Tere is a long list of "reciprocal countries" (whatever that means), where the visa charges are significantly higher. But they vary from country to country:

Angola, Armenia, Belarus, Bolivia, Brazil, Great Britain, Cameroon, Chile, Congo, Ivorycoast, Equadore, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kasachstan, Moldavia, Netherlands, Panama, Ukraine, Usbekistan, Venezuela.

(Sorry for any possible misspelling)

Moreover US Passport Holders can't get the 5 day Visa on the Border at Shenzhen. I am not sure about Turkey, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

Because this is so complex, I suggest whoever needs to know, PM me and I let you have the contact of the Travel Agent.

Heel Lover
03-25-05, 03:10
Hi Tiger 1,

Not workable for US passports? Workable for all other countries? Or workable for which countries?After US requested to scan & record finger prints of Chinese who apply for US Visa, US passport holders got more restrictions here.

OldAsiaHand
03-25-05, 05:02
Hello,

As a newcomer in this forum I asked this question in the end of my first travel comments but of course nobody found it there. Perhaps this is not the right place to ask neither but couldn't find better.

I travel often in China and sometimes I have a possibility to spend some extra days there. As flights are quite cheap it is possible to select where to go between working periods.

The question is, where to go. What is the best place in China when looking for beatifull girls and great sex with little effort. Of course there are a lot of girls in places like Beijing and Shanghai but I prefer a little bit smaller place where I can take a hotel in the middle of action.

Journey Ham.

Chongqing is my reco. Gorgeous girls, easy to find, reasonable prices, excellent service. Check out the local thread for more details.

OAH

Comrade 2255
03-26-05, 08:40
Hey guys,

Where can I get a cheap pocket-sized electronic English-Chinese translator in Shanghai, to help with the transactions? Preferably one that can translate a whole sentence/phrase at once.

TIA

Douglas23
03-27-05, 05:04
Cannot vouch for the unit, but Pimsleur CD's are fantastic....

Here is site with both

http://www.cheappimsleur.com/chinese_mandarin

Sugar Baba
04-01-05, 00:09
Greetings forum members,

Need some advice on how to proceed with tempting opportunities that are afforded to me at the work place. As the "Laoban" I always find one or two female staff who are very eager to get ahead.

One in partiular has caught my attention. She works in our telephone sales department. Noticed she had been lingering after hours, always being one of the last to leave the office so that she could take the elevator with me. The subtle hints, and sometimes blatant body language makes it clear that she has every intention of sleeping with the boss. She is 21 and from Kunming. Has all the right equipment to work as a man-trap. I get a hard-on whenever she enters my office on the pretext of reporting on some departmental matter her supervisor can't resolve. She has recently been dropping by more frequently - picking up the pace - moving in for the kill.

I know trouble when I see it, but she is so so tempting, and appears to be so so willing to please.

The hell with consequences? Or is there some way I can have my cake and eat it too.

Any advice is appreciated.

Bill Lee
04-01-05, 00:57
Unless you're the top dog of the company and you have no girlfriends or wife that this employee can complain to.

If your exposed tryst will not cause problem for you at work or at home, I say go for it.

My 2 cents

Bill

Lkb528
04-01-05, 01:43
I agree with Bill, don't shit where you eat, especially in china.

Levitian
04-01-05, 03:11
Les Armes D'Une Femme ....

What do you think this girl wants from you, at the end of the day? Some little harmless, condition- and stringless after-work fun? Really??? You better take a good breath and think about it, again.

According to your description, this girl is following a plan with a clear target. Watch out. I have seen quite a few falling in such a trap here in China, and it will come with a price tag, sure as hell burns.

My 2 cents ... .

Levitian

Papadum
04-01-05, 06:51
Greetings forum members,

Need some advice on how to proceed with tempting opportunities that are afforded to me at the work place. As the "Laoban" I always find one or two female staff who are very eager to get ahead.

One in partiular has caught my attention. She works in our telephone sales department. Noticed she had been lingering after hours, always being one of the last to leave the office so that she could take the elevator with me. The subtle hints, and sometimes blatant body language makes it clear that she has every intention of sleeping with the boss. She is 21 and from Kunming. Has all the right equipment to work as a man-trap. I get a hard-on whenever she enters my office on the pretext of reporting on some departmental matter her supervisor can't resolve. She has recently been dropping by more frequently - picking up the pace - moving in for the kill.

I know trouble when I see it, but she is so so tempting, and appears to be so so willing to please.

The hell with consequences? Or is there some way I can have my cake and eat it too.

Any advice is appreciated.

Danger! danger! red light's on....

she might not be in love with you but in love with your authority. She might want to be the department manager in one months, or she might be having a big mouth telling other colleagues that she has a special relationship with you..... a way to have a status in the office.

This is China, and this is their culture. Don't do that in the office.

If she really has an eye on you and if she's really, really hot to you. Fire her and pay her double as long as you want her.(again, this is China, what's the big deal!)

Papadum
04-01-05, 07:09
Unless you're the top dog of the company and you have no girlfriends or wife that this employee can complain to.

If your exposed tryst will not cause problem for you at work or at home, I say go for it.

My 2 cents

Bill


even top dog, there goes the integrities.....

Sugar Baba
04-01-05, 07:43
Damn she looks good. She is sitting right in front of me as I type this message.

She knows I have been drinking. I have my xiao erguotuo and bottle of yanjing piju during lunch. Self-control and resistance level is low and she knows it. She's brushing back her hair and taking deep breaths which cause her ample bosom to swell and burst through her low cut sweater top - clinging to those melons.

Gentlemen, thank you for your advice. I hope to eat this piece of cake. Definitely will cause problems if I do. I think I need to fire this little beauty and keep her for awhile as my mistress.

But of course, herein lies the problem. There is something about being able to have sex in the office. Its all about power and privilege, and the high that comes with playing this particular game. I imagine Clinton must have felt somewhat like this as he had Monica give him head in the Oval Office. It just isn't the same having sex in a hotel or apartment - somewhere safe and secure. Its this combination of danger, risk, power (position), and desperation (on her part) that makes office sex so tantalizing.

Today is Friday, what to do. She's crossing her long legs and flashing her panties. She's inviting me out for a drink after work. Very aggressive indeed for a mere 21 yr old.

BBS, saunas, outcall, karoake - all are fine but they can't compare to the danger of what is before me. Which leads me to a related point. I have been in China long enough now to get to the point where I am feeling a bit bored by the run of unending bodies that can be had so easily through the various outlets. Not sure if any of you gentlemen are feeling the same. I see now how one can become more and more perverse and exotic in their tastes as the in and out becomes almost routine at times.

I'm a little drunk.

Maybe just a little adolescent heavy petting? Or just a BJ? No penetration minimizes the potential damage?

Once again, thank you gentlemen for your shared advice.

Crossing her legs again.

OldAsiaHand
04-01-05, 13:33
Member #3062,

Forget about it!

Just my POV.

OAH

Bill Lee
04-01-05, 16:05
Well. That's what I mean. If integrities or anything else will be problem, then DON'T do it.

Remember if you foresee one little problem, then forget it.

Me, if I can do and get away with it, I would do it. I'm so weak.

Help me. Cronin Help me (in late July?) You too OAH. Help out this dirty old man here. Let's chip in and start a "quicky" company that just happens to open up for interviews for a "legitimate massage health spa" when I return and damn it, had to close up just when I'm leaving.

Bill



even top dog, there goes the integrities.....

Seahorse
04-01-05, 22:13
Does anybody know a cheap apartment / sublet in CQ? like 500 - 1000 RMB a month?

Sugar Baba
04-05-05, 01:02
My Kunming beauty tastes as good as she looks. Engaged in a little 69, rimming, and russian finished off on her sweet melons. All on my office couch. Very satisfying.

After a few more office sessions, will give her a pink slip and a fur lined Fendi hand bag she saw in the Guomao shopping mall.

Need to work on my self-control. But as you gentlemen may know, Spring and warm weather is here. The young beauties are shedding their thick winter clothing for the sheer see through fabrics that are such a pleasure to brush and rub against. Beijing girls are just getting prettier and more sophisticated with each passing year.

So many bodies so little time.

Mock A Bee
04-06-05, 13:02
IMHO

I have had my fair share of temptations to have sex with co-workers and let me tell you - it is the most tempting sex! I have had the right mind to avoid it, and I suggest you don't have sex with anyone at work. But boy is it TOUGH to resist!

I know, I know, it is risque and thrilling sex with nubile hotties - and you see these girls every day! That is hard especially if you can bang her in the office.

But, if you don't want people talking about you and unless you are the laoban, you take a risk with your job and wife if you are married.

I dont' recommend it myself, no matter how tempting, but those of you with the balls to do so who are going to poke the office girls anyway, please continue to tell us about your trists! At least the rest of us can get a vicarious thrill out of it.

Keep up the hot office sex!

Regards, MAB

OldAsiaHand
04-06-05, 15:47
Sugar Baba,

For your sake, I hope it only costs you the bag. Sorry to play the devils advocate, but it could be much more expensive and get nasty in the end. I am thoroughly convinced that the vast majority of Chinese girls don't give it up just because you are a nice guy. More often, than not, there are ulterior motives involved. Let's hope this case is an exception and I am proven wrong.

Just my POV.

Good Luck!

OAH

P.S. Please keep us posted.

Sugar Baba
04-21-05, 02:34
Been having some of the best sex ever. Office sex is just too good. I can call in my Kunming beauty and get a nice BJ anytime during the day. Of course, she wants much more than the purse. Am going to take her to Shanghai over the 5/1 holiday for the first of probably many more shopping sprees to come. Up to now, she is worth it. Hard to meet up with a young luscious beauty who truly enjoys all aspects of sex. Love my little nymph.

I know I will eventually get tired of her, however. Will need to work on a good exit strategy that won't be too painful. Until then, I'm going to make sure we try every possible position on office couch and recliner.

Mock A Bee
04-21-05, 08:21
Sugar Baba,

Glad you are still getting some! Do you think your Kunming Hottie would mind if you took some pictures? Please post if she doesn't mind.

Not that I am one to talk, but OAH does have a point. Just be sure you have a rock solid exit strategy.

Maybe taking pictures can help ensure you some security on your part. Not that it would be fair, but you could take pictures and "threaten" to show them to everyone in the office if she doesn't want to leave willingly.

Good luck!

MAB

EZ Street
04-22-05, 03:02
Offbeat News

Thursday, April 21, 2005

Chinese Men Measure Up to Others Below the Belt HONG KONG (Reuters) - Chinese men have no reason to feel inferior about the size of their penises, according to a Hong Kong study which showed local men measured up to others elsewhere in the world below the belt.

"Our conclusion is that Hong Kong people are no smaller than Western men, where their penises are concerned, " said Chan Lung-wai, director of the Urology Center at the Union Hospital, who headed the study.

"There has always been the myth that westerners have bigger penises and their (sexual) ability is better. "

A group of scientists in Hong Kong spent five months from October last year measuring 148 ethnic Chinese volunteers aged between 23 and 93.

The average length of their flaccid penises was 3. 33 inches, which compared favorably with similar studies on other men overseas.

Germans have average lengths of about 3. 4 inches, Israelis 3. 27 inches, Turks 3. 07 inches and Filippinos 2. 89 inches. Italians were the longest at 3. 54 inches, and Americans averaged 3. 46 inches.

The study did not measure the penises when they were erect.

It found that a man's height bore no relation to the length of his member, but those with higher body mass indexes, or fat content, appeared to have shorter penises.

"It seems that as someone gets older and fatter, his blood vessels change, so the penile size is not static. It may be a reflection of the condition of the person's blood vessels, " Chan said, adding that this could spur yet another study.

Juno Audio
04-22-05, 10:44
EZ Street,

Very interesting study. Good post

Diamond Head
04-22-05, 17:41
Well, if they didn't measure them erect what good is the study? I'm sure many Western mongers reading this have had responses from their girls such as "Tai da le" and so on. Too big. And they've heard the word "xiao" applied to the Chinese man, small. I'm not being critical of the Asian equipment or Asians generally, just that this survey is typical China Daily government propaganda.

Mock A Bee
04-25-05, 13:55
I was wondering if anyone else come across crazy Americans who insist on tipping in China. I don't mean tipping your little hottie for giving a great GFE, I mean like in restaurants and taxi drivers.

I have come across people that insist on doing this and it absolutley bugs the hell out of me! These people are usually Americans.

Tipping isn't the practice, and China does not have a developed service industry. I think it is arogantly bestowing a Western practice on China which simply does not practice tipping the service staff. In fact service staff have told me that they can get fired for accepting tips. Try tipping in Australia and you can get your head torn off!

Unless you are in a Hotel, where a service charge is automatically added to your restaurant tab and that service charge is just extra mark-up, the staff does not usually get to share the service charge.

One person I know actually tips taxi drivers because she thinks she will teach them one by one that you will get extra money if you give good service. This is beside the fact that she can't speak any mandarin and can't explain what it is she is doing. I think this is complete BS.

This same person also tips because it "makes her feel good" (she literally said this to me). How F**k**g arrogant can you get? (She has a full expat package, been in China all of five months) Because she knows taxi drivers in Beijing make a very meager living she wants to help them out by throwing money at them! Not all of them make meager livings, especially the ones in Beijing who prey on unsuspecting foreigners at the airport.

Quite frankly doling out a few extra kuai here and there whenever you ride a taxi to make you feel good is NOT how you help people out. Help train people so they have marketable skills that command higher wages - that is how you can help people out.

Anyway, I was wondering how others feel about foreigners tipping in China.

MAB

Chop Sticks
04-25-05, 18:37
Yup,

Actually Taxi Drivers in China do extremly good. They make more cash then most other chinese people working in China.

Americans sometimes have problems to understand and learn different culture.
But that also goes for "tourist groups" from all over the world.

Moody
04-26-05, 05:42
I don't care what other foreigners do. If they want to tip cab drivers, that's fine. I don't do it though. I think most of them don't realize though, that the recipients are rarely grateful. If anything, they call them idiots behind their backs.

Frank Booth
04-29-05, 04:55
Well, if they didn't measure them erect what good is the study? I'm sure many Western mongers reading this have had responses from their girls such as "Tai da le" and so on. Too big. And they've heard the word "xiao" applied to the Chinese man, small. I'm not being critical of the Asian equipment or Asians generally, just that this survey is typical China Daily government propaganda.

Maybe a new study should be commissioned using Karaoke girls as research associates.

Sammy_T
04-29-05, 10:13
You can flame me all you want, but I give small tips in China, even though I have been her for over 10 years and know it is not the norm. I will tip a taxi driver if I am within walking distance of some place and I am just to damn lazy to walk it, or if I need to go to an area of the city that taxis don't normally go to. I don't believe I will change the general cabbie population one driver at a time, but I do think if I give him a small tip he will be more likely to pick up a foreigner next time. In addition, cabbies tend to work certain areas. Even in this huge city I have gotten the same cabbie multiple times, and they always provide me with good service.

True story - I once stumbled out of maggies alone, fell into a cab, and fell asleep. When the driver woke me I was in front of my house. I can only assume he had taken me home before and remember me. He certainly earned an extra 20 RMB. (and yes, I know this was stupid and dangerous)

I also give small tips to the bell boys at the hotel when they take my bag to the room. They tend to be the connection to everything in the local area, and are always full of good advice. When I go down to ask them for a favor (hey, run across the street and pick me up a pint of ice cream), or for information, they always remember me and are more then happy to help - without expecting an additional tip.

I also tip bar tenders. When I am ready for another beer I don't want to stand at the bar waving my hand waiting for them to notice me. I want them to watch me and get me my drink when I am ready. In the states I tip a dollar per drink, here I'll tip 10 RMB per round.

One of the reasons I live in China is because they treat me like I am a king. They do this because any white foreigner is perceived as rich. I know that. So what? If I can drop a little extra money here and there and actually receive improved service, then I think it is money well spent.

Sammy