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Admin
01-01-08, 02:00
Thread Starter.

Punter 127
06-18-08, 11:02
I extended my 21 day visa to 59 days (first extension) by taking my passport to a travel agent in Cebu (ATJ travels & tours) I dropped my passport off one day and picked it up the next afternoon, the total cost was P3202.00 they gave me the following break down of cost along with receipts.

Application fee 1000.00
Visa waiver fee 500.00
Legal research 30.00
Bi clearance 500.00
Express lane 500.00

Sub total 2530.00

ATJ fee 600.00
Vat 72.00

Total P3202. 00


IMHO P672.00 to have the agency handle this is money well spent.

Thanks for the thread Jackson, here’s a repost about getting a Visa extension hopefully it will get this thread going, and others will offer advice and Visa information. BTW everyone please be advised you can NOT wear short pants in Government offices.

I guess I should also point out that I exited the Philippines without any problems with the Visa extension stamps in my passport, not even a second look.

Thanks

Gangles
06-18-08, 12:48
Has anyone applied for thee Business and Retirement visa lately?

What happened?

What are the requirements?

best wishes in anticipation.

Gangles

Darth Sushi
06-18-08, 15:22
Has anyone applied for thee Business and Retirement visa lately?

What happened?

What are the requirements?

best wishes in anticipation.

Gangles
My neighbor got a retirement Visa. You must be at least 50 yrs old to qualify for this one. Basically, the gov wants a $10,000 investment. You can put it in a local savings acct untouched or buy property like a condo. You'll get a special ID card and a sticker for your passport. Also, there is a minimum income that must be direct deposited (I think it's $800...not sure) to a PI bank monthly. There is a list of banks the gov has designated for the savings acct. My neighbor went to the Bank of Commerce in Angeles near 1st and MacArthur and they walked him through the entire procedure. My other neighbor tried the same thing with Equitable bank but that bank did not have a clue even though they are on the gov list. It took him about a month and you have to give them your passport during the application process. I talked with Bank of Commerce and they do have a retirement visa for the under 50 but it's a $50,000 investment! I'll have to wait few years. Please keep in mind they only recently, lowered the investment amount from $20,000. My friend got his about a year ago so my info may have changed. The person I talked to at Bank of Commerce is Claudette, acct manager. Good luck guys.

Member #4647
06-18-08, 21:37
Originally Posted by Punter 127

I extended my 21 day visa to 59 days (first extension) by taking my passport to a travel agent in Cebu (ATJ travels & tours) I dropped my passport off one day and picked it up the next afternoon, the total cost was P3202.00 they gave me the following break down of cost along with receipts.

Application fee 1000.00
Visa waiver fee 500.00
Legal research 30.00
Bi clearance 500.00
Express lane 500.00

Sub total 2530.00

ATJ fee 600.00
Vat 72.00

Total P3202. 00


IMHO P672.00 to have the agency handle this is money well spent.

If you give one of the immigration guys wearing uniforms inside a 1000 peso tip it will expedite it from 4 hours to 30 minutes.

Fastpiston
06-19-08, 12:49
My neighbor got a retirement Visa. You must be at least 50 yrs old to qualify for this one. Basically, the gov wants a $10,000 investment. You can put it in a local savings acct untouched or buy property like a condo. You'll get a special ID card and a sticker for your passport. Also, there is a minimum income that must be direct deposited (I think it's $800...not sure) to a PI bank monthly. There is a list of banks the gov has designated for the savings acct. My neighbor went to the Bank of Commerce in Angeles near 1st and MacArthur and they walked him through the entire procedure. My other neighbor tried the same thing with Equitable bank but that bank did not have a clue even though they are on the gov list. It took him about a month and you have to give them your passport during the application process. I talked with Bank of Commerce and they do have a retirement visa for the under 50 but it's a $50,000 investment! I'll have to wait few years. Please keep in mind they only recently, lowered the investment amount from $20,000. My friend got his about a year ago so my info may have changed. The person I talked to at Bank of Commerce is Claudette, acct manager. Good luck guys.

The time deposit requirement is $10,000 with a provable pension and $20,000 without a pension for persons over 50 years of age. There is a $1,400 application fee. There is also an annual investment fee of $500. One has to do some paperwork with the Authority annually. All details are on the Philippine Retirement Authority website. In contrast, a standard regular 59-day multiple entry visa valid for one year costs about $200.

Punter 127
10-31-08, 18:58
I’m planning to retire next year, I will have a pension and qualify for a retirement visa.

But I only plan to spend about 8 to 10 months a year in the RP.

So I’m looking for some advice, what would you do, go for the retirement visa or just keep extending the tourist visa?

I’m just trying to weigh all my options, I would like to hear the pros and cons of each type of visa, and would appreciate any advice you would care to offer.



Thanks,

Punter 127

Hesekiels
11-01-08, 13:02
I知 planning to retire next year, I will have a pension and qualify for a retirement visa.

So I知 looking for some advice, what would you do, go for the retirement visa or just keep extending the tourist visa?




Punter:

If I had to decide then I would opt for a tourist visa (which is easy to get and without problems extendable). According to my experience it is namely always quite a hassle to deal with the local authorities. So, better avoid it whenever possible! IMHO, of course!

Cheers!


Hesekiels

Punter 127
11-01-08, 19:45
Punter:

If I had to decide than I would opt for a tourist visa (which is easy to get and without problems extendable). According to my experience it is namely always quite a hassle to deal with the local authorities. So, better avoid it whenever possible! IMHO, of course!

Cheers!


HesekielsHi Hesekiels,

I tend to agree with you, I just wanted to makes sure I wasn’t missing something about the retirement visa.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Punter 127

Member #4537
11-01-08, 20:05
and they do have a retirement visa for the under 50 but it's a $50,000 investment!

Is there a minumum age? If you are 20 is this still okay? Is this applicable for all passports/nationalities?

Punter 127
11-01-08, 20:45
Is there a minumum age? If you are 20 is this still okay? Is this applicable for all passports/nationalities? I think you have to be 35 year old or older. I think this link has the info you're looking for, hope it’s helpful.

http://www.pra.gov.ph/main/srrv_program2/5?page=1

GoodEnough
11-02-08, 01:10
I知 planning to retire next year, I will have a pension and qualify for a retirement visa.

But I only plan to spend about 8 to 10 months a year in the RP.

So I知 looking for some advice, what would you do, go for the retirement visa or just keep extending the tourist visa?

I知 just trying to weigh all my options, I would like to hear the pros and cons of each type of visa, and would appreciate any advice you would care to offer.



Thanks,

Punter 127

I disagree with those who recommend the tourist visa. The standards needed to obtain a retirement visa have been lowered recently, and I think it only requires a $10,000 "investment," which means you can put this amount in a local bank, draw interest, and get the visa. It's reasonably simple to obtain. If you keep extending a tourist visa for months on end there's a possibility of problems arising with Immigration, and you do not want that hassle.

GE

LoveAsianWhores
11-02-08, 08:07
I知 planning to retire next year, I will have a pension and qualify for a retirement visa.

But I only plan to spend about 8 to 10 months a year in the RP.

So I知 looking for some advice, what would you do, go for the retirement visa or just keep extending the tourist visa?

I知 just trying to weigh all my options, I would like to hear the pros and cons of each type of visa, and would appreciate any advice you would care to offer.

Thanks,

Punter 127I went through this analysis with a friend a few months back. We got all the requirements from immigration and compared both. It was quite clear that a tourist visa was the way to go. You need to renew the tourist visa every two months, but any agency can do it for about a 500 peso tourist charge. You can stay in the country for up to 18 months before having to leave the country for at least 24 hours. The retirement visa has a bunch of requirements that are a hassle, and it is expensive. There are also a couple of things you have to do every year. And importantly, you are required to notify them in advance every time you leave the country (I don't know if it is enforced however).

But with that said, if you need an ACR card, a retirement visa could possibly be the way to go. With an ACR card, you have the same standing in the country as a citizen, except you cannot own real estate or own certain types of businesses 100%. It is also required in getting things like post paid cell phone/electricity/land lines, a peso bank account, or loans.

Hesekiels
11-02-08, 13:02
I disagree with those who recommend the tourist visa. The standards needed to obtain a retirement visa have been lowered recently, and I think it only requires a $10,000 "investment," which means you can put this amount in a local bank, draw interest, and get the visa. It's reasonably simple to obtain. If you keep extending a tourist visa for months on end there's a possibility of problems arising with Immigration, and you do not want that hassle.

GE

GoodEnough:

with all due respect, but my experience in terms of dealing with local authorities was rather discouraging.

When I had applied for my permanent residence card I was told by a high levelled immigration officer that it is "no problem at all, just a formality". But all of sudden dozens of problems appeared including more and more additional requirements to meet. Needless to say that nobody had informed me properly in advance, plus - very upsetting - during the entire process I got different information from different officers. To cut a long story short, it cost me a lot of time and money including the usual bribes (sorry, they have called it 'coffee-money').

Don't get me wrong, I would be most pleased if things have changed nowadays and obtaining a retirement visa is 'really no problem'! However, I am still sceptical, especially when 'the new standards have been lowered' (question: do really all the immigration officers know that and act accordingly?)!

Good luck to all applicants!

Cheers!


Hesekiels

GoodEnough
11-03-08, 10:13
Hesekiels, you've been through it and I never have, so I bow to your experience. I was just repeated what I've read and what I've been told by friends here who have gone through it. One lesson may be to just hire a good "fixer" and let him weave through the bureaucracy on your behalf. I never mess with the government functionaries on my own and would prefer to pay others small amounts to do it for me.

My worry about perennially extending tourist visas is that sooner or later it's apt to backfire and those who do so make themselves prey to all kinds of other problems.

GE

Fastpiston
11-07-08, 07:29
I went through this analysis with a friend a few months back. We got all the requirements from immigration and compared both. It was quite clear that a tourist visa was the way to go. You need to renew the tourist visa every two months, but any agency can do it for about a 500 peso tourist charge. You can stay in the country for up to 18 months before having to leave the country for at least 24 hours. The retirement visa has a bunch of requirements that are a hassle, and it is expensive. There are also a couple of things you have to do every year. And importantly, you are required to notify them in advance every time you leave the country (I don't know if it is enforced however).

But with that said, if you need an ACR card, a retirement visa could possibly be the way to go. With an ACR card, you have the same standing in the country as a citizen, except you cannot own real estate or own certain types of businesses 100%. It is also required in getting things like post paid cell phone/electricity/land lines, a peso bank account, or loans.

You don't have to have a resident card to open a Peso account. Just bring two IDs.

GoodEnough
11-07-08, 11:48
I'm starting to think the the regulations all depend on the person to whom you speak at Immigration and how he/she interprets them. I went through the hassle of getting an ACR, only to be told by DOI in Manila that I needn't have bothered, since with the type of visa I have I do not need one to live here. Two Immigration offices: one in Davao, one in Manila, and two different stories from the same agency. Only here.

GE

Amavida
11-07-08, 16:24
You don't have to have a resident card to open a Peso account. Just bring two IDs.Sadly, not true anymore. All banks are required to ask for an ACR-i card before opening a bank a/c for an alien. You still need two other ID's.
Trust me I just came from my bank. Some banks enforce the regulation rigidly e.g. BDO, some banks are more flexible e.g Chinabank will let you open an a/c with two ID's if you write a letter promising to produce a ACR-i card within a generous a time frame (6 - 8 weeks).
AV

Amavida
11-07-08, 16:26
I'm starting to think the the regulations all depend on the person to whom you speak at Immigration and how he/she interprets them. I went through the hassle of getting an ACR, only to be told by DOI in Manila that I needn't have bothered, since with the type of visa I have I do not need one to live here. Two Immigration offices: one in Davao, one in Manila, and two different stories from the same agency. Only here.

GEI agree GE. I ALWAYS go to manila to do business with government departments. Its the only way to be sure.
AV

Punter 127
11-07-08, 16:48
I went through this analysis with a friend a few months back. We got all the requirements from immigration and compared both. It was quite clear that a tourist visa was the way to go. You need to renew the tourist visa every two months, but any agency can do it for about a 500 peso tourist charge. You can stay in the country for up to 18 months before having to leave the country for at least 24 hours. The retirement visa has a bunch of requirements that are a hassle, and it is expensive. There are also a couple of things you have to do every year. And importantly, you are required to notify them in advance every time you leave the country (I don't know if it is enforced however). My research seems to be leading me to the same conclusion. I think the tourist visa is best for me considering I will only be in the RP 8-10 months a year and that probably won’t be a continues stay.

The one time I extended my tourist visa the cost was $3200 Pisos using a travel agency, but I think that is cheaper than the retirement visa fees.

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=118&Itemid=43

Here’s a couple of links I found, if anybodies interested in the retirement visa.

http://www.pra.gov.ph/main/schedule_fees

http://www.pra.gov.ph/main/srrv_program2/5?page=1


If you keep extending a tourist visa for months on end there's a possibility of problems arising with Immigration, and you do not want that hassle.

GE I think GoodEnough suggest something here that should be considered.

Has anybody had any problems after extending a tourist visa for months on end?

Hesekiels
11-07-08, 22:04
My research seems to be leading me to the same conclusion. I think the tourist visa is best for me considering I will only be in the RP 8-10 months a year and that probably won稚 be a continues stay... Has anybody had any problems after extending a tourist visa for months on end?


Punter:

no doubt, a wise decision! And since any travel agency will do for you the needful a very comfortable solution as well! I know two guys who never encountered any problems to extend their visas over and over again. Simply give it a try!

Cheers!


Hesekiels

GoodEnough
11-08-08, 00:01
Sadly, not true anymore. All banks are required to ask for an ACR-i card before opening a bank a/c for an alien. You still need two other ID's.
Trust me I just came from my bank. Some banks enforce the regulation rigidly e.g. BDO, some banks are more flexible e.g Chinabank will let you open an a/c with two ID's if you write a letter promising to produce a ACR-i card within a generous a time frame (6 - 8 weeks).
AV
Like everything else in this place, the ease or difficulty of opening a simple bank account depends on "connections." When I opened mine, I never even went into the bank, but just asked someone in my office to get it done. I had the account in a couple of hours and an ATM card a few days later. If you guys have friends who have friends who are branch bank managers, there's no hassle at all.

GE

Amavida
11-08-08, 03:33
Like everything else in this place, the ease or difficulty of opening a simple bank account depends on "connections." When I opened mine, I never even went into the bank, but just asked someone in my office to get it done. I had the account in a couple of hours and an ATM card a few days later. If you guys have friends who have friends who are branch bank managers, there's no hassle at all.

GEToo true GE. When I first setup business here I paved the road with pesos. Never had to leave the office.. I had letters certifying huge bank account balances that were completely fictional.. etc
AV

Cunning Stunt
11-16-08, 12:41
Like everything else in this place, the ease or difficulty of opening a simple bank account depends on "connections." When I opened mine, I never even went into the bank, but just asked someone in my office to get it done. I had the account in a couple of hours and an ATM card a few days later. If you guys have friends who have friends who are branch bank managers, there's no hassle at all.

GE

I actually had the branch bank manager come to my home, with all the paperwork, and opened an account there and then. I had done some business with her husband and 'open sesame', the door was opened.

As a further example (as if one were needed) of the crazy level of croneyism rampant in Philippine society, my son who is no academic high flyer, has been offered a place in the one of the very top Manila colleges, because he is a good friend of a close relative of the vice principal. Again the door sprung open whereas if he had applied through the normal procedures he would not have stood a chance (and would have needed to go through a mountain of paperwork).

The situation is ridiculous and a damning indictment of the state of Philippine society.

Darth Sushi
11-18-08, 02:14
11/18/2008 MANILA, Philippines友oreigners who employ at least 10 Filipinos can stay in the country indefinitely.

President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on Monday signed the new rules for foreigners in hopes of providing more jobs for Filipinos in anticipation of an economic slowdown next year.

With the new 都pecial visa for employment generation (SVEG), qualified nonimmigrant foreigners will be extended 杜ultiple entry privileges and conditional extended stay without need of prior departure from the Philippines, according to Executive Order No. 758.

This is the first time the visa has been issued.

The privilege will also cover a qualified foreigner痴 spouse and unmarried children様egitimate, illegitimate or adopted傭elow 18 years old.

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20081118-172827/New-visa-seen-to-boost-economy
I wonder if this includes owning a bar full of girls :D How about 10 bar fines in a row!

Warbucks
11-18-08, 03:46
I actually had the branch bank manager come to my home, with all the paperwork, and opened an account there and then. I had done some business with her husband and 'open sesame', the door was opened.

As a further example (as if one were needed) of the crazy level of croneyism rampant in Philippine society, my son who is no academic high flyer, has been offered a place in the one of the very top Manila colleges, because he is a good friend of a close relative of the vice principal. Again the door sprung open whereas if he had applied through the normal procedures he would not have stood a chance (and would have needed to go through a mountain of paperwork).

The situation is ridiculous and a damning indictment of the state of Philippine society.


GH I don稚 know why you guys are limiting this to the Philippines 堵reasing palms happens all over the world. I see guys all the time in my line work get promotions not because they are qualified but because they know someone and what I do for living is extremely dangerouscronyism is worldwide.

Manta Ray
11-18-08, 13:34
A quick visa question for anyone out there who might be able to steer me in the right direction.

I am an American university professor based in Japan. I will be staying in the Philippines for exactly one year, Sept 1, 2009 to Aug 31, 2010 as a visiting research scholar at the official written invitation of a major university in Manila. Does anyone know what visa I should be applying for and how to go about the process?

Many thanks in advance for whatever info you can share.

LoveAsianWhores
11-18-08, 18:29
You don't have to have a resident card to open a Peso account. Just bring two IDs. Correct. I should be more specific. You can open a peso account without an ACR card, but you will only be able to fund the account with peso obtained from foreign currancy. For example, if you go into the branch with USD, you can deposit it into your peso account at the going exchange rate. Or you can do it online with a USD/Peso transfer. You cannot however deposit pesos in cash or check directly into the account. That is the law, however, it is likely you will find banks, branches within banks, and even different employees within the same branch with their own requirements. Some will be even more strict than required, and some less. My advice is that you should always be friendly with staff and if you don't get what you want, just keep trying different branches or different banks. For some reason, the "I have it, and I will bring it in next week, but we can we open the account today" line works quite often. If they like you, they can often open the account with just the promise of a requirement that is never met.

Darth Sushi
11-20-08, 07:31
A quick visa question for anyone out there who might be able to steer me in the right direction.

I am an American university professor based in Japan. I will be staying in the Philippines for exactly one year, Sept 1, 2009 to Aug 31, 2010 as a visiting research scholar at the official written invitation of a major university in Manila. Does anyone know what visa I should be applying for and how to go about the process?

Many thanks in advance for whatever info you can share.
You can go to the Philippine consulate and buy a one year tourist visa for about $280 (that's what my neighbor paid last year) otherwise, you'll be making a trip to immigration every 2 months for extensions. As for having a research invitation, perhaps there are other options but my experience is limited to tourist or balikbayan visa. You might also want to contact church missionaries for quite a few of them come here for year long missions.

BillB
11-26-08, 01:33
I have a question that I did not see answer to in the forum, I am living here in the Philippines with my Filipino wife, I have a friend who is visiting us here from US on Dec. 8, 2008. I know he can stay 21 days without Visa, but he already bought ticket and it is for 30 day stay he did not get visa before hand.

My question is if he enters the Philippines with ticket for 30 day stay, and no visa can he get extension from Immigration at airport. He lives in Boston and the Philippine Consulate is in NYC he don稚 want to go there if he does not have to. With only 12 days to go before departure I advised him not to use the Mail option.

What I basically need to know, is it a big problem trying to enter the Philippines when your ticket is for longer stay than the 21 days allowed, or can you get an extension as you enter Philippines at immigration on arrival. I know he has the options of changing ticket for 21 day stay then getting extension and changing ticket back to 30 day, or just staying 21 days, but he wants to stay the 30 days and looking for best option. Any information or suggestions we be appreciated.

Buko Max
11-26-08, 08:11
I know he can stay 21 days without Visa, but he already bought ticket and it is for 30 day stay he did not get visa before hand.
Your question is rather confusing because you say your Beantown friend can stay for 30 days without a visa!? As far as I know, if you do not apply for a visa at a consulate beforehand, you initially get a 21 day visa.

Sure he can get a visa extension upon arrival! While waiting in the immigration line, check to see if there is a supervisor standing around. If not, tell them you want an extension when you get to a booth. They will take you to the office where you pay something like 2900 php and 20 minutes later you get your extension. The first extension is 45 days if i remember right.

LoveAsianWhores
11-26-08, 08:26
I have a question that I did not see answer to in the forum, I am living here in the Philippines with my Filipino wife, I have a friend who is visiting us here from US on Dec. 8, 2008. I know he can stay 21 days without Visa, but he already bought ticket and it is for 30 day stay he did not get visa before hand.

My question is if he enters the Philippines with ticket for 30 day stay, and no visa can he get extension from Immigration at airport. He lives in Boston and the Philippine Consulate is in NYC he don稚 want to go there if he does not have to. With only 12 days to go before departure I advised him not to use the Mail option.

What I basically need to know, is it a big problem trying to enter the Philippines when your ticket is for longer stay than the 21 days allowed, or can you get an extension as you enter Philippines at immigration on arrival. I know he has the options of changing ticket for 21 day stay then getting extension and changing ticket back to 30 day, or just staying 21 days, but he wants to stay the 30 days and looking for best option. Any information or suggestions we be appreciated.Technically, it could be a problem, however, I have never heard of it being an issue. I have certainly done it in the past without issue. In fact, I have never even had immigration check my return ticket. The airline will sometimes check to make sure you have a return ticket, but they are only checking that you have it, and they dont care about the date.

In short, just tell your friend not to worry. The liklihood of a problem is extreemly small.

Darth Sushi
11-26-08, 09:15
Upon arrival, the tourist visa is for 21 days. The next extension is for 39 days for a total of 60 days. After that, it's 60 days each time for an extension up to a year but I've heard it's now 18 months but I'm not sure. You don't really need to get the extension right away but go ahead a grab it if you can. I usually go to immigrations about a week before each expiration date when I get an extension.

The rules state that a tourist must have a return ticket before your visa expires but they usually never check so don't volunteer info unless asked. Just ask for an extension...don't try to explain your situation unless asked. If you stay longer than six months, you need to pay for a immigration clearance, which is another 500 pesos. All they do is check the computers if your name pops up with the police/NBI.

When I first arrived, my departure ticket was for 60 days later but I just doctor an eTicket printout for 20 days later, which they never asked for. Than after the 1st extension, I threw away my doctored ticket printout and my real eTicket was now ready for use.

Vibrations
01-01-09, 17:38
Hi bros,

I little problem here. My gf is 20 (dating about 2 years) and I plan to marry her. I am a Malaysian.

Does anyone knwo the requirements to get married to filipina? Or better married in Malaysia?

Totally confused now. On the procedure. Not even sure if this forum is the right one.

Cunning Stunt
01-02-09, 04:47
Hi bros,

I little problem here. My gf is 20dating about 2 years) and I plan to marry her. I am a malaysian. Does anyone knwo the requirements to get married to filipina? Or better married in Malaysia?

Totally confused now. On the procedure. Not evn sure if this forum is the right one.

I suspect there are not too many Malaysian contributors to the Philippine Forum, Vibe, so you are unlikely to receive much useful feedback.

It might sound obvious, but I think the first place to start is the Malaysian Embassy/Consulate. They will be able to help you with requirements etc.

The following link may be of some use
http://www.lawyerment.com.my/boards/article-Malaysia_Family_Estate_Planning_Law-444.htm

Hope it all works out for you. GH

KyCuriosity
01-02-09, 05:05
You're living in Malaysia and wanting to marry a filipina? Or are you in US wanting to marry a filipina and you are a malay? And just wanting to marry in Malaysia? I actually married a malaysian girl already. Didn't turn out so good. So if it's to bring a spouse to the US, I'm good for info, otherwise, I'm no good. Hope you find your info.

Vibrations
01-02-09, 06:15
I suspect there are not too many Malaysian contributors to the Philippine Forum, Vibe, so you are unlikely to receive much useful feedback.
............................

Hope it all works out for you. GHThanks. But the malaysian embassy in manila SU*KS! They employ filipinos who know next to nothing about Malaysia. Can't even speak proper english. So disappointing!

Too many official website offering to many different procedures! So thought someone with experience doing it would be of better help.

Mr Hawaii
01-02-09, 06:30
I have a question that I did not see answer to in the forum, I am living here in the Philippines with my Filipino wife, I have a friend who is visiting us here from US on Dec. 8, 2008. I know he can stay 21 days without Visa, but he already bought ticket and it is for 30 day stay he did not get visa before hand.

My question is if he enters the Philippines with ticket for 30 day stay, and no visa can he get extension from Immigration at airport. He lives in Boston and the Philippine Consulate is in NYC he don稚 want to go there if he does not have to. With only 12 days to go before departure I advised him not to use the Mail option.

What I basically need to know, is it a big problem trying to enter the Philippines when your ticket is for longer stay than the 21 days allowed, or can you get an extension as you enter Philippines at immigration on arrival. I know he has the options of changing ticket for 21 day stay then getting extension and changing ticket back to 30 day, or just staying 21 days, but he wants to stay the 30 days and looking for best option. Any information or suggestions we be appreciated.

Sounds like he will only be a few days over his 21 days. Last time I was over by a few days, they just waved it off. They (immigration) won't know till they look at your passport when you exit the country, then they count the days from the entry date that is stamped in your passport. There is supposed to be a fine for each day you stay past your 21 days (a few hundred pesos I think). So, they may charge him or just "forget about it".

Starchild2012
02-12-09, 11:44
Any Good Visa extention agents in Manila which has reasonable fees.

So far i came up with this

Swagman Travel at Flores St., Ermita, Manila.

But need to compare rates as it would be an on going extention for more than 12 months hehehe :)

Thanks.

Khun Larry
02-16-09, 08:16
Upon arrival, the tourist visa is for 21 days. The next extension is for 39 days for a total of 60 days. After that, it's 60 days each time for an extension up to a year but I've heard it's now 18 months but I'm not sure. You don't really need to get the extension right away but go ahead a grab it if you can. I usually go to immigrations about a week before each expiration date when I get an extension.


How much is that 39 day extension Darth .. thanks much

A friend said he was refused entrance to visa place in angeles due to wearing shorts. Can anyone confirm, was not planning to bring long pants. thanks all

EZ Feelin
02-16-09, 08:33
How much is that 39 day extension Darth .. thanks much

A friend said he was refused entrance to visa place in angeles due to wearing shorts. Can anyone confirm, was not planning to bring long pants. thanks all


That is correct, last trip I went one day to submit my passport and the form,
and the following day when I went to pick it up, I had shorts on, and the guard would not let me in. Said I had to be wearing trousers, I had a friend with me in trousers so he was able to pick up by passport.

Ezfeelin

Cunning Stunt
02-16-09, 09:52
A friend said he was refused entrance to visa place in angeles due to wearing shorts. Can anyone confirm, was not planning to bring long pants. thanks all

Sandos (vest) or flip flops (thongs) will also preclude entry to any government office (and many bars and restaurants too) although why anyone should be so disrespectful as to wear beachwear on these occasions is beyond me.

The 38 day extension is, I think, about 4 thousand pesos. How much is it through an agency?

Bob Bowie
02-16-09, 17:54
That is correct, last trip I went one day to submit my passport and the form,
and the following day when I went to pick it up, I had shorts on, and the guard would not let me in. Said I had to be wearing trousers, I had a friend with me in trousers so he was able to pick up by passport.

Ezfeelin
This summer in Davao I wore basic Levi's and a basic botton shirt. The other 2 white guys in the place had on shorts and did not look like it was a problem for them.
I would suggest just throwing on some pants for a couple hours, it should not be that big of a deal, the place was well air conditioned.

Blunderer
02-17-09, 18:03
This summer in Davao I wore basic Levi's and a basic botton shirt. The other 2 white guys in the place had on shorts and did not look like it was a problem for them.
I would suggest just throwing on some pants for a couple hours, it should not be that big of a deal, the place was well air conditioned.
The guy who writes "The Living in the Philippines" blog (non mongering, some of it is quite interesting) wrote about this. I concur with his sentiments.

http://www.liveinthephilippines.com/content/2008/01/my-visit-to-the-bureau-of-immigration/

Fastpiston
04-27-09, 06:21
With the Permanent Resident Visa, check very carefully the 'accredited' banks. The larger Philippine banks PNB, BPI, Equitable, Metro are all missing from the list, leaving only the small or very small banks. A number of banks and insurance companies have failed in the Philippines over last 6 months. Like everywhere else in the world these days, there will be more. Do your due diligence on the small banks before placing money with them - the Philippine government deposit insurance scheme will not cover all the PRA deposit.

White Whale
05-06-09, 05:34
Just to make sure... My next stay will be six weeks so I need the visa being extended. I am planning to fly from Bangkok to Clark. From this thread and googling my easiest option would be using a travel agency in AC after arrived, right?

I do not need to visit embassy in origin (the country I live do not have one) or Bangkok? I do not need to travel to Manila immigration office? I do not need to visit Angeles immigration office somewhere in Dao? I do not need to contact anyone in Clark airport immigration?

BTW, I will be having the fligths itinerary with me but do I also need the passport size photo and/or something else? The passport of course.

Buko Max
05-06-09, 22:43
From this thread and googling my easiest option would be using a travel agency in AC after arrived, right?
All you really need is cold hard cash! Don't know about immigration at Clark but I have extended right at the immigration counter in Manila upon entry! Before getting your passport stamped, ask to speak to a supervisor for an extension. Should be just under 3000 php for 59 days

If they cannot accommodate you for some reason, there are many agencies in AC that can do it for you such as Action Travel, Beeline Travel and Swagman!

White Whale
05-07-09, 15:21
All you really need is cold hard cash! Don't know about immigration at Clark but I have extended right at the immigration counter in Manila upon entry! Before getting your passport stamped, ask to speak to a supervisor for an extension. Should be just under 3000 php for 59 days

If they cannot accommodate you for some reason, there are many agencies in AC that can do it for you such as Action Travel, Beeline Travel and Swagman!

My problem with that is that I do not have enough Pesos left from my previous trip. It may be that in Clark there is no ATM or currency exchange before immigration.

Gravel Kicker
05-09-09, 06:23
My problem with that is that I do not have enough Pesos left from my previous trip. It may be that in Clark there is no ATM or currency exchange before immigration.Easy fix, All you need to do is Buy pesos while you are still in the U.S. and How might you do this? Very simple, go to Bank of America online. They will sell you pesos. The rate sucks but, IMHO worth it! They charge your account or credit card and send you peso paper currency in the mail. I'm planning to use this service on my next trip. I would only change 100USD and change the rest of your cash in AC. Other banks might provide this service, never looked into it.

Matius
05-10-09, 00:43
With the Permanent Resident Visa, check very carefully the 'accredited' banks. The larger Philippine banks PNB, BPI, Equitable, Metro are all missing from the list, leaving only the small or very small banks. A number of banks and insurance companies have failed in the Philippines over last 6 months. Like everywhere else in the world these days, there will be more. Do your due diligence on the small banks before placing money with them - the Philippine government deposit insurance scheme will not cover all the PRA deposit.Bdo is the second largest bank, by assets, in PH, public traded. Its on the list. Its also right down the street from the PRA office in Makati. I would not put anything in it, but what is requried for the PRA, as their service is poor. But they are big and have wide spread throughout PH. Don't dispute what you are saying, don't know, but hope this helps.

White Whale
05-10-09, 06:28
Easy fix, All you need to do is Buy pesos while you are still in the U.S. and How might you do this? Very simple, go to Bank of America online. They will sell you pesos. The rate sucks but, IMHO worth it! They charge your account or credit card and send you peso paper currency in the mail. I'm planning to use this service on my next trip. I would only change 100USD and change the rest of your cash in AC. Other banks might provide this service, never looked into it.

I am living in Northern Europe. Probably I could exchange Pesos while still in Bangkok?

Amavida
05-10-09, 14:35
My problem with that is that I do not have enough Pesos left from my previous trip. It may be that in Clark there is no ATM or currency exchange before immigration.just get some pesos at the airport in arrival. It will be a better exchange rate than outside the PI.
AV

White Whale
05-10-09, 17:06
just get some pesos at the airport in arrival. It will be a better exchange rate than outside the PI.
AV

Original problem was getting my Visa extended to allow six weeks stay. It was proposed to do upon arrival at Clark immigration. So I would need ~3k before immigration desk at Clark.

Manfest
05-13-09, 03:25
Perhaps this is not possible, but is there a way for a non-Filipino to obtain actual Philippines citizenship?

I was hoping not to marry, am not formerly a citizen, do not have any native blood, was not born here. It would seem the only way to buy land and have full ownership of businesses. Anyway, any facts on this matter, or lead on where to look or ask questions might be helpful. Thanks.

Cunning Stunt
05-13-09, 04:31
Perhaps this is not possible, but is there a way for a non-Filipino to obtain actual Philippines citizenship?

I was hoping not to marry, am not formerly a citizen, do not have any native blood, was not born here. It would seem the only way to buy land and have full ownership of businesses. Anyway, any facts on this matter, or lead on where to look or ask questions might be helpful. Thanks.

Anything is possible here in the Philippines if you have enough money and the right connections (to pay that money to). But, I imagine, you would have to have lived in the country for a minimum of 3-5 years on a long term visa and have invested substantial sums of money into the place.

Best to cultivate the friendship of a immigration official (higher the better and remember that friendship is a purchasable commodity here:D) and pick their brains/enlist their help.

But I would say that the pitfalls and the restrictions placed on you as a Philippine citizen would make it not worth the effort (although I believe that now you can hold dual nationality as an American/Filipino but not sure about other countries).

FreebieFan
05-13-09, 05:49
Anything is possible here in the Philippines if you have enough money and the right connections (to pay that money to). But, I imagine, you would have to have lived in the country for a minimum of 3-5 years on a long term visa and have invested substantial sums of money into the place.

Best to cultivate the friendship of a immigration official (higher the better and remember that friendship is a purchasable commodity here:D) and pick their brains/enlist their help.

But I would say that the pitfalls and the restrictions placed on you as a Philippine citizen would make it not worth the effort (although I believe that now you can hold dual nationality as an American/Filipino but not sure about other countries).Or you need to be called Freddie Roach. In todays Inquirer they want to confer an honorary Filipino citizenship on him for being Manny's coach.

Finrod
05-13-09, 16:59
Anything is possible here in the Philippines if you have enough money and the right connections (to pay that money to). But, I imagine, you would have to have lived in the country for a minimum of 3-5 years on a long term visa and have invested substantial sums of money into the place.

Best to cultivate the friendship of a immigration official (higher the better and remember that friendship is a purchasable commodity here:D) and pick their brains/enlist their help.

But I would say that the pitfalls and the restrictions placed on you as a Philippine citizen would make it not worth the effort (although I believe that now you can hold dual nationality as an American/Filipino but not sure about other countries).
With enough money, I suppose anything might be possible. For those of us without such deep pockets, it is still possible to obtain citizenship. However, it requires a minimum of 10 years of residency. But ... a very big but ... you are still not eligible to buy land, that is reserved for the native-born only. The only thing citizenship gets you over a permanent residency visa (like 13a or SRRV or investors) is the privilege of voting. So it is really not worth the hassle.

Britisher
05-13-09, 17:39
With enough money, I suppose anything might be possible. For those of us without such deep pockets, it is still possible to obtain citizenship. However, it requires a minimum of 10 years of residency. But. A very big but. You are still not eligible to buy land, that is reserved for the native-born only. The only thing citizenship gets you over a permanent residency visa (like 13a or SRRV or investors) is the privilege of voting. So it is really not worth the hassle.SRRV (investor visa) allows you citizenship in 10 years or in 5 years, if you are a teacher.

Investment required: 50 K usd, can be used to buy a aprtment.

Hope this helps.

Manfest
05-13-09, 23:29
Anything is possible here in the Philippines if you have enough money and the right connections (to pay that money to). --cut--

Best to cultivate the friendship of a immigration official (higher the better and remember that friendship is a purchasable commodity here:D) and pick their brains/enlist their help.

--cut--(although I believe that now you can hold dual nationality as an American/Filipino but not sure about other countries).

This is definitely the direction I was hoping for. Invest a sum early and pay to grease the wheels to expedite the process. The devil will be in the details of finding said person who can actually help. I can visit for long periods of time, but also want to maintain dual citizenships. Thanks for the suggestions.

Has anyone actually obtained citizenship, or maintained a dual citizenship?

FreebieFan
05-15-09, 01:05
This is definitely the direction I was hoping for. Invest a sum early and pay to grease the wheels to expedite the process. The devil will be in the details of finding said person who can actually help. I can visit for long periods of time, but also want to maintain dual citizenships. Thanks for the suggestions.

Has anyone actually obtained citizenship, or maintained a dual citizenship? Just remember that everyone will "claim" to be able to help.

This is normal in third world countries when people can sense an opportunity to score some extra cheese.

The reality and frustration comes when "your guy" reveals that he really can't help at all.

Pay on results delivered would be a good plan here.

Fastpiston
05-18-09, 10:14
Bdo is the second largest bank, by assets, in PH, public traded. Its on the list. Its also right down the street from the PRA office in Makati. I would not put anything in it, but what is requried for the PRA, as their service is poor. But they are big and have wide spread throughout PH. Don't dispute what you are saying, don't know, but hope this helps.

You are right. BDO has megred with Equitable and PCI banks, hence its size. Thank you for the correction!

GoodEnough
05-18-09, 12:51
Just remember that everyone will "claim" to be able to help.

This is normal in third world countries when people can sense an opportunity to score some extra cheese.

The reality and frustration comes when "your guy" reveals that he really can't help at all.

Pay on results delivered would be a good plan here.
I think you're being extremely naive about the circumstances you're going to confront in trying to bring this off, and you're likely to get taken for thousands of dollars without realizing the results you hope to obtain. Leaving aside the question of why any sane person would actually seek Filipino citizenship, which offers you almost nothing, the fact is that if you follow an illegal route in obtaining it, you're liable to, at best,encounter serious hassles and at worse some jail time if the fraud you have perpetuated is ever discovered, which it will be if you ever get on the wrong side of someone with serious political weight.

This is, in general, a bad idea with very little in the way of upside potential for you.

GE

ShadowAxis
05-19-09, 17:25
I would agree; you're going to get screwed. And there is simply no reason to do this. I have been here since 2005. And had an attorney in the Bureau of Immigration offer to do all the paperwork and shepherd the application through for p350000. 00. It was a totally legitimate offer as these things go. But if I'm going to pay for citizenship it should at least include universal health care, a passport you can actually travel on, and the ability to own real property.

Realize that this country is a playground for, and is "in service to" wealthy Filipinos. Foreigners who come here to fuck "the help, " are tolerated as long as they don't rock the boat (journalists), start funding political opposition, or cause some pampered local to lose face. Make no mistake, the only thing really welcome here is your cash.

You are much better off keeping your nose clean, your footprint small, your head down. Have a good time. Live here if you want; but always remember you are a guest and should be willing to walk away from whatever you have invested here.

Be mentally prepared to take the hit.

For example. I bought my place for about $100K (cash) back in 2005. The condo has almost doubled in value. But if I get fucked, or they revalue the currency, or I sell and for x or y reason can't get the money out. Well, it's about the same as if I had paid $2K a month for a luxury condo in the best section of town with an endless supply of young supple pussy. A lifestyle I could simply not afford in San Francisco, Tokyo or NYC.


I think you're being extremely naive about the circumstances you're going to confront in trying to bring this off, and you're likely to get taken for thousands of dollars without realizing the results you hope to obtain. Leaving aside the question of why any sane person would actually seek Filipino citizenship, which offers you almost nothing, the fact is that if you follow an illegal route in obtaining it, you're liable to, at best, encounter serious hassles and at worse some jail time if the fraud you have perpetuated is ever discovered, which it will be if you ever get on the wrong side of someone with serious political weight.

This is, in general, a bad idea with very little in the way of upside potential for you.

GE

Amavida
08-15-09, 06:41
this is definitely the direction i was hoping for. invest a sum early and pay to grease the wheels to expedite the process. the devil will be in the details of finding said person who can actually help. i can visit for long periods of time, but also want to maintain dual citizenships. thanks for the suggestions.

has anyone actually obtained citizenship, or maintained a dual citizenship?if you are balikbayan then permanent residency is easy & useful at times if you are living here long term.

full citizenship is unnecessary & undesirable. read up. e.g. 'poriners' pay
for an air ticket. locals pay air ticket + an extra tax for being a citizen. 'poriners' can come & go at will, locals have to submit to all the government crap to escape the country. why would you want to do this?

forget about ever having the ability to own tracts of land etc. this place is one big tribal collection of nepotism. your money is welcomed but you will never be one of 'them' & dont ever forget it.

i know one very wealthy round eye guy down in mindanao who got himself elected to a political seat. i asked local people why did you vote for him? they all laughed & said with a big silly smile 'because he's rich'. this is ok if you like to sleep with a security detail surrounding your house & travel everywhere in bullet proof motorcades at high speed.

av

Dreamplay 767
08-27-09, 13:27
This question is for the (semi) residents in Manila.

One of the things I like to do when I go to the Philippines is to visit a dentist for scaling and cleaning.

I've done it in Baguio for 700 PHP and received a very similar treatment in Makati for 2000 PHP, which I thought was a rip-off.

Can anyone recommend a reasonably-priced dentist in Metro Manila?

To keep up with the spirit of this site, a good looking female dentist would definitely be a plus.

Thanks a bunch.

Buko Max
08-28-09, 02:16
Should have posted this in the general thread.
Don't really hang in Manila much but the going
rate for teeth cleaning should be around 400 php.

Chocha Monger
08-29-09, 21:35
I know this question is not directly related to this thread but was hoping someone may have the answer to this.

I've been in communication with a filipina who I hooked up with a year ago. She has since married a British citizen but things don't seem to be working out. She presently has her green card and is interested in coming to visit me in the U.S.

I'm interested in flying her into town here for a week of fun. My question is can a filipina with a u.k green card and a philippine passport travel to the U.S. easily?
If she can show enough money to support herself for 90 days in the US and a return ticket she should be able to get a US tourist visa easier than a Filipina without those things. Her status as a married woman should help too but it's still a crap shoot depending on how her interview goes. Can she give a good reason for visiting the US besides getting rooted?

White Whale
09-02-09, 05:52
All you really need is cold hard cash! Don't know about immigration at Clark but I have extended right at the immigration counter in Manila upon entry! Before getting your passport stamped, ask to speak to a supervisor for an extension. Should be just under 3000 php for 59 days

If they cannot accommodate you for some reason, there are many agencies in AC that can do it for you such as Action Travel, Beeline Travel and Swagman!

Been back home over one month... SIGH :(

I stumbled into receipts doing final unpacking. I used travel agency service in Pasific Breeze hotel lobby for them to do it. I was staying in Central Park hotel at the time. Gave them my passport and had it back delivered to my hotel front desk same day. It was charged in my hotel bill. Extremely convienent.

Then about the cost. Total cost 3700PHP:
Visa waiver application fee 1000
Visa waiver 500
Certificate fee 500
Legal research fee 30
Express lane fee 500
Express lane fee (certification) 500

Travel agent 670 (Not in receipt)

So doing this myself I would have saved 670 or 1670 depending how long I would wanted to spent time in immigration office.

I am traveling back xmas time and do same thing in Subic Bay. I will be in Phils 23 days :) I believe the local travel agent will find the immigration office in Olongapo City.

X Man
09-02-09, 13:50
Why don't you suggest that she purchase some cialis or V for her man, rather than going to great lenghts to piddle around in someone else's puddle?

X


Unfortunately, she will not be able to show enough money for 90 days. I was hoping since she's already in the U.K. with a green card it would be a lot easier than if she still lived in Phils. The reason she planned on giving for travelling to the U.S. was visiting an auntie living in the same state as me. Oh well, I was hoping to show her a good time for a week. She's not happy with the old limey who appears not to be able to get it up which surprises me since she's a real stunner.

Slipperydee
09-03-09, 04:07
A good way to give/spend less will be by marrying a Pinay in the Philippines(legal/not) and apply for IMM13.

I have 'someone' offering me to do it for $1,400.00. Less hassle and yet you will keep your nationality with lesser investment required.

Nvslim
09-03-09, 10:14
Because she would rather be with a real man instead of some old geezer who dresses himself in plaid bell bottoms.



You add nothing to the discussion. Next time you feel the need to make some smart ass remark, DON'T.

Slim

Nvslim
09-04-09, 19:38
I can understand your sensitivity. I was not aware that you married your filipina wife in Vegas with a person looking like Elvis doing the vows:
http://www.internationalsexguide.info/forum/showpost.php?p=906681&postcount=2046

It must have been quite frustrating waking up the next morning after the booze wore off.



No, it wasn't. She is loving, kind, smart, hard working, cute, pretty, and still makes me horny after 20 years. You should be so lucky to find a woman half as good.

Amavida
09-05-09, 02:04
She's not happy with the old limey who appears not to be able to get it up which surprises me since she's a real stunner.This is an interesting point. Even the most shy inexperienced virgin bride from the PI will, in my experience, blossom into a woman with 'needs' after a period of time in a marriage with a foreigner in a new country. They learn to enjoy sex & start to look for more than a quick half limp poke now & then.
Many girls stay celibate until hooking up with a foreigner because they have seen so many of their cousins/sisters/mothers screwed & left for dead with a rug slug on board by pinoy guys. They are the sensible ones.
Something to remember when calculating what age gap is appropriate for your intended spouse..

AV

Nvslim
09-05-09, 07:31
Yeah, you are probably right. Please post some wedding pics. Thanks.



Get your own jack off material.

Irony Monger
09-23-09, 03:29
From what I have read in this forum, I understand that foreign persons cannot own property in the Philippines. However, what about foreign corporations? In other words, if I form a corporation (basically a shell), could the company buy a house for the use of company execs (aka me) on "business travel"?

Warbucks
09-23-09, 08:53
From what I have read in this forum, I understand that foreign persons cannot own property in the Philippines. However, what about foreign corporations? In other words, if I form a corporation (basically a shell), could the company buy a house for the use of company execs (aka me) on "business travel"?


http://www.makaticondo.net/Buying_Guide/page_2002143.html

This info can be found all over the internet. If you form a company a Filipino or Filipinos would still have to own 60 percent. Filipinos have the laws in place where a foreigner cannot succeed here at all financially. (maintenance fees on any eligible property a foreigner can own etc). Do not come here and try to make money (that you need to live on) in most aspects you will fail.

Keep it simple live off some form of a pension rather it be work/interest/stocks/ put a couple of taxis on the street and that should be it. One guy I know who lives in my subdivision he owns about 5 taxis they bring him in about $1700 a month take away some of that for maintenance. On top of that He is retired and collecting a pension. This is the only way to live out here.

Chocha Monger
09-23-09, 10:48
I could not agree more completly with this post. In fact, a few of the filipinas I've met and bedded down with were already "off the market" and waiting for their fiancee visa's to arrive so they can fly off to the promised land to live in misery with the old coot in the USA or Europe. These filipinas have a very high sexual appetite. I can only assume my frank comments angered a certain poster who's been married to a much younger filipina for over 20 years but then brags about mongering in AC. If he thinks she's just staying home and not meeting her own needs, he's kidding himself.
A quick half limp poke certainly will not satisfy these women. Filipinas are notorious for having a wandering eye and they quickly size up the prospects of a bigger dick or bigger wallet once they get to their new country. As for those mongers who get married to these demure little creatures then take off to their old tricks again, they can rest assured that the little lady is giving a 3-hole performance while answering their phone calls. They're even better at this than the Thai girls. As I'm sure that many guys on here will attest these girls can hold a phone conversation with a cock chock a block up their opposite end without making the guy miss a stroke! There are young studs with plenty of wood just waiting for some married monger to leave his young import alone for a moment. Some of the smooth ones will wait until you leave her at the restaurant table and they'll have her number quicker than you can drain your prostate. I hope no one here is naive enough to believe that the little lady has her pussy up on blocks anxiously awaiting their return.

Chocha Monger
09-23-09, 11:28
http://www.makaticondo.net/Buying_Guide/page_2002143.html

This info can be found all over the internet. If you form a company a Filipino or Filipinos would still have to own 60 percent. Filipinos have the laws in place where a foreigner cannot succeed here at all financially. (maintenance fees on any eligible property a foreigner can own etc). Do not come here and try to make money (that you need to live on) in most aspects you will fail.

Keep it simple live off some form of a pension rather it be work/interest/stocks/ put a couple of taxis on the street and that should be it. One guy I know who lives in my subdivision he owns about 5 taxis they bring him in about $1700 a month take away some of that for maintenance. On top of that He is retired and collecting a pension. This is the only way to live out here.
The only thing that seems to make any money in the Philippines are the expat bars. You might want to open a bar and pimp some hoes. With high bar fines and pricey ladies drinks you should make enough to get by comfortably if you don't get murdered.

TurdyCurdyOne
09-26-09, 01:40
I was under the impression a foreigner cannot engage in business there, unless it is biz that caters only to other foreigners, so how does your friend get into the taxi business then?


http://www.makaticondo.net/Buying_Guide/page_2002143.html

This info can be found all over the internet. If you form a company a Filipino or Filipinos would still have to own 60 percent. Filipinos have the laws in place where a foreigner cannot succeed here at all financially. (maintenance fees on any eligible property a foreigner can own etc). Do not come here and try to make money (that you need to live on) in most aspects you will fail.

Keep it simple live off some form of a pension rather it be work/interest/stocks/ put a couple of taxis on the street and that should be it. One guy I know who lives in my subdivision he owns about 5 taxis they bring him in about $1700 a month take away some of that for maintenance. On top of that He is retired and collecting a pension. This is the only way to live out here.

TurdyCurdyOne
09-26-09, 01:45
Why would anyone pay to marry a Filipina? Seems to me the benefit goes mostly to them as they can later apply for US visa/green card. No shortage of filipinas wanting to marry me there.


A good way to give/spend less will be by marrying a Pinay in the Philippines(legal/not) and apply for IMM13.

I have 'someone' offering me to do it for $1,400.00. Less hassle and yet you will keep your nationality with lesser investment required.

Mayntain
09-26-09, 14:09
My problem with that is that I do not have enough Pesos left from my previous trip. It may be that in Clark there is no ATM or currency exchange before immigration.
For some reason mongers like to leave the phils with just enough to pay a the exit fees. But I make sure I have about 5k to 10k pesos,because I know I will be returning one day soon and would not have the problem of trying to exchange cash at night.

FreebieFan
09-29-09, 05:49
I was under the impression a foreigner cannot engage in business there, unless it is biz that caters only to other foreigners, so how does your friend get into the taxi business then?I'm a director in a business that is 66% owned by Filipinos and 33% by me and other foreigners. Our entire busuness is selling to Filipinos.

TurdyCurdyOne
09-29-09, 21:45
I'm a director in a business that is 66% owned by Filipinos and 33% by me and other foreigners. Our entire busuness is selling to Filipinos.Sorry, I MEANT to say that a foreigner cannot own majority interest in any business there. In your situation seems near impossible to me to have a method of guaranteeing your investment and your part of the biz can be yanked out from under your feet on a whim. There are numerous examples of foreign corporations being taken over by Filipinos and this is upheld by their "court system" there. Last one I recall was a foreign owned big hotel that was confisgated by Filipinos and their "supereme" court upheld this action, stating essentially that foreigners cannot own businesses in the Philippines.

If you have found a way to guarantee your investment, even the principal, I'd like to hear it.

Spooks
09-30-09, 09:17
I'm a director in a business that is 66% owned by Filipinos and 33% by me and other foreigners. Our entire busuness is selling to Filipinos.There are few exceptions like mining where foreign ownership can be 100 %

I also have a corporation, only hold 5 % of the shares but have sole access to bank and other financial assets. Do not buy prefer to lease, so no real assets excpet the cash in the bank which only I have access to.

Should the corporation acquire real estate assets, then get the corporation to lease the asset to you sole name, which you can do. Leaseholds are near impossible to over turn, unlike ownership which does suffer.

FreebieFan
10-01-09, 08:31
Sorry, I MEANT to say that a foreigner cannot own majority interest in any business there. In your situation seems near impossible to me to have a method of guaranteeing your investment and your part of the biz can be yanked out from under your feet on a whim. There are numerous examples of foreign corporations being taken over by Filipinos and this is upheld by their "court system" there. Last one I recall was a foreign owned big hotel that was confisgated by Filipinos and their "supereme" court upheld this action, stating essentially that foreigners cannot own businesses in the Philippines.

If you have found a way to guarantee your investment, even the principal, I'd like to hear it.There are no guarantees with this, other than trust of the principles, and the knowledge that if they tried to pull this out from me, they have no way to run the business without the expertise and the overseas contacts that I bring, so their own investment would be worthless as would mine. Its been going a few years and works well.

Warbucks
10-01-09, 11:04
Sorry, I MEANT to say that a foreigner cannot own majority interest in any business there. In your situation seems near impossible to me to have a method of guaranteeing your investment and your part of the biz can be yanked out from under your feet on a whim. There are numerous examples of foreign corporations being taken over by Filipinos and this is upheld by their "court system" there. Last one I recall was a foreign owned big hotel that was confisgated by Filipinos and their "supereme" court upheld this action, stating essentially that foreigners cannot own businesses in the Philippines.

If you have found a way to guarantee your investment, even the principal, I'd like to hear it.

If you open a business in the Philippines, if you go into a business with a Filipino or if you have to put anything in their name be prepared to lose it. It痴 that simple.

In my experience shame... when it comes to money is not applicable here.

After all I have seen. Besides a fuck pad I really wouldn稚 want to invest in this country.

Irony Monger
10-01-09, 12:45
If you open a business in the Philippines, if you go into a business with a Filipino or if you have to put anything in their name be prepared to lose it. It痴 that simple.So when Hyatt corporation sets up a new hotel anywhere in the Philippines, the majority owner is not the corp, but a Filipino? Why would any company do that unless they had that front man by the cajones?

GoodEnough
10-01-09, 23:50
It's true that for most people, making any investment here, whether in real estate, a business, or whatever, is risky. There is no real justice system and foreigners have little or no contractual/legal protection. The German company, Freiport, which invested tens of millions of dollars in building the newest terminal at the Manila airport found this out the hard way when, just as the terminal was completed, the supreme court decided that the contract was illegal and that the government and not Freiport owned the terminal. The case was well publicized and further diminished the already skimpy foreign investments here.

As to the large hotel chains, most do not own the hotels that bear their names. They manage the hotels under management contracts, for local corporations that actually own the real estate. This is true not only in the Philippines but all over the world.

Having said all that, I know a few guys who have invested here and who have done extremely well. Virtually all of them however, have taken the time to establish the very powerful contacts they need and they stay on top of everything every day. So, while it's not impossible to make money from a business investment here, it's not easy and it's not typical. Unless you're willing to invest the time and unless you know the country very well, it's far better to look for other, easier pastures.

GE

LoveAsianWhores
10-03-09, 05:48
There are few exceptions like mining where foreign ownership can be 100 %That is not correct. A foreigner can own 100% of any local business, as long as it is not retail (which includes bars, restaurents, etc as they sell to local consumers) or a couple of other niche businesses. Any type of internet, manufacturing, wholesaling, import/export, etc can be owned 100%, except of course the land.

Jambo
10-03-09, 20:35
You guys that are operating small businesses (from) the PI, and employing people in the PI, what kind of visas are you using?


A foreign investor with an investment of at least US$250,000 may be granted a Subic Special Investor Visa. Temporary work permits and Subic Special Work Visas could also be granted to foreign nationals subject to certain requirements

I don't think I can put together 250K in investment to meet the straight up requirement!

But I might be able to provide justification for the Subic Special Work Visa (I can show I have a skill not available locally). (And not just that my schlong is 3" longer than a pinoys)

That's one purpose of the HK Incorporation guys talk about, isn't it? The HK entity wants to set up in the Subic zone, or perhaps other special tax zones. And the HK entity wants to employ me as CEO (and hire some locals of course).

Is this a typical set-up?

Punter 127
11-03-09, 05:03
I extended my 21 day visa to 59 days (first extension) by taking my passport to a travel agent in Cebu (ATJ travels & tours) I dropped my passport off one day and picked it up the next afternoon, the total cost was P3202.00 they gave me the following break down of cost along with receipts.

Application fee 1000.00
Visa waiver fee 500.00
Legal research 30.00
Bi clearance 500.00
Express lane 500.00

Sub total 2530.00

ATJ fee 600.00
Vat 72.00

Total P3202. 00


IMHO P672.00 to have the agency handle this is money well spent.
I recently repeated the above process at the same agency in Cebu and there has been a 500P price increase. The increase appears to be in the “express lane” charge. Total cost now was 3702P. (Another agency quoted me 4200P.)

Zackary Kr
11-03-09, 08:22
I recently repeated the above process at the same agency in Cebu and there has been a 500P price increase. The increase appears to be in the 兎xpress lane charge. Total cost now was 3702P. (Another agency quoted me 4200P.)

In my case, I went directly to the Immigration office that was located near Clark (Angeles) hoping to avoid the extra charge for both the "express lane" charge as well as the charge from the travel agency.

I asked the officer at both the desk and the door officer about the "express lane" charge to see if I could avoid paying it since I wouldn't mind the wait. They told me that regardless of anything, the "express lane" charge is a mandatory fee that all (i'm assuming he meant foreigners) must pay.

I was trying to extend my visa (for the first time) and I had a week left on my first entry. So, I had plenty of time and just was getting tired of all this extra money flowing out of my pocket.

The total cost for me was around 3,000 pesos and that's from having directly went there to do it myself. The travel agency that I got quoted a price from was 3,800 pesos which included their service fee.

An 800 pesos charge can be either considered reasonable or unreasonable depending on your circumstances/time/convenience.

Cheers,

zack

Mayntain
11-06-09, 02:48
Would someone explain in layman terms,how does owning taxis work as a business in the Phils?

Warbucks
11-06-09, 03:09
Would someone explain in layman terms,how does owning taxis work as a business in the Phils?

100K-200K PHP for the taxi. Another 70,000PHP to get it registered/license with the City Government. 5000PHP a year for (what we call in the States liability or what they call here in PI third party) insurance. 500PHP for village (subdivision)stickers if you live in a heavily guarded one like yours truly. If you live in a Condo just let driver keep car or find a place to park it where they sale parking space.

Driver pays you A bounty anywhere from 700-900PHP a day 5 times a week. Buys his own gas you pay for maintenance.... hell its your car.

The End

Cunning Stunt
11-06-09, 10:22
WB, what is stopping the driver from stealing your car?

Shitty sound system might put him off;).

Member #4214
11-06-09, 17:56
100K-200K PHP for the taxi. Another 70,000PHP to get it registered/license with the City Government. 5000PHP a year for (what we call in the States liability or what they call here in PI third party) insurance. 500PHP for village (subdivision)stickers if you live in a heavily guarded one like yours truly. If you live in a Condo just let driver keep car or find a place to park it where they sale parking space.

Driver pays you A bounty anywhere from 700-900PHP a day 5 times a week. Buys his own gas you pay for maintenance.... hell its your car.

The End

Your numbers make it appear extremely lucrative. You haven't painted the whole picture. No way owning taxis in Manila could be that profitable for any length of time. Have you owned a taxi there? If not, I'll simply say the numbers you provide don't tell the whole story. If you have, I'd be interested in seeing a real-life example of your first year cashflows on one cab. PM is fine if you prefer. Much thanks.

Aussiec
11-07-09, 03:56
In theary you make it sound like great profit and good return. Here are some realities. There are many many Taxi abandoned around city by drivers that just want to make money or lack of money and say the hell with it and your stuck looking for a car that could be anywhere and possible that it is not in one piece. How many filipinos do you know that you would surely intrust to take care of your property? The odds of the car making it a full year is not likely. When is the last time you seen a taxi that did not have atleast a ding or 2. If you want to make money in Philipines as foreigner then you will surely flush your money down the toilet. Money can be made but money here made is catering to the upper class and Chinese and Koreans.

Cunning Stunt
11-07-09, 07:12
I actually own a FX taxi franchise in the provinces (North Luzon). I didn稚 expect to see much profit and I have not been disappointed. It was more a means of employing Pinoy male relatives (i.e get them off my back;)). As has been pointed out here many times, Filipino/a痴 live their lives strictly by the tenets of 僧anyana. They can only see the here and now and planning for the future is an alien concept. Similarly they are not over careful on looking after the collateral even though it puts the bread in their mouths. So the vehicles are always breaking down and in need of parts/repairs. One of my vehicles was also involved in a fatal accident (drivers fault) but guess who paid off the deceased relatives?

Don稚 know about Manila, but the having chatted with many taxi drivers, it hardly appears a lucrative business for them and I cannot imagine it is a money spinner for the owners either. They rent their vehicle by the 24 hour period (and drive for most of it H&S is not a big issue in the P.I) and work every other day. The rental varies but is usually about 1000-1200 pesos per 24 hour period. If a franchise owner has 10 vehicles that means that he/she would be taking in 10000/12000 pesos a day or about $210-230. Out of this he would have to pay all the associated costs of business less gas which is the drivers responsibility. And there is the cost of the vehicles which, constantly driven, degrade quickly in Manila especially the way they are driven by irresponsible drivers.

Do the sums. It is not a business that I would recommend for those who like to sleep at night.

My best investment in the Philippines is a rice mill, which, although it doesn稚 make a lot, is a steady little earner.

I think that, at the moment, the best investment for a foreigner, in Manila, is in real estate. A 2 bed condo in a reasonably located, new condo development will cost P2-3 million and can bring in, on rental, about 8-10% income. The only problem is that the market is becoming inundated with new developments so there may well be a over surplus of units, a couple of years down the line.

Lets face it, for most, doing business in the Philippines is going to make a little fortune (provided you start with a big fortune):D.

Ben2
11-07-09, 09:03
If it were that "easy" to make money in the P.I....every Tom, Dick and Harry in the world would be here! Even if it was easy to make a decent living, the same applies....it is difficult for the locals....let alone the outsiders!

FreebieFan
11-07-09, 10:02
If it were that "easy" to make money in the P. I. Every Tom, Dick and Harry in the world would be here! Even if it was easy to make a decent living, the same applies. It is difficult for the locals. Let alone the outsiders!Moneylending.

Banks can charge upwards of 2-3% per month for business loans. So if you know decent honest working people who you know will pay and return, by offereing 1-1.5 per month you do way better than you can do in the normal banking system and actuaally help business's lower costs.

.12-18% return for doing nothing other than making sure they pay me back once per month is a good business. But there are lots of if's of course. Especially the "will they pay me back! "

Member #4214
11-07-09, 10:02
I actually own a FX taxi franchise in the provinces (North Luzon). I didn稚 expect to see much profit and I have not been disappointed ...

Thanks for that ... now I see Warbucks was only posting a hypothetical with unrealistic numbers.

Tell us about the rice mill: WTF is a rice mill? Could you post a picture to give us an idea? Roughly speaking what is your capital outflow/inflow, and the biggest threats/challenges?

One of my steady girls occasionally mentions setting up a sundries shop, but I'm not sure how much sense that really makes. Would be nice to find some small, simple business that keeps some idle hands busy and still pays for itself.

Thanks in advance.

Warbucks
11-07-09, 10:16
Thanks for that ... now I see Warbucks was only posting a hypothetical with unrealistic numbers.



I actually own a FX taxi franchise in the provinces (North Luzon).




Don稚 know about Manila,

What numbers did I tell you and the board that were hypothetical and unrealistic? The car, registration, the bounty?

I never said it was lucrative. I am sure owning a taxi in Manila and in the province is completely different in every aspect.

You think people in the province can afford a taxi on the regular? Hell people in Manila rarely take taxi but it is enough people in the capital with excess cash. My ex-personal driver has driven taxis in Manila for years and he doesn't look like he is starving. They must do alright.

Cunning Stunt
11-07-09, 11:47
My fault I should have spelled it out. An FX taxi is one of the 10 seater air-con vans that you see plying the streets of Manila and all provincial cities. In Manila they charge between 10-40 pesos depending how far your trip is. The amount is slightly less elsewhere. They can also be hired for sole use as an ordinary taxi, and are required, in Manila, to have a working meter (but don稚 rely on it). They are the main means of transport for those who cannot afford using normal taxis all of the time, but don稚 want to use jeepneys. They are very popular all over the Philippines.

A rice mill is the final stage in the rice preparation cycle where the dried rice is de-husked in a fucking great, noisy machine. I bought my rice mill (also in the provinces) several years ago at a knockdown price (guy needed the money fast) and it has paid for itself many times over. Thing seems to go forever and seldom needs repairs. Way it normally works is the farmer brings in his rice for milling and either pays cash if he has it or in a percentage of the milled rice if he hasn稚, which is then sold in the local market. It is busy the year round but in the harvesting season it can be going 16 hours a day and after all costs can make up to a couple of thousand pesos a day. Not a lot but better than a kick in the arse, as my old man used to tell me:D.


Millionaire Manny Pacquiao sure thought it was a bright idea.

Dear Manny is a stakeholder in the yellow airport taxi's which is a different ball game entirely.



One of my steady girls occasionally mentions setting up a sundries shop, but I'm not sure how much sense that really makes. Would be nice to find some small, simple business that keeps some idle hands busy and still pays for itself.


Also known as a sari-sari store they are found on almost every street in the Philippines. A good way to keep your girl busy but the profit margins are very small.

Warbucks
11-07-09, 12:17
Dear Manny is a stakeholder in the yellow airport taxi's which is a different ball game entirely.

I stand corrected.

I looked around and couldn't find shit on him being either. I think its just more Filipino folklore :)

Punter 127
11-09-09, 03:11
I obtained my second visa extension at the immigration office in Dumaguete, it was a simple process, and I was in and out in about 20 minutes. Total cost was 4800 Pesos for two months.

Fee break down,
http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=118&Itemid=43


BTW I did this while wearing a Henley style shirt, cargo shorts, and Italian leather sandals, nobody even acted like there was anything wrong with the way I was dressed. There were four other guys also getting extensions, and they were all wearing shorts.

Slowalk
11-13-09, 22:18
i was told that the laws have changed since i did my original injvestigation in 1999 - 2001. however, knowing what i know about the pi and knowing that the laws were so extremely riddled with loop holes to confirep001e your property, especially if your business becomes profitable, that even changed, the laws had too far to go for me to invest in the philippines. the pi is run by a very few families and it will always be that way.


general santos 1999-2001. i noticed that people would take an all day bus ride to davao just to get spaghetti at mcdonalds. i had the funding, a fail-proof business plan, the site, a builder, and was well along to getting a md's franchise in gensan. however, all of my attorneys in cebu told me that there was a history of the filipino families in that area confirep001ing successful businesses through the court system. the biggest trick is that although you can not hire workers directly and must hire through "the agency..."; successful owners would be charged with "discrimination", have their business confirep001ed, and be deportated.

angeles city 1997-1999. i was asked to "invest" in one of the bars in ac. i considered but, decided on more realistic conventional deal in hong kong. in the pi, the bars (any business) could only be owned in majority by a filipino citizen. you can only be a minority owner. these bars are seemingly always in trouble. if you think you are going to be partners with a long time owner, you are in for a humiliating lesson. one way some make money are from "investing partners..." that come along every year. they take your money, your new partner and the filipino majority owner moves to another bar or more commonly, simply changes its name, and the investor has a defunct bar. i recall a "hit" that occurred between an austrailian and canadian over one such business ordeal some years back. auto was ambushed in "the province."

Darth Sushi
11-16-09, 12:10
BTW I did this while wearing a Henley style shirt, cargo shorts, and Italian leather sandals, nobody even acted like there was anything wrong with the way I was dressed. There were four other guys also getting extensions, and they were all wearing shorts.Wouldn't work in AC. I saw a guy with a missing leg and they would not let him in the building. Luckily, he was with his GF and they let her process the extension for him. BTW, this applicable in any government building, not just immigration.

Starchild2012
11-17-09, 14:10
i was told that the laws have changed since i did my original injvestigation in 1999 - 2001. however, knowing what i know about the pi and knowing that the laws were so extremely riddled with loop holes to confirep001e your property, especially if your business becomes profitable, that even changed, the laws had too far to go for me to invest in the philippines. the pi is run by a very few families and it will always be that way.


general santos 1999-2001. i noticed that people would take an all day bus ride to davao just to get spaghetti at mcdonalds. i had the funding, a fail-proof business plan, the site, a builder, and was well along to getting a md's franchise in gensan. however, all of my attorneys in cebu told me that there was a history of the filipino families in that area confirep001ing successful businesses through the court system. the biggest trick is that although you can not hire workers directly and must hire through "the agency..."; successful owners would be charged with "discrimination", have their business confirep001ed, and be deportated.

angeles city 1997-1999. i was asked to "invest" in one of the bars in ac. i considered but, decided on more realistic conventional deal in hong kong. in the pi, the bars (any business) could only be owned in majority by a filipino citizen. you can only be a minority owner. these bars are seemingly always in trouble. if you think you are going to be partners with a long time owner, you are in for a humiliating lesson. one way some make money are from "investing partners..." that come along every year. they take your money, your new partner and the filipino majority owner moves to another bar or more commonly, simply changes its name, and the investor has a defunct bar. i recall a "hit" that occurred between an austrailian and canadian over one such business ordeal some years back. auto was ambushed in "the province."

well, times are changing, check out the new immigration rules, they are far better than any asian countries right now, you can open a business quite easy with employing 10 local folks.

if filipinos are so bad than how come chinese business families are successful ? either the families you talking off are chinese or philippines is not as bad as you think..i see indian doodle bags with no address doing 5-6 lending business what if they do the same in india..they will be kicked out in their own motherland and indians are thriving left and right in the philippines with questionable business practices.

korea and japan have higher trade barriers than the philippines, very few know here that auto ads of foreign car makes are only shown after mid night in korea and japan...they have higher import duties than philippines ..you can't start a small business as easily as in the ph as you can in japan, korea or china.

every country has protectionist measures, but if you now look at ph laws they are the best compare to any other asian or european or american countries at least in matters of doing small business or vacation...common tell me which country gives you 1 and half year tourist visa without leaving the country...agree it is for making money with extensions even then thailand does not do that.

you might also find it interesting that koreans are immigrating to the ph in thousands just check out the cebu tourism website. ph is a happening place, it will the place to be in coming years.

ShadowAxis
11-17-09, 15:54
These "can I start a business in the PI" discussions are about as senseless as the "I'm 70 and she's 18. But I think she really loves me! " threads. They come and go, and no amount of good advice makes a difference.

Even the small upper middle class here will tell you that without strong "big family connections" it's hard for locals with streets named after them to get much done, as a foreigner you're just another target.

Basically. There is no law in the Philippines. The lawyers here will tell you that. This county is an economic sinkhole. It ranks up there with Iran, Libya, Honduras and Yemen and it's nominal inflation rate is 9. 6%. I've been here for about 6 years now and I can tell you for a fact. The local ruling families are happy to sell us condos and let us fuck the help. But if you manage to create anything of real value, it'll get taken.

One noodle stand won't be a problem. 50 noodle stands will get you barred from re-entry while your competitor buys the business assets from a judge.

KongKing
11-17-09, 23:36
Well, Times are changing, check out the new immigration rules, they are far better than any Asian countries right now, you can open a business quite easy with employing 10 local folks.

Every country has protectionist measures, but if you now look at PH laws they are the best compare to any other Asian or European or american countries at least in matters of doing small business or vacation.

Ph is a happening place, it will the place to be in coming years.
I respect an individual's right to an opinion, but let's get some independent international objectivity in the discussion about comparing the Philippines with other countries.

The "Doing Business Project", backed by the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation, has in recent years rated some 180+ countries for the ease of doing business in/from those countries. Ten business indicators were assessed, including: starting a business, regulatory and tax environments, trading across borders, employing workers, getting credit, enforcing contracts and closing a business. Their most recent annual assessment is up to May 2009. See: www.doingbusiness.org/EconomyRankings/

The Philippines came 144th out of 183 countries. Thailand 12th, Japan 15th, Korea 19th, China 89th and Vietnam 93rd. The top 4 countries were assessed to be Singapore, New Zealand Hong Kong China then the USA.

And what about corruption?? Transparency International's Corruption Index for 2009 has just been released this week. Of the 180 countries independently assessed the Philippines came in at 139th. Asian countries included Hong Kong China 12th, Japan 17th, South Korea 39th, China 79th, Thailand 84th, and Vietnam 120th. The top 4 countries: New Zealand, Denmark, Singapore, Sweden. Not to forget United Kingdom 17th and USA 19th. Reference: www.transparency.org/

KongKing

Jambo
11-18-09, 01:13
Good advise there. If you must work the smart move seems to be figure out how to make money over the Internet, and leave all your income/savings outside the PI.

Two things give me pause about moving here and residency:
- Continued inflation in the PI while the dollar falls.
- PI is known for renegotiating the deal after the fact. I don't believe for a minute the promises of those PI residency visas. I would expect additional 'fees' to be imposed in the future.
- The best thing we can do is keep pointing to alternative retirement places in Asia, such as Thailand. Though Philippines seems to love milking the goose until it is dead, with little care for long term benefits.

Warbucks
11-18-09, 01:31
" discussions are about as senseless as the "I'm 70 and she's 18.
But I think she really loves me! " threads.

Be careful SA you walking on hollow ground there buddy. When I made such a statement I was flamed to a crisp even my occupation was thrown into the equation :)



" They come and go, and no amount of good advice makes a difference.

Even the small upper middle class here will tell you that without strong "big family connections" it's hard for locals with streets named after them to get much done, as a foreigner you're just another target.

Basically. There is no law in the Philippines. The lawyers here will tell you that. This county is an economic sinkhole. It ranks up there with Iran, Libya, Honduras and Yemen and it's nominal inflation rate is 9. 6%. I've been here for about 6 years now and I can tell you for a fact. The local ruling families are happy to sell us condos and let us fuck the help. But if you manage to create anything of real value, it'll get taken.

One noodle stand won't be a problem. 50 noodle stands will get you barred from re-entry while your competitor buys the business assets from a judge.


Excellent advice. What I have hard learned over the year and 1/2 and it is best to keep the investments outside the country.

GoodEnough
11-19-09, 10:41
Warbucks thank you for the nice words. The fact is that you and SA have presented the one single truism that everyone thinking of investing here should take to heart--though I know that my saying so will not make any difference. There will always be those convinced that they are the exception and that they have all bases covered.

Of all of the expats I know here who own businesses, a few do reasonably well, but their success is modest, enough to meet their needs, and they have no expectation of making huge sums. These guys are smart, and they're also realistic, and careful never to call any attention to themselves. They've also got rock solid marriages and operate, I'm sure, through their wives' names. I do know one guy who is extremely successful, but he's spent years establishing the networks of connections that he needs; years fighting various politicians who tried to remove him once he started to become successful, and years learning the system.

As to me, I would never invest a centavo in this country with any expectation of return. Everything that SA contends is completely true. There's no legal protection here for anyone, including most Filipinos, and certainly not for foreigners.

GE

Warbucks
01-05-10, 08:38
http://www.expatforum.com/articles/visas-permits-and-immigration/philippines-visas-permits-and-immigration.html

no I'm not talking about that. I'm asking if I need a Visa to stay in the Philippines if I'm married. You need a Visa if your staying more than 21 days. The old hag says pictures and marraige license will do. I don't want to go to see this old thing this weekend if I don't have too.When it comes to Real estate, visas, businesses and other bullshit that could cause you financial loss it痴 best to seek out legal counsel. Do not listen to friends and family of your significant other on issues such as these.

Starchild2012
01-11-10, 04:40
Special BI visas create 33,000 jobs


http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/237874/special-bi-visas-create-33000-jobs

Red Kilt
01-16-10, 13:40
Special BI visas create 33,000 jobs

http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/237874/special-bi-visas-create-33000-jobsThis special visa is only relevant for any foreigner with an interest in a company that employs at least 10 full-time and regular Filipino workers. It has quite a lot of red tape involved in it but it seems to be working. The BoI is really trying hard to make the visa process less complicated and it is getting better. It makes you wonder how bad it must have been 20 years ago.

Fastpiston
01-30-10, 03:31
Warbucks thank you for the nice words. The fact is that you and SA have presented the one single truism that everyone thinking of investing here should take to heart--though I know that my saying so will not make any difference. There will always be those convinced that they are the exception and that they have all bases covered.

Of all of the expats I know here who own businesses, a few do reasonably well, but their success is modest, enough to meet their needs, and they have no expectation of making huge sums. These guys are smart, and they're also realistic, and careful never to call any attention to themselves. They've also got rock solid marriages and operate, I'm sure, through their wives' names. I do know one guy who is extremely successful, but he's spent years establishing the networks of connections that he needs; years fighting various politicians who tried to remove him once he started to become successful, and years learning the system.

As to me, I would never invest a centavo in this country with any expectation of return. Everything that SA contends is completely true. There's no legal protection here for anyone, including most Filipinos, and certainly not for foreigners.

GE

May I add to GE's sound comments?

It is internationally accepted that 80% of new global businesses fail, usually due to poor market research before start-up. Add to that recession and Philippines and you go to much higher failure rates such as 90%. Assuming one is lucky and gets into the remaining 10%, then breaking even is most common with meager returns the rest. These analyzes do not include time, effort and stress costs (managing local staff; being a foreigner in a local legal system). No, unless you are very, very highly influential in the local scene, best stay away from opening a business.

Take careful note of the World Bank ranking of global countries "Ease of Starting a Business" ranking (accessible on Internet). In the latest report, Philippines is ranked about 135 out of 160 countries researched.

Starchild2012
01-30-10, 15:27
May I add to GE's sound comments?

It is internationally accepted that 80% of new global businesses fail, usually due to poor market research before start-up. Add to that recession and Philippines and you go to much higher failure rates such as 90%. Assuming one is lucky and gets into the remaining 10%, then breaking even is most common with meager returns the rest. These analyzes do not include time, effort and stress costs (managing local staff; being a foreigner in a local legal system). No, unless you are very, very highly influential in the local scene, best stay away from opening a business.

Take careful note of the World Bank ranking of global countries "Ease of Starting a Business" ranking (accessible on Internet). In the latest report, Philippines is ranked about 135 out of 160 countries researched.


I respect your thoughts...but the world is not at all as it sounds to be....80% of business fail not for lack of creativity or money or anything....its just that they are not part of the brotherhood...the freemasons and secret societies.

Its the bridge people call it conspiracy that needs to be crossed to really see..why business fail.

There is no such thing as luck or fate or destiny....if you are not part of the club you ain't gonna be successful ever...hard work has nothing to do it.....probably to start a small shop but to be a big co-orporation you need to be a part of the brotherhood.

I know it would be too hard to digest for 90% of the folks ...but just a few search in google and youtube on freemason would clear the doubts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrTU3DqRxRk

Spooks
01-31-10, 05:55
I respect your thoughts...but the world is not at all as it sounds to be....80% of business fail not for lack of creativity or money or anything....its just that they are not part of the brotherhood...the freemasons and secret societies.

Its the bridge people call it conspiracy that needs to be crossed to really see..why business fail.

There is no such thing as luck or fate or destiny....if you are not part of the club you ain't gonna be successful ever...hard work has nothing to do it.....probably to start a small shop but to be a big co-orporation you need to be a part of the brotherhood.

I know it would be too hard to digest for 90% of the folks ...but just a few search in google and youtube on freemason would clear the doubts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrTU3DqRxRkFrom personal experience getting a business started and keeping it going is possible and very challenging. Some of the challenges are left field and so make it more demanding and shall we say interesting.

In terms of stress, with rare exception, I find what I do now is far less stressful than the proper job I had in the west! I am not a Mason or a Rotarian or Blue Eagle or any other such affiliate.

Return in terms of income from stress experienced is lower income and lower stress than I had in the west In fairness I look at how many businesses failed during 2009 and will probably carry on during 2010 across the world and am grateful we still continue to move on. I think despite reduced profitability during 2009 that if we can still move forward with the worst of economic conditions then we are well placed for any signs of improvement.

The biggest concern is that it is rare we can afford to be away from or businesses for an extended time without standards falling etc. Then again I remember more than a few in the west had the same concerns about taking annual leave etc.

Maybe harder in some places in the Philippines than others for sure. I would not want to be a Bikini bar owner in Angeles or Cebu at the moment!

I see other foreign owned business here, mainstream bars and resorts that seem to be thriving and without any left field pressures. Would I do it again if I had the chance? Then yes I would. I would and am considering other ventures as well.

I may be dumb and I may be stupid, even crazy. Then again perhaps that is what is needed to have a better than expected experience.

Just some thoughts

Spooks

Southbound69
02-13-10, 08:50
Hello,
I have read every report on this thread and could not find anything concerning the following question that I have. Also I have searched the internet with conflicting answers to the following question:

If I marry a Filipina in the US and then decide to live with her in the PI afterwards what is required of me to stay there? Is there a special visa? Is it the balikbayan? And what exactly is that anyway? Do I even need a visa as a spouse of a citizen?

Thanks.

Warbucks
02-13-10, 10:16
Hello,

I have read every report on this thread and could not find anything concerning the following question that I have. Also I have searched the internet with conflicting answers to the following question:

If I marry a Filipina in the US and then decide to live with her in the PI afterwards what is required of me to stay there? Is there a special visa? Is it the balikbayan? And what exactly is that anyway? Do I even need a visa as a spouse of a citizen?

Thanks.http://www.philippine-portal.com/visas/non-quota-permanent-resident-visa-13a.html


Philippines Permanent Resident Visa (13A)

The 13A Resident visa is issued to non-restricted nationals who are legally married to Filipino citizens, to permanently reside in the Philippines as stated in the Philippine Immigration Act of 1940, Section 13 (a).

Requirements

Notarized letter of application by the Filipino spouse

Accomplished and Notarized General Application Form (BI Form No. MCL-07-01)

NSO authenticated copy of the Filipino spouse痴 birth certificate

NSO authenticated copy of the Marriage Contract (if married in the Philippines); or Philippine Embassy or Consulate authenticated copy of the Marriage Contract (if married abroad)

Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate

Photocopy of the foreign spouse痴 passport showing the date of arrival and authorized period to stay
Fees in Pesos

For the initial one year probationary period:

Upon Filing
Application 1,010
Express Lane 500

Upon Implementation
ACR and Form 1,050
Change of Status 600
Passport Visa 200
CRTV and Form 1,450
Implementation 1,000
Legal Research 10/item
Head Tax 250

For the conversion of probationary period to permanent resident visa:

Upon filing
Application 1,010
Express Lane 500

Upon Approval/Implementation

Passport Visa 200
Amendment 500
Immigration Certificate of
Registration (ICR) and Form 1,450
Implementation 500
Legal Research 40
Express Lane 500

Benefits
- Can obtain employment in the Philippines
- Can lease real property
- Can own personal property
- Can qualify for Filipino citizenship after five years of residence in the country

Forms: General Application Form (BI Form No. MCL-07-01)

BI Clearance Certificate

Red Kilt
02-13-10, 13:59
If I marry a Filipina in the US and then decide to live with her in the PI afterwards what is required of me to stay there? Is there a special visa? Is it the balikbayan? And what exactly is that anyway? Do I even need a visa as a spouse of a citizen?

Thanks.Yess you need a visa. As a husband you will get a balikbayan visa (good for 12 months) if you enter WITH THE WIFE and best to have your marriage certificate with you too (especially if she has a Filipino passport in her maiden name)

However, the better way is to make sure your marriage is registered with the Philippines Embassy nearest your place of residence in the USA, and then ask them to send the notification to the National Statistics Office (NSO) in Manila. They will have a special form for it at the Embassy.

When you get to Philippines you can then get a copy of the registration of marriage certificate from the NSO and you can then take it to the BoI and get yourself a spouse visa (plus ICR card) which is a permanent visa.

I thought they would accept a copy of my Australian Marriage Certificate at the BoI but that's too easy. I had to spend a lot of time and money getting the Phils Embassy in Australia to send the details to Manila because I never did it while I was there.

If you are still in the US, do it while you are there.

Matius
02-17-10, 04:31
Hello,
I have read every report on this thread and could not find anything concerning the following question that I have. Also I have searched the internet with conflicting answers to the following question:

If I marry a Filipina in the US and then decide to live with her in the PI afterwards what is required of me to stay there? Is there a special visa? Is it the balikbayan? And what exactly is that anyway? Do I even need a visa as a spouse of a citizen?

Thanks.

You've received some advice in regards to your visa question, but to the question un-asked. Have you been to the Philippines and/or are you considering marrying a girl you've only known through the internet? I ask because, your base questions on a visa would have been answered by most anyone living here that you met, had you been here. If you met the Filipina in the U.S., then suggest you take a vacation to PH, before getting too wrapped up in getting a residency visa. It is easy as chips to get a residency visa here if you marry a Filipina citizen. Its also very easy to get a tourist visa and extensions on that, if you plan is to only spend parts of the year here. But you should also know that divorce is not allowed here and if you terminate your marriage through annullment (much more difficult than getting a visa), then your visa will also be terminated. Oh, and she will end up with all your property here in the Philippines too.

Southbound69
02-18-10, 02:53
You've received some advice in regards to your visa question, but to the question un-asked. Have you been to the Philippines and/or are you considering marrying a girl you've only known through the internet? I ask because, your base questions on a visa would have been answered by most anyone living here that you met, had you been here. If you met the Filipina in the U.S., then suggest you take a vacation to PH, before getting too wrapped up in getting a residency visa. It is easy as chips to get a residency visa here if you marry a Filipina citizen. Its also very easy to get a tourist visa and extensions on that, if you plan is to only spend parts of the year here. But you should also know that divorce is not allowed here and if you terminate your marriage through annullment (much more difficult than getting a visa), then your visa will also be terminated. Oh, and she will end up with all your property here in the Philippines too.


Thanks guys for the good info/advice on my visa question.

To Matius, I have been to the PI many times and have spent several months there in total. I致e had my share of girlfriends there but have since decided to settle down permanently with my fiance. She has passed every test I致e given her with flying colors and she has never given me any reason to doubt her. At some point after she gets settled in here in the US I would like to live part time in the PI then eventually full time.

As far as marriage, we will be getting married in the US so if divorce ever does rear it痴 ugly head it痴 just a simple matter (especially in my state).
Also, I don稚 plan on buying real property in the PI. Much better to rent for many reasons.

MauiDude
02-22-10, 02:48
These "can I start a business in the PI" discussions are about as senseless as the "I'm 70 and she's 18. But I think she really loves me! " threads. They come and go, and no amount of good advice makes a difference.

Even the small upper middle class here will tell you that without strong "big family connections" it's hard for locals with streets named after them to get much done, as a foreigner you're just another target.

Basically. There is no law in the Philippines. The lawyers here will tell you that. This county is an economic sinkhole. It ranks up there with Iran, Libya, Honduras and Yemen and it's nominal inflation rate is 9. 6%. I've been here for about 6 years now and I can tell you for a fact. The local ruling families are happy to sell us condos and let us fuck the help. But if you manage to create anything of real value, it'll get taken.

One noodle stand won't be a problem. 50 noodle stands will get you barred from re-entry while your competitor buys the business assets from a judge.All I see here is family, wealth connections that are necessary for success.

Even then you have big risk.

I made a friend in Puerto Galera, running the sand bar hotel/resort.

I do not know all the details but he was easily murdered and it was family or business conflicts?

Another friend told me that doing business in the PI is easy. Because everyone will have their hands in your pockets. As long as you pay out then no problem. If you don't pay out then may be problem.

I know some business owners and they pay extra for police protection and of course they are extorted by the mayors and other people in government.

My knowlege is very little about this but I see and hear bad things.

I did buy a 22 year lease on a condo apartment.

This has been two years now/ It is working out okay. But I have accepted some substandard practices in dealing with any problems here.

Amavida
04-03-10, 15:02
From personal experience getting a business started and keeping it going is possible and very challenging. Some of the challenges are left field and so make it more demanding and shall we say interesting.

In terms of stress, with rare exception, I find what I do now is far less stressful than the proper job I had in the west! I am not a Mason or a Rotarian or Blue Eagle or any other such affiliate.

Return in terms of income from stress experienced is lower income and lower stress than I had in the west In fairness I look at how many businesses failed during 2009 and will probably carry on during 2010 across the world and am grateful we still continue to move on. I think despite reduced profitability during 2009 that if we can still move forward with the worst of economic conditions then we are well placed for any signs of improvement.

The biggest concern is that it is rare we can afford to be away from or businesses for an extended time without standards falling etc. Then again I remember more than a few in the west had the same concerns about taking annual leave etc.

Maybe harder in some places in the Philippines than others for sure. I would not want to be a Bikini bar owner in Angeles or Cebu at the moment!

I see other foreign owned business here, mainstream bars and resorts that seem to be thriving and without any left field pressures. Would I do it again if I had the chance? Then yes I would. I would and am considering other ventures as well.

I may be dumb and I may be stupid, even crazy. Then again perhaps that is what is needed to have a better than expected experience.

Just some thoughts

SpooksInteresting to read your comment Spooks, my experiences mirror yours exactly. Im inclined to believe your comments are based on real experience here rather hot air.

Yes I have seen many guys blow into the Phils splurge money & them limp back too their home country poorer but those folks would have probably pissed the money away back home just the same IMHO.

I hear ya about not being able to turn your back on the business for long. My Filipino staff fall straight back into doing things 'their' way no matter how much or how long I train them it seems. Filipinos that have worked overseas get it usually, the home team just dont..

AV

GoodEnough
04-03-10, 15:44
Interesting to read your comment Spooks, my experiences mirror yours exactly. Im inclined to believe your comments are based on real experience here rather hot air.

Yes I have seen many guys blow into the Phils splurge money & them limp back too their home country poorer but those folks would have probably pissed the money away back home just the same IMHO.

I hear ya about not being able to turn your back on the business for long. My Filipino staff fall straight back into doing things 'their' way no matter how much or how long I train them it seems. Filipinos that have worked overseas get it usually, the home team just dont..

AV
I can relate well to the comment about not being able to turn your back. I've worked here now for six years, with quite a large local workforce, and the "training" never ends. I think the problem is that the school system here does not encourage independent thinking. At least tacitly, kids are taught from a young ago to follow orders, never to question those in authority, and never to deviate from "the system," no matter how irrational, stupid and illogical the system may be. Couple that with the fact that most Filipinos are frightened of making any sort of decision, and would rather keep passing the buck up the hierarchy, and exacerbate that with the fact that few Filipinos will ever admit to making a mistake, and you've got the recipe for a thoroughly screwed up, non-productive economy, which is pretty much what the country has.

I have a couple of friends in Davao, both expatriates, who operate high end restaurants here. So long as the proprietors are on the premises and overseeing the kitchens, everything runs relatively well. As soon as they leave however--whether to take a short holiday, or because of temporary illness--things start to fall apart immediately. It's gotten to the point that I will not go to these places if the owners aren't there because I know it's going to be a disaster.

While I can admire Spooks and others for their willingness to risk personal capital, it's something I would never consider doing here under any circumstances.

GE

Red Kilt
04-04-10, 03:26
I can relate well to the comment about not being able to turn your back. I've worked here now for six years, with quite a large local workforce, and the "training" never ends. I think the problem is that the school system here does not encourage independent thinking. At least tacitly, kids are taught from a young ago to follow orders, never to question those in authority, and never to deviate from "the system," no matter how irrational, stupid and illogical the system may be. Couple that with the fact that most Filipinos are frightened of making any sort of decision, and would rather keep passing the buck up the hierarchy, and exacerbate that with the fact that few Filipinos will ever admit to making a mistake, and you've got the recipe for a thoroughly screwed up, non-productive economy, which is pretty much what the country has...................


An excellent summary of the filipino worker GE.
I have lived here for 12 years and i work in the education system and believe me, we are trying to make a difference to this mindset by trying to change the curriculum. The most annoying thing that I hear anywhere in the Philippines is the response "Sir we always do it this way" to my question "Why are you doing that?"
GE is right. These happy sweet lovely people are not taught how to think, how to analyse a situation or how to consider alternatives that might be more effective and efficient, and so they just go on doing what they have always done or keep accepting silly practices because it has "always been done this way".

Amavida
04-04-10, 13:05
An excellent summary of the filipino worker GE.
I have lived here for 12 years and i work in the education system and believe me, we are trying to make a difference to this mindset by trying to change the curriculum. The most annoying thing that I hear anywhere in the Philippines is the response "Sir we always do it this way" to my question "Why are you doing that?"
GE is right. These happy sweet lovely people are not taught how to think, how to analyse a situation or how to consider alternatives that might be more effective and efficient, and so they just go on doing what they have always done or keep accepting silly practices because it has "always been done this way".RK, you & GE make good points about the education system which I agree with. They are simply not exposed to or taught analytical thinking in their schools.

But there is something else. Something cultural. Behind the smiles & the 'yes kuya' there is a stubborn determination to do what they want. We label the men hypermacho but the women are really just as stubborn.

Even when shown a better way & great pains are taken to explain clearly & simply _why_ its better by their friggin _employer_ for christ's sakes they will _still_ revert back to doing it 'their way' no matter how stupidly wrong it is.

It seems they simply cannot admit when they are wrong... ever!

Neophytes see these people as laid back, happy go lucky & gushing/fawning to foreigners but its all an act.

Ever seen what happens when a guy gets into an argument over another guys chick or some other quarrel? These 'happy go lucky' people will turn into a viscous mob & bash/knife the guy to death in public.. a none of the onlookers will raise a finger to stop it - including the barangay police.

There is a dark side to these people... Never trust them to much. You are not & never will be in their tribe.

The only thing they truly respect is 'connections'.

AV

Henski
04-04-10, 15:00
Hi All

Long time lurker here, who has been hitting dead ends searching online to help with applying for AEP and 9G visa by myself.

I know this question may be unorthodox for this forum but I'm running out of options for where to ask next,

Abit about me

I am from Sydney Australia, 28 yr old guy looking to relocate to Philippines for 1 or 2 years.

Before I get jumped on, Yes I know how good things are in Oz.

My thinking is: in the 45 year corporate rat race, what is 2 years out of my life? I tried something new when I was young and under 30, single, no debt, no commitments. Who know if I'll come back after a few years even.

I'm risk averse to pack in my job and go just move, I'm also not totally inexperienced/naive with life in s. E asia to a degree I've backpacked through Cambodia, Vietnam for a small while.

Sorry I have a big set of questions below.

Appreciate any advice anyone can give

I have been emailing back and forth with a company in quezon city about a job opportunity in my field.

I'm hitting stone walls asking in-depth questions on the AEP and 9G visa process with the local consulate

The challenge is the company that is offering the opportunity is relatively small and thus do not have the time or resources to arrange submission of the Alien EmploymentPermit (AEP) forms and then subsequently the 9G PRE-ARRANGED EMPLOYMENT VISA.

So basically the job is 95% mine if I can do the leg work and secure the above.

Has anyone successfully applied and received AEP while not actually being in the Philippines? Anyone from Australia?

How did you do this? (I'm still pushing for answer from local consulate, their obvious statement is just fly there)

Some websites suggest you can apply for your AEP through local consulate/embassy, instead of the most common statement being the DOLE office in ph.

I understand the but the 9G visa can really only be applied for when actually in the country but to lessen my risk (risk of having AEP denied), I'm holding out to have the AEP approved before relocating and then applying for the 9G visa.

2)

Has anyone had their AEP denied?

Is it likely a 9G pre employment visa can be rejected by BI even if AEP is approved by the DOLE dept?

I'm trying to find out how rigorously does the DOLE scrutinise and test section 10 of AEP application

For example, if I secure the employment contract and am formally offered the job then take the big step to sell my things in Australia, resign my current job and move to the Philippines.

If the AEP and/or 9G visa is denied I will essentially have to return to Australia to no job, no apartment etc, tail between my legs.

I will be bringing my unique experience to this potential job position but as this being a foreign country and government I know I can't assume to how this is accepted and influences approval or denial of the AEP

Or the other more difficult hedged approach I see I may pursue is to secure holidays from my current Job (in late April or start of may), fly to Philippines, action the applications and then resign via email if all goes through fine.

3)

Can anyone help with the below requirements for the AEP and 9g?

AEP

- Letter of request sent to DoLE anyone have template/copy they could direct me to download from?

9G

- Letter request from the petitioner/organization anyone have template/copy they could direct me to download from?

- Bureau of Immigration Clearance Certificate? How is this secured? Or is it part of the process when applying for 9G at the BI in the Philippines?

Sorry for all the questions above, but I have really come to a dead end on this and am trying as many angles as I can think of.

I really do appreciate any feedback.

This challenge still has not dampened my enthusiasm to secure the job and

Move to the Philippines, but its a hurdle.

Again sorry for the length of this post

Thanks

EDITOR'S NOTE: I would suggest that the author or another Forum Member consider posting a link to this report in the Reports of Distinction thread. Please Click Here (http://www.internationalsexguide.info/forum/announcement-reportsofdistinction.php) for more information.

Bob Bowie
04-05-10, 01:39
[QUOTE=Henski]Hi All

Long time lurker here, who has been hitting dead ends searching online to help with applying for AEP and 9G visa by myself.



Henski, you may want to joine a couple of the yahoo Philippines group. Join the groups with the largest amount of members. Most of the members are expats that visit the P.I often and may have some advice for you.

If I were you, I would use some vacation time and try to be proactive with your visas The locals Pinoys will not be as motivated to complete the visa paperwork as you are. Also you can research places that you will want to live.

Red Kilt
04-05-10, 06:49
I'm still pushing for answer from local consulate, their obvious statement is just fly there)Really mate - the only solution is to fly here and do it all when here.

I work with Aust government agencies based in the Phils and when we bring in consultants of any type we always do all the ground work when you are in-country.

When I first came here I landed on a 21-day tourist visa and sorted out all the paper work after that. If your company really wants you then they will provide you with the documents that you want. But you will need to go to Bureau of Immig and Dept Foreign Affairs in Manila to establish exactly what is needed.

The worst that can happen is that you cannot organise it on the ground (HIGHLY unlikely). But the other side is that you will get a chance to check out the scene, the company, your potential workmates etc and your decision will be much better informed.

Rubberyman
04-06-10, 10:30
RK, you & GE make good points about the education system which I agree with. They are simply not exposed to or taught analytical thinking in their schools.

But there is something else. Something cultural. Behind the smiles & the 'yes kuya' there is a stubborn determination to do what they want. We label the men hypermacho but the women are really just as stubborn.

Even when shown a better way & great pains are taken to explain clearly & simply _why_ its better by their friggin _employer_ for christ's sakes they will _still_ revert back to doing it 'their way' no matter how stupidly wrong it is.

It seems they simply cannot admit when they are wrong... ever!

Neophytes see these people as laid back, happy go lucky & gushing/fawning to foreigners but its all an act.

Ever seen what happens when a guy gets into an argument over another guys chick or some other quarrel? These 'happy go lucky' people will turn into a viscous mob & bash/knife the guy to death in public.. a none of the onlookers will raise a finger to stop it - including the barangay police.

There is a dark side to these people... Never trust them to much. You are not & never will be in their tribe.

The only thing they truly respect is 'connections'.

AV

While I don't doubt what you say is largely true, it is also true of just about every other culture too.

Just look at the hoo-ha in the USA recently over healthcare if you want to see how another culture likes having change imposed on it. I emphasise that I don't want to get into the healthcare argument at all, but it is a prime example of where a particular culture does things its own way and many many people in that culture reckon that their way of doing things is the best in the world and they resist change fighting, screaming and kicking (Literally) and have made it clear that they will repeal those changes if they can.

Similarly, in Australia, the previous government wanted to change industrial laws - again, fighting, kicking, screaming and a significant repeal of the laws.

In the same way that many US citizens living overseas and seeing that healthcare in other modern economies has not caused the end of the world as they know it, so too, do overseas Filipino workers on their return in terms of work practices.

Very few cultures will accept outside intervention without serious resistance - it is one of the universal problems for someone from the outside coming in and thinking that they can just get someone to change just because they are paying for it....just ask the ever suffering US taxpayer on that one!

Henski
04-08-10, 16:48
Really mate - the only solution is to fly here and do it all when here.
I work with Aust government agencies based in the Phils and when we bring in consultants of any type we always do all the ground work when you are in-country.
When I first came here I landed on a 21-day tourist visa and sorted out all the paper work after that. If your company really wants you then they will provide you with the documents that you want. But you will need to go to Bureau of Immig and Dept Foreign Affairs in Manila to establish exactly what is needed.

The worst that can happen is that you cannot organise it on the ground (HIGHLY unlikely). But the other side is that you will get a chance to check out the scene, the company, your potential workmates etc and your decision will be much better informed.

The best local site to check out is www.livinginthephilippines.com

Heaps of information for you there.Yep I'm hiring a local immigration lawyer in Manila, too hard doing it alone from here.

Shout out to any fellow Aussies in Manila? How many out there here? And sorry I mean guys under 40 I guess, not 60 yr olds pumped on V, I'm only 28

I may be moving over in 4 weeks, working in Quezon City.

Wicked Roger
04-09-10, 08:27
Yep I'm hiring a local immigration lawyer in Manila, too hard doing it alone from here.

Shout out to any fellow Aussies in Manila? How many out there here? And sorry I mean guys under 40 I guess, not 60 yr olds pumped on V, I'm only 28

I may be moving over in 4 weeks, working in Quezon City.
Henski

Many guys are over 40...and some are pumped uo without C or V :D

At your age you may burn out so soon enough you may be seen around Oxford Suites getting the energy tablets :)

Some like younger IMHO as you are fitter but many like older as we are more respectful.......well I am I think a gentleman..:D

Have fun, sorry we wont meet as am over 40 despite being an Aussie

Henski
04-10-10, 00:39
Henski

Many guys are over 40...and some are pumped uo without C or V :D

At your age you may burn out so soon enough you may be seen around Oxford Suites getting the energy tablets :)

Some like younger IMHO as you are fitter but many like older as we are more respectful.......well I am I think a gentleman..:D

Have fun, sorry we wont meet as am over 40 despite being an AussieYep ok :-) I guess ill have a better idea when im over there, so will pull back and pre-conceived ideas i might have until landed.

im liasing with my work for renting a small condo not far from work, just off quezon ave. 9K a month, security building etc - i'll wait till i see it but the price and location seems good.

Warbucks
04-10-10, 07:49
Yep I'm hiring a local immigration lawyer in Manila, too hard doing it alone from here.

Shout out to any fellow Aussies in Manila? How many out there here? And sorry I mean guys under 40 I guess, not 60 yr olds pumped on V, I'm only 28

I may be moving over in 4 weeks, working in Quezon City.You should try to get close to one of these 60 year olds and try to soak up some game from them. Well not all of them some of the older guys are (old)man-childs but I am sure you can figure that out with a little reading.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=man+child


Yep ok :-) I guess ill have a better idea when im over there, so will pull back and pre-conceived ideas i might have until landed.

im liasing with my work for renting a small condo not far from work, just off quezon ave. 9K a month, security building etc - i'll wait till i see it but the price and location seems good.PS 9KPHP ($200) monthly rent is a paltry sum for a decent place. Don't expect much.

Amavida
04-10-10, 07:50
Yep ok :-) I guess ill have a better idea when im over there, so will pull back and pre-conceived ideas i might have until landed.

im liasing with my work for renting a small condo not far from work, just off quezon ave. 9K a month, security building etc - i'll wait till i see it but the price and location seems good.Broadly four groups of foreigner in Phils you will encounter : Younger blue collar guys been to LOS & in venturing PI to party hard. Younger white collar guys there on company business & enjoying the scene in their spare time. Younger white collar guys doing there own thing here. Older retired (divorced) men enjoying their sexual liberation from western pussy tyranny.

The latter group comprise the largest group because they have the money & the time.

Im an Aussie but I dont meet you strict requirements for friendship either, nevermind.

9K is _VERY_ cheap for a 'condo' in QC!! You sure bout that cobber?

Cheers mate
AV

Henski
04-10-10, 15:47
Broadly four groups of foreigner in Phils you will encounter : Younger blue collar guys been to LOS & in venturing PI to party hard. Younger white collar guys there on company business & enjoying the scene in their spare time. Younger white collar guys doing there own thing here. Older retired (divorced) men enjoying their sexual liberation from western pussy tyranny.

The latter group comprise the largest group because they have the money & the time.

Im an Aussie but I dont meet you strict requirements for friendship either, nevermind.

9K is _VERY_ cheap for a 'condo' in QC!! You sure bout that cobber?

Cheers mate,

AVMate, nothing is sure thats for sure, they are likely talking it way up.

Stroker Ace88
04-10-10, 17:10
Yep ok :-) I guess ill have a better idea when im over there, so will pull back and pre-conceived ideas i might have until landed.

im liasing with my work for renting a small condo not far from work, just off quezon ave. 9K a month, security building etc - i'll wait till i see it but the price and location seems good.

Henski,

Whooooo Whooo Whoooo down there minute, and give yourself time to think things through. I can tell from your posts that you have already swallowed this job hook, line and sinker, but have you been to the Philippines before? No offence but why are you so hell-bent on this job anyways? The online ad must have been so perfect that the job was sent from heaven on a silver platter. Awwwhhh, well so are some emails I receive about how I am the heir to 40million in African gold and all I have to do is send a small fee to release the gold and pay the transfers. Sigh.

Are you trying to get lawyers involved and rent condos even before you have stepped into the Philippines? I know you want to get all the issues out of the way and taken care of as soon as you can, but I think Red Kilt's info was spot on. IMHO, you need to slow down, take a step back and think about things. Here are a few issues I see with your plans.

Where did you hear about this job offer, was it through a trustworthy source or just a job posting online somewhere? Did you google the company name and check them out? You mentioned they are a small firm, and that's red flag number one for me!

Make sure the job offered is actually the job you will be doing, because sometimes the lines between the office job you were offered and loading boxes in the back can be one in the same in the PI and they might get a laugh having the "imported guy" do manual work.

How many people work at this firm, and have they ever hired someone from outside the Philippines in the past and how did it turn out? Will you be working with other foreign nationals or is the staff all local? How come they can't fill the position with someone local? Red flag number two!

If they have never hired anyone from outside the Philippines this should tell you something and you should be very careful, and as others have mentioned working with locals in the PI can be a frustrating experince. When you asked them about the work visa and the process involved in obtaining the proper visas what did they say? This response should tell you if they know what they are doing and will help you, or you are on your own. Also don't think you will walk right in and fix the problems in the company even if the issues are easy to fix. The PI people are very stubborn and do not accept change very well, so that could be your biggest issue.

Are you asked to sign a contract for the lenght of your employment with this firm even before you have visited the company in person and figured out for yourself if the job is right for you? You mentioned the company is suggesting you can live in a 9k a month condo?? Red flag number three!

Many locals in the Philippines have no idea about our standards of living in the Western World and as such many think the basics are all that is required. BE CAREFUL! I would strongly suggest when it comes to your living situation you rent a hotel room when you first arrive in Manila then search for your own place. Check out the 9k condo and use that as a basis to compare other places you see. Be warned that as a foreigner the price per month offered to you will be much higher than that of a local for any condo and IMO security and noise levels should be your main concern. Ask if utilities such as water and cable are included. Don't ever think about renting a condo in the PI without seeing it in person and 9k is very low for a decent place.

The best advice I can give you is to relate a story about someone else who was in a simillar spot as you. It was 6 months ago and I was on the 14hr PAL flight from Vancouver-Manila. I was seated next to another younger Canadian guy and as he boarded the plane in his suit jacket he looked nervous and wide-eyed. For 13hrs we never spoke and it was only when he asked to borrow my pen to fill out the immigration card that we got to talk and he told me his story. He had met a girl online, a nice girl he claimed and he was head over heels in love with her. I could just tell from the way he talked that this trip meant alot to him. This was his first trip anywhere and he was nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs. He looked at me with a puzzled look as I told him this was my 5th trip within 12months to the Philippines, and that I was going to stop in Manila for 2days to see one girl while my main girl in Cebu waited and thought I was busy on a flight somewhere.

This guy was fresh meat and the girl in Manila had him hook, line and sinker. She was supposed to be from the Province, but lived in Manila for work she told him. She had convinced him in advance to rent and pay for a condo in Makati for his full three week stay, and ohhh guess what she had invited her whole family from the Province including mom and dad and her sister with the three kids to come and stay with him in the condo. This guy was fresh meat and I could just tell he was already in a world of trouble, and yet the look in his eyes was one of hope, of love. The whole family had some serious plans for him before he even hit the ground and he did not even know it.

He asked me about the simplest of questions, like the best way to take out money. He planned to use his credit card everywhere, which I told him was a huge no-no. To withdraw money from an ATM and to max withdraw the amount to save on fees. Oh boy. Anyways I tried to impart some wisdom in the 30min we had left in the flight but I am not sure how much sunk in. I told him to be careful to watch out for things. I also told him to be careful when he went out with the family grocery shopping and if they were asking to borrow money. I am sure the family was going to buy several 25killo bags of rice and there will be so much left over and so no need to waste the rice they will just take it back to there house. Small things lead to bigger things.

I asked him if he planned to have sex with his GF and he told me she had promised him many things. I laughed and then told him if her mom and dad will be in the next room, how much loving will he get, and the look on his face told me he never even thought about that. Sigh.

He mentioned to me since the flight landed at 4am, he told his GF to only come at 5am, and I laughed so hard the girl in the next row who was listening to our conversation even laughed. I told him she will be there at 1am just to make sure she will get to him first and I would bet anything the whole family will be with her.

We landed and he walked with me as we went through the airport and as we stood in the immigration line I told him he was going to sweat buckets in that jacket and he told me he was not used to such high humidity. I stood in line and behind me there was a window with about 40people stuck up against the glass looking in like a fishbowl even at 4am, so I asked him to look at the window and see if he could spot her. He turned and told me he was sure she was not there at the airport yet, and I laughed again. I turned around and waved to the people and about 8 girls I did not know waved back at me and smiled. I told him "welcome to the Philippines".

I tired to explain on the flight how to spot a good girl from a bar girl or atleast a girl who already had a foreign BF. I told him to look at her shoes, her purse, her CP and the jewelry around her neck and if they all look expensive then chances are something is going on.

As we left the terminal I was headed to the yellow meter taxi and he was going to look for his GF, and I told him she would be there. I scammed the crowds quickly and he asked me if alot of people smoked in the PI? I laughed and said thats the pollution in the air not smoke and the look on his face was priceless.

I spotted a girl making her way in his direction and I pointed her out as she ran into his arms for a hug. I checked her out and could see no obvious signs of she was a BG. She was good looking and I could see why he had fallen so deeply for her. I shook his hand and said goodbye to him and wished him well and off they went, the whole family in tow. I wished I had exchanged emails with him to see how it all worked out. Deep inside I knew what was in store for him, oh well, we all make mistakes.

Henski, I am not trying to rain on your parade, just rather to try to stop and make you think this through. I urge you to not make any serious commitments without first being on the ground in Manila and seeing for yourself what is going on. Only you can make the call and since everyone has this imaginary image in there heads about the way things will be like in the Philippines before they arrive, the reality is often very different.

Good luck and let us know how it all turned out.

Going Low
04-12-10, 11:35
Living here in the Philippines is easy if you know what to do and if you have connections. As it is not very safe place for foreigners, travelling here needs some precautions.

My friend can get you a permanent visa easily unless you are a criminal, or you have HIV or you are a Japanese. In these cases it is not possible, but it causes more work (more money). Like in my case, it took only 2 months to get permanent residency visa. As if you normally just apply for that, it'll take years and it is still almost impossible to get.

I myself are offering car rental in Metro Manila area with or without a driver / tour guide. And of course, I wont charge extra from foreigners as I am one myself too.

It is also possible for me to find a nice place where to stay during your travel here, it is more fun to stay example in a secure condo than to pay hotel for every day.

If you have any questions, just email me at: [Email address deleted by Admin]

I can give all kinds of advises regarding Philippines, travelling here, staying here or what ever you might want to ask.

Peter

EDITOR's NOTE: This report was edited to remove email addresses in the text. Please do not post email addresses in the Forum. Instead, please invite other Forum Members to contact you directly via the Forum's Private Messaging system. Thanks!

Thaifun
04-13-10, 16:07
Living here in the Philippines is easy if you know what to do and if you have connections. As it is not very safe place for foreigners, travelling here needs some precautions.

My friend can get you a permanent visa easily unless you are a criminal, or you have HIV or you are a Japanese. In these cases it is not possible, but it causes more work (more money). Like in my case, it took only 2 months to get permanent residency visa. As if you normally just apply for that, it'll take years and it is still almost impossible to get.

I myself are offering car rental in Metro Manila area with or without a driver / tour guide. And of course, I wont charge extra from foreigners as I am one myself too.

It is also possible for me to find a nice place where to stay during your travel here, it is more fun to stay example in a secure condo than to pay hotel for every day.

If you have any questions, just email me at: [Email address deleted by Admin]

I can give all kinds of advises regarding Philippines, travelling here, staying here or what ever you might want to ask.

Peter

EDITOR's NOTE: This report was edited to remove email addresses in the text. Please do not post email addresses in the Forum. Instead, please invite other Forum Members to contact you directly via the Forum's Private Messaging system. Thanks!


totally useless post. google for the SSRV retirement program. The office is MOST helpful. You can do the police checkup on the premises. The nurses for the health check pick you up at the office.
All is done very fast and professional. Bank branches where you need to open a deposit account are within a short walking distance.

To spend 1 centavo on services to facilitate the visa process is literally burning the money for nothing.

I dont know about the other services offered but if someone offers non-existent (he simply cant do more than the office ladies) services then caution is advised. It looks to me that someone is hoping to milk a newbie.

Maybe a sticky with the SSRV details and website would be helpful. It saves a bit of scrolling down through the posts.

Brymor
04-13-10, 19:10
I myself are offering car rental in Metro Manila area with or without a driver / tour guide. And of course, I wont charge extra from foreigners as I am one myself too.

Your three posts so far are just poor efforts at touting for business. Your statement above instills no confidence whatsoever, some of the biggest sharks in Asia are themselves expats.

Starchild2012
04-14-10, 03:48
Your three posts so far are just poor efforts at touting for business. Your statement above instills no confidence whatsoever, some of the biggest sharks in Asia are themselves expats.

Very well said, Avoid doing business with farangs here, it will cost a leg and an arm..the same western prices and high chances of fraud.

Last year, lots of Cebu expats got burned by investing in a farang sponsored shipping freight investment, the guy just took the money and went to some other country.

I myself am indian and lots of third fourth generation Indians who do business here, but i never interacted with them or think of doing anything with them. They have spoiled the image of India beyond repair, if it ain't was before.

The point is not all farangs are bad, we know that, but those who are doing business here have to make some tough decisions which never goes in your favor.

PH is for fun. Period. If you don't have enough money to come here, don't. Its hard.....making some money here

Going Low
04-14-10, 04:03
totally useless post. google for the SSRV retirement program. The office is MOST helpful. You can do the police checkup on the premises. The nurses for the health check pick you up at the office.

All is done very fast and professional. Bank branches where you need to open a deposit account are within a short walking distance.

To spend 1 centavo on services to facilitate the visa process is literally burning the money for nothing.

I dont know about the other services offered but if someone offers non-existent (he simply cant do more than the office ladies) services then caution is advised. It looks to me that someone is hoping to milk a newbie.

Maybe a sticky with the SSRV details and website would be helpful. It saves a bit of scrolling down through the posts.Your absolutely correct.

If you can fill all the requirements, you might get your Visa very fast.

All people might not have all requirements to get investors visa, retirement visa or what ever is needed. We can arrange Permanent residency Visa to anyone no matter what is your health state or criminal records.

I am posting this only to give a chance to those people who are not possible to advance through the normal procedure line. Normally you might get the PRV after five years of stay, but we can arrange that in few months.

I am not interested in money, I don't need it. I am only trying to help those who can not do it themselves, or it is for some reason impossible.

Thanks,

Peter

Going Low
04-14-10, 05:14
Your three posts so far are just poor efforts at touting for business. Your statement above instills no confidence whatsoever, some of the biggest sharks in Asia are themselves expats.Thanks for the opinion, sad to see where this world has come.

I am not interested in arguing, just posted/registered here since I saw a lot of visitors on our website coming from here.

My apology, just trying to be fair.

Thaifun
04-14-10, 13:50
Your absolutely correct.

We can arrange Permanent residency Visa to anyone no matter what is your health state or criminal records.Meaning he is using this board to promote criminal activities.

Going Low
04-15-10, 10:57
Meaning he is using this board to promote criminal activities.Nothing criminal, just assistance in visas.

Redman69
04-15-10, 13:45
I am an x-con in the states. I asked Low a few questions. I am aware of the PRA from this board. I have always wondered about the back ground check. I have been a good boy since 82 doing it one day at a time. I hope to hear from him on how that works.

But, I am glad that you other members has shared the info over the years also.

Hope to make a return trip with in a year for a few weeks. Got married there in Cebu in 91 and seperated here in 01 and divorced in 03. We lost the last baby and have gone our own ways. I just turned 55 and the youngest girl is 15. oldest 17. I would hope to be doing 3 months a year in 5 years.

This is like many of you all. Also I have found good info on the living in Cebu form. Beware they mostly like to take up with the women on a full time bases. Not a mongers board, but a good bunch of guys with good info on the south area's. I do like Cebu, as said got married there. Also my mother-inlaw is still with us and she is in Agusan Del Norte. We had her approved to come over but she had been exposed to TB and needed to take 9 months of drugs which she would not do. So, she is still there. And the Grandmother of my children. I do know about supporting the clan, That part just ended with the last niece finishing at Davao's doctors college. But, I will help grandma whenever needed.

Thanks for all the info over the years. I addmitt I look at the pictures first.

Thaifun
04-22-10, 13:27
Nothing criminal, just assistance in visas.

Assistance with visas, especially the SRRV visa, is not really needed. the office is most helpful and considerate. They do all they can to make it happen. So there just a few cases which are not eligible. To obtain a "visa" through channels other than the regular by bypassing the health-check or submitting false information and bribing officials is illegal. The people engaging in it are risking serious consequences and I m not sure that anyone would love to have that sword hanging over his head as he would be sitting duck all that time.

The RP national bureau of investigation's background check in the SRRV office was extremely simple. They ask you to provide photo, take your finger prints. They want to know where you stayed in RP plus some other details. I do not think that they ever checked with my embassy etc about my record (there is none). They are concerned about the RP record.

I could have provided a statement from my home country but then they preferred to make the 250 peso (less than 5.5 US) for their own check.

It does not hurt to go to the office in Makati and talk to the staff get all the details. If you feel comfy just walk down the hall to the police officers and pay the 250 and have some photos ready (I dont recall if they took some, however, I dont think so).

In other words, I would not be worried about stories 30 years past or even 5 years - unless it happened in RP.

Redman69
04-22-10, 15:55
Thanks Thaifun,

I agree that I do not want anything hanging over my head. And I told low the same. And I feel more confident about doing it in PI now that you have shared your info.

Thanks again all.

Thaifun
04-23-10, 08:08
Thanks Thaifun,

I agree that I do not want anything hanging over my head. And I told low the same. And I feel more confident about doing it in PI now that you have shared your info.

Thanks again all.

you're welcome. Look, Ii m traveling a lot and stayed in many different places. Never ever I saw such a good service and never ever such a welcoming office staff. In Thailand you're treated as a criminal suspect if not sub-human once you stand in front of immigration. And it is there that the tea money culture is ripe - I would not doubt it if posters could report similar stories from other places.
In other words, the offer made by this shadowy and recently signed up person is based on the assumption that interested parties know about such deals in other places and have zero experience with the SRRV office staff.
I have the visa. It took my 2 months because I was traveling and could not do it asap.
A reasonable schedule for you would be like that:
Prepare yourself with some cash on hand. You will need around 1500 US for fees (but only if you want to pay right away, no need for that though), have the police fee ready in small notes in Peso, bring around 3K Peso for medical bills and taxi. Go to the office, let them talk you through the process. If you're ok, immediately do the police check. It takes about 2 weeks to get the ok.

Importantly, make sure you go there at 9 sharp in the morning to avoid waiting in line. Take a number at the entrance even if the guy is not there or wait for him. Often he is not there. The first time i simply waited without the number. The staff was embarrassed and got me a low number then. The office is the Citibank tower right at the Ayala triangle. They ask for a piece of ID to enter and upstairs you will need your passport. So give them some other government issued ID as you want to avoid running up and down in the elevators.
If you feel confident about the police business, do the medical check right away. They pick you up at the place and you pay the taxi. Takes about 2 hrs. Then go back and get a letter explaining your need for a time deposit account with an approved bank. They have the list. Take the letter or if this takes too long go to the bank and open an account (I dont think i paid one single cent for that). Then report to the office which bank you decided on. They will fax the letter but later you need to bring the original from the office. The bank needs some photos, xeroxes your passport and also wants an address. The office needs around 12 photos. You might like to pay fees now or better postpone the 1400 US payment.

After two weeks you know about the police and medical reports. Medical takes 1 day, maybe 2 workdays. Now pay the fee in the office and transfer the money to the bank. Make sure the banks dont deduct transaction fees. But you never know. So bring some small US bills with you to cover small fees in cash there. They really want the 50K and not 49.988 US. Open a savings account for your interested to be deposited into. It's free.

Submit your bank statement to the office together with passport. It takes another 10 working days (max. mine took 7) for you visa to be issued and inserted. You can call in order to avoid unnecessary visits.

Then pick up you're visa and new ID card. The id card is free for the 1st year, thereafter 10 US per year. You might like to pay 20 US to get a 3 yr validity. In other words, for the next three years no contact with anyone!

You will need of course an address in RP to be registered. I gave that of a friend and it was no issue at all.

I m sure that a wife who is a RP citizen will be helpful as well as kids. I m a single bachelor. The nurses at the medical center were all over me and I had to protect my cell phone number like my life. Of course they know for sure all they needed to know: single, healthy, 45 magnum hidden behind the zipper.

So for those hopeless bachelors: You even might get married to a certified nurse 30 yrs younger than you while going through the process.

Also, make sure you had enough sex the night before. Some of the office ladies are smoking hot. It is difficult to move through the place with a hard-on - trust me on this. In other words, if you just want to sit in an aircon place and watch some really good looking women - that office is the place to go. Free cold water etc is on offer and just lean back, relax, and enjoy the view. When I had to go there I never felt that I was wasting time during the wait. Married men, of course, are advised to show up alone. Otherwise trouble might be brewing.

As for the special offer. I think a special fuck off is due.

Robbaf
04-23-10, 10:53
Great information Thaifun, Thanks:)

How long is the time deposit required? I am under Embassy Visa, but I am thinking about applying and staying here when I retire. I am 44, but retired military and working as an Expat, and you can bank money fast:) so I am looking at two more years:)

Robb

Thaifun
04-23-10, 13:01
Great information Thaifun, Thanks:)

How long is the time deposit required? I am under Embassy Visa, but I am thinking about applying and staying here when I retire. I am 44, but retired military and working as an Expat, and you can bank money fast:) so I am looking at two more years:)

Robb

Under 50 years you are required to deposit 50 K US transferred from abroad. Over 50 years of age it is 20K. The deposit will be locked by the SRRV office and it takes 30 days, I think, to unlock in case you want to terminate your SRRV. Obviously, all fees paid are lost in that case.

You can use the money for investing into a condo or some other limited choice of assets but that in case you end up paying a yearly appraisal fee (around 500 US). The SRRV office will check if your assets cover the 50K US.

Your regular income might make a difference but you better check with them on their website or simply call. Since your embassy they will roll out an even bigger red carpet.

It is really no rocket science or a mystery (like in Thailand). Do not use leeches. I heard the SRRV office has approved representatives who help at NO CHARGE, apparently they even provide free transfers from Angeles (taxi stile). I still need to hear of anyone who had a bad or less than perfect experience with them. These are specially trained ladies, probably selected for their looks as well, and it is more like going to a hotel reception desk than visiting an office.

I can simply not see why anyone would try to bypass them and undergo all associated risk. Once you are on an illegal visa the officials and middlemen involved can turn you into a constant source of income for them. Extortion is not unknown in RP and why would anyone depend on a faked record or health report with 50 K in the bank just waiting to be seized?

This low life offer is nothing but a big scam trying to get to your dollars. You need to pay your fees personally or through your representative. They xerox every single banknote with their serial numbers and you have to sign the xerox copy. So there is no saving of fees or deposits, no escape as you sign at every single step of the way.
The health check is conducted by approved clinics. The same who issue certificates for the US and Europe. I doubt that any clinic would risk its business which is based on OFWs and not SRRV applicants. The applicants wont make even 5 % of the company's business. The OFW certificates are much more detailed and costly.

As the person told us, he has a lot of other stuff to offer. I wonder if he has any reports of satisfied customers or offers legal recourse in case of failure. There are enough criminals on the run in SE Asia. Pattaya, Hua Hin, Angeles, etc you name it. No need to deal with them or their local equivalents.

Once you have done it right, you can stay as long as you wish in RP. No time limits like in Malaysia (10 years) or Thailand (1 year). If you calculate the increased fees for other visas and the costs associated with them (travel to the office, hotel etc.) , the SRRV might come cheaper even with its high fee and the cost of capital. The interest rate on the deposit is bad thus the loss of interest should be considered an expense.

Robbaf
04-23-10, 22:59
Under 50 years you are required to deposit 50 K US transferred from abroad. Over 50 years of age it is 20K. The deposit will be locked by the SRRV office and it takes 30 days, I think, to unlock in case you want to terminate your SRRV. Obviously, all fees paid are lost in that case.
Thanks great information:)

Robb

Starchild2012
04-24-10, 10:49
Under 50 years you are required to deposit 50 K US transferred from abroad. Over 50 years of age it is 20K. The deposit will be locked by the SRRV office and it takes 30 days, I think, to unlock in case you want to terminate your SRRV. Obviously, all fees paid are lost in that case.


Thanks for the info, didn't know about this.

Gallantnitez
06-20-10, 04:21
I have been curious about Philippines for some time but have been unable to get straight answers from most sources - probably because I cannot offer straight information to most people. I am an ex-felon in the US with an old felony record that I am concerned could interfere with any travel plans. I have read that travelers can stay in the RP for 21 days without a visa and can extend to 90 days with visa. Question 1: can I qualify for a visa? Question 2: What are my options? I have considered periodic flights to Guam or Taiwan to renew my passport stamp. Is this doable? What is the typical method for immigration for most expats in the RP, and more importantly, can an expat expect the same benefits?

I am also interested in sailing the Pacific and am curious if anyone is familiar with the port entry regulations in the PH. Thank you.

Red Kilt
06-20-10, 09:46
I have been curious about Philippines for some time but have been unable to get straight answers from most sources - probably because I cannot offer straight information to most people. I am an ex-felon in the US with an old felony record that I am concerned could interfere with any travel plans. I have read that travelers can stay in the RP for 21 days without a visa and can extend to 90 days with visa. Question 1: can I qualify for a visa? Question 2: What are my options? I have considered periodic flights to Guam or Taiwan to renew my passport stamp. Is this doable? What is the typical method for immigration for most expats in the RP, and more importantly, can an expat expect the same benefits?

I am also interested in sailing the Pacific and am curious if anyone is familiar with the port entry regulations in the PH. Thank you.

You can get an on-arrival visa good for 21 days. After that you can go to any Bureau of Immigration office (there are many around the Phils) and get an extension for 38 days without any checks on your record. No need to leave the Phils for that.
Any further extensions after the 59 days are now a bit more complicated.

The biggest problem might be the boxes you have to tick when you fill out the arrival card. I cannot remember whether it asks if you have ever been convicted for anything in another country or not. I don't think it does.

GoodEnough
06-20-10, 10:00
I too am on a US Embassy visa, but I'm thinking about an SRRV once I no longer qualify for the current visa. I'm pretty sure that after age 60, the requirement drops to $10,000, which is pretty attractive to me.
GE

Red Kilt
06-20-10, 10:09
.................... Married men, of course, are advised to show up alone. Otherwise trouble might be brewing...........

Thaifun - your post #152 was excellent and very accurate. I have a middle-aged bachelor friend with plenty of cash who has just gone through the process, and he verifies your account, including the anecdotes about hot nurses and clerical assistants.

Your point about married men (quoted above) is clearly made in jest but it actually raises a relevant point especially if the wife is a filipina.
Being married to a filipina gives me a Spouse Visa which has all the same advantages as a special SSRV visa without the need to pay any money.
The process to get the Spouse Visa was also much simpler than I anticipated, because the BoI has really sorted out a lot of its red tape under Commissioner Libanan and it was a very straight forward process.
I raised this in case there are any guys out there with a pinay wife who are contemplating living here and may be under a misapprehension that they need to get an SSRV too.

Thaifun
06-20-10, 10:51
Thaifun - your post #152 was excellent and very accurate. I have a middle-aged bachelor friend with plenty of cash who has just gone through the process, and he verifies your account, including the anecdotes about hot nurses and clerical assistants.

Your point about married men (quoted above) is clearly made in jest but it actually raises a relevant point especially if the wife is a filipina.
Being married to a filipina gives me a Spouse Visa which has all the same advantages as a special SSRV visa without the need to pay any money.
The process to get the Spouse Visa was also much simpler than I anticipated, because the BoI has really sorted out a lot of its red tape under Commissioner Libanan and it was a very straight forward process.
I raised this in case there are any guys out there with a pinay wife who are contemplating living here and may be under a misapprehension that they need to get an SSRV too.

Thanks for the flowers!
Keep in mind that a pinay wife has literally free access to your cash and 50% is anyhow legally all hers.
Makes no sense to marry if you can afford the visa and keep your assets protected.

Sammon
06-20-10, 11:03
I have been curious about Philippines for some time but have been unable to get straight answers from most sources - probably because I cannot offer straight information to most people. I am an ex-felon in the US with an old felony record that I am concerned could interfere with any travel plans. I have read that travelers can stay in the RP for 21 days without a visa and can extend to 90 days with visa. Question 1: can I qualify for a visa? Question 2: What are my options? I have considered periodic flights to Guam or Taiwan to renew my passport stamp. Is this doable? What is the typical method for immigration for most expats in the RP, and more importantly, can an expat expect the same benefits?

I am also interested in sailing the Pacific and am curious if anyone is familiar with the port entry regulations in the PH. Thank you.
I have never heard of any criminal record checks done for visa on entry in any country unless your name is listed as wanted on the interpol. If you apply for a visa at the embassy it is possible that they check.
If you are thinking of immigrating to PHI you need to contact a local lawyer to weigh your options. Do not go by various advices from people.

Red Kilt
06-20-10, 14:51
Thanks for the flowers!
Keep in mind that a pinay wife has literally free access to your cash and 50% is anyhow legally all hers.
Makes no sense to marry if you can afford the visa and keep your assets protected.

Perchance you misunderstood my intent Thaifun.

I was NOT suggesting that a guy should marry INSTEAD of getting an SSRV.
Guys who want a long-stay visa and who are without a wife are far better following your suggestions to get a valid and legitimate SSRV
I was merely indicating that IF you already have a filipina wife or intend to acquire one any time soon then the Spouse Visa gives the same advantages without tying up 10,000, 20,000 or whatever USD in an SSRV.

This thread already canvassed the rather murky waters of the destination of your SSRV in the event of your inevitable demise, whether expected or unexpected.
Anyway - your essential main point about the route to follow to get a valid SSRV instead of going with some fixer was well-established and I support it.

Professor 1
06-20-10, 15:02
I have been curious about Philippines for some time but have been unable to get straight answers from most sources - probably because I cannot offer straight information to most people. I am an ex-felon in the US with an old felony record that I am concerned could interfere with any travel plans. I have read that travelers can stay in the RP for 21 days without a visa and can extend to 90 days with visa. Question 1: can I qualify for a visa? Question 2: What are my options? I have considered periodic flights to Guam or Taiwan to renew my passport stamp. Is this doable? What is the typical method for immigration for most expats in the RP, and more importantly, can an expat expect the same benefits?

I am also interested in sailing the Pacific and am curious if anyone is familiar with the port entry regulations in the PH. Thank you.

As far as I know, only the People's Republic of China and Australia inquire of criminal status for a tourist visa applicant, as both of these countries require visas pre-arrival. I am not aware of any "visa on arrival" countries that ask such question if you hold a U.S. or E.U. passport. If you plan anything further, you want to consult a local lawyer who handles immigration matters in the destination country. My advice is not to volunteer anything, but never provide false information. Providing false information on immigration forms can be a serious offense in some countries, like the U.S., and you may do time prior to the deportation.

Thaifun
06-20-10, 16:11
Perchance you misunderstood my intent Thaifun.

I was NOT suggesting that a guy should marry INSTEAD of getting an SSRV.
Guys who want a long-stay visa and who are without a wife are far better following your suggestions to get a valid and legitimate SSRV
I was merely indicating that IF you already have a filipina wife or intend to acquire one any time soon then the Spouse Visa gives the same advantages without tying up 10,000, 20,000 or whatever USD in an SSRV.

This thread already canvassed the rather murky waters of the destination of your SSRV in the event of your inevitable demise, whether expected or unexpected.
Anyway - your essential main point about the route to follow to get a valid SSRV instead of going with some fixer was well-established and I support it.


We agree, I just thought that some smart guy might think that the 20 or 50K in a RP bank are a riskier venture than being married locally. Thus my short hint. ;)

What did your friend have to say about the nurses? I almost felt like in a japanese movie but then the examination was done by a male doctor which spoiled all anticipation...

El Greco
06-20-10, 16:26
I have considered periodic flights to Guam or Taiwan to renew my passport stamp. Is this doable? .

I think Hong Kong or Bangkok might be a better and cheaper option. Check this out.

http://www.cebupacificair.com/

FireWalker
06-20-10, 21:34
t it actually raises a relevant point especially if the wife is a filipina.
Being married to a filipina gives me a Spouse Visa which has all the same advantages as a special SSRV visa without the need to pay any money.


That is not in reality true. It looks that way on paper, but. . .The special SSRV is like gold. There is unwritten protection with it. If you have the highest one, damn. Cops know what it is and you don't have some of the issues regular people have. Talk to someone who has it.

Fastpiston
07-01-10, 08:07
I think Hong Kong or Bangkok might be a better and cheaper option. Check this out.

http://www.cebupacificair.com/

Making a few points on what I have been reading:

Singapore and KL are also options from Clark using Tiger and Air Asia respectively. Cebu Pacific has an ongoing problem accepting foreign credit cards. Most other budget airlines do not have such a problem.

On taking a marriage visa, note that you will have to pay the Philippine residence exit tax every time you travel. That mounts up in cost. You do not need to pay that Philippine citizens exit tax if you have an annual tourist visa or a retirement visa. If you have a 59 day visitors visa and wish to extend it, the fees have gone up - it is now just about the same cost to fly to HKG, SIN or KUL and have a break.

Cheapy
07-01-10, 16:53
Miracle of miracles, last week I actually booked two flights on Cebu Pacific using US credit card. Tried booking Phillipines Airlines and the credit card did not work.

I was surprised, had not worked before.

Cheapy


Making a few points on what I have been reading:

Singapore and KL are also options from Clark using Tiger and Air Asia respectively. Cebu Pacific has an ongoing problem accepting foreign credit cards. Most other budget airlines do not have such a problem.

On taking a marriage visa, note that you will have to pay the Philippine residence exit tax every time you travel. That mounts up in cost. You do not need to pay that Philippine citizens exit tax if you have an annual tourist visa or a retirement visa. If you have a 59 day visitors visa and wish to extend it, the fees have gone up - it is now just about the same cost to fly to HKG, SIN or KUL and have a break.

Bumbo
07-14-10, 22:59
You can get an on-arrival visa good for 21 days. After that you can go to any Bureau of Immigration office (there are many around the Phils) and get an extension for 38 days without any checks on your record. No need to leave the Phils for that.

Any further extensions after the 59 days are now a bit more complicated.

The biggest problem might be the boxes you have to tick when you fill out the arrival card. I cannot remember whether it asks if you have ever been convicted for anything in another country or not. I don't think it does.I'm planning to stay in the Philippines for 6 Weeks to be with my Gf and daughter! If I read this post correctly upon arrival at the airport I can go to local Bureau of Immigration office in manila to extend my stay for additional 21 days that be 6 Weeks total, Instead of filing visa application and mail it to the Phillippines Embassy in LA California? What would be better?

John W Boy
07-27-10, 21:34
you're welcome. Look, Ii m traveling a lot and stayed in many different places. Never ever I saw such a good service and never ever such a welcoming office staff. In Thailand you're treated as a criminal suspect if not sub-human once you stand in front of immigration. And it is there that the tea money culture is ripe. I would not doubt it if posters could report similar stories from other places.

In other words, the offer made by this shadowy and recently signed up person is based on the assumption that interested parties know about such deals in other places and have zero experience with the SRRV office staff.

I have the visa. It took my 2 months because I was traveling and could not do it asap.

A reasonable schedule for you would be like that:

Prepare yourself with some cash on hand. You will need around 1500 US for fees (but only if you want to pay right away, no need for that though), have the police fee ready in small notes in Peso, bring around 3K Peso for medical bills and taxi. Go to the office, let them talk you through the process. If you're ok, immediately do the police check. It takes about 2 weeks to get the ok.

Importantly, make sure you go there at 9 sharp in the morning to avoid waiting in line. Take a number at the entrance even if the guy is not there or wait for him. Often he is not there. The first time I simply waited without the number. The staff was embarrassed and got me a low number then. The office is the Citibank tower right at the Ayala triangle. They ask for a piece of ID to enter and upstairs you will need your passport. So give them some other government issued ID as you want to avoid running up and down in the elevators.

If you feel confident about the police business, do the medical check right away. They pick you up at the place and you pay the taxi. Takes about 2 hrs. Then go back and get a letter explaining your need for a time deposit account with an approved bank. They have the list. Take the letter or if this takes too long go to the bank and open an account (I don't think I paid one single cent for that). Then report to the office which bank you decided on. They will fax the letter but later you need to bring the original from the office. The bank needs some photos, xeroxes your passport and also wants an address. The office needs around 12 photos. You might like to pay fees now or better postpone the 1400 US payment.

After two weeks you know about the police and medical reports. Medical takes 1 day, maybe 2 workdays. Now pay the fee in the office and transfer the money to the bank. Make sure the banks don't deduct transaction fees. But you never know. So bring some small US bills with you to cover small fees in cash there. They really want the 50K and not 49. 988 US. Open a savings account for your interested to be deposited into. It's free.

Submit your bank statement to the office together with passport. It takes another 10 working days (max. Mine took 7) for you visa to be issued and inserted. You can call in order to avoid unnecessary visits.

Then pick up you're visa and new ID card. The I'd card is free for the 1st year, thereafter 10 US per year. You might like to pay 20 US to get a 3 yr validity. In other words, for the next three years no contact with anyone!

You will need of course an address in RP to be registered. I gave that of a friend and it was no issue at all.

I m sure that a wife who is a RP citizen will be helpful as well as kids. I m a single bachelor. The nurses at the medical center were all over me and I had to protect my cell phone number like my life. Of course they know for sure all they needed to know: single, healthy, 45 magnum hidden behind the zipper.

So for those hopeless bachelors: You even might get married to a certified nurse 30 yrs younger than you while going through the process.

Also, make sure you had enough sex the night before. Some of the office ladies are smoking hot. It is difficult to move through the place with a hard-on. Trust me on this. In other words, if you just want to sit in an aircon place and watch some really good looking women. That office is the place to go. Free cold water etc is on offer and just lean back, relax, and enjoy the view. When I had to go there I never felt that I was wasting time during the wait. Married men, of course, are advised to show up alone. Otherwise trouble might be brewing.

As for the special offer. I think a special fuck off is due.Does anyone have information on getting an SSRV in Cebu?

Thaifun
08-01-10, 14:22
Does anyone have information on getting an SSRV in Cebu?
the office is in Manila. Get their phone number from the web and give them a call. Always try to get the info from the original source.

WestCoast1
08-01-10, 14:39
Making a few points on what I have been reading:

Singapore and KL are also options from Clark using Tiger and Air Asia respectively. Cebu Pacific has an ongoing problem accepting foreign credit cards. Most other budget airlines do not have such a problem.Regarding Cebu Pacific and Philippine Airlines credit card problems (and other problems with your credit card being used in-country). You can solve almost all of these problems by calling the card issuer (the bank that issued the card) FIRST (before making any reservations or traveling there), and tell them what countries you will be flying in (or thru) and what dates you will be flying CP. The customer service rep will remove the fraud-protections from your credit card for that timeframe and countries. Use the number on the back of the card. Works like a charm for me, and when I forget to do it, I pay the price.

Dameon
08-03-10, 21:06
Hello all,

Just wondering if any board members have run across a good retirement guide to the Phils? Covering real estate; condo tels, visa requirements, health care, banking, common scams, etc, an insider guide so to speak.

I have seen lots of info from various sources on the net covering the above topics, but not in an condensed user easy version.

Thanks,

Dameon

Stroker Ace88
08-06-10, 17:47
I have a question about the standard 21 day tourist visa everyone is issued on arrival, and the way to go about getting an extention to stay in the Philippines.

I have always kept my trips to the Philippines at or under the 21 day visa limit, or made a visa run to Thailand in the past to get an additional 21 day visa upon return to the Philippines.

I have took the time to RTFF, but I just want to ask a few question incase I missed something. First I plan on staying in the Philippines for around 60 days at one time. I also plan on doing alot of traveling to some of the outer islands and more remote places.

Where exactly can I obtain the visa extention? Is the visa extention only available at international airport point of entries, or can I get it at a government office somewhere? Can I pay a visa service to get the extention for me, and is this a good idea?

How much does the visa extention cost? Do I need to fill out additional forms or submit a valid reason for the extention? How many days does the visa extention grant me and is the additional days tagged on to the end of the original 21 day tourist visa or only valid from the day of the application for extention?

What if I have only been in the Philippines for 15 days, but since I plan to spend two weeks on some of the more remote islands, is it ok to apply for the extention even when the current tourist visa is still valid?

I just want to make sure and get advice from someone who has already gone through the visa renewal process before booking my flights.

Starchild2012
08-07-10, 06:38
I have a question about the standard 21 day tourist visa everyone is issued on arrival, and the way to go about getting an extention to stay in the Philippines.



Visa extension in PH is cool as long as you have the money to pay. When you arrive, the immigration officer will grant you 21 days stay for free with a smile on his face.

If he is generous, he can even put another 38 days for free in the passport at immigration desk itself, so that you won't have to make a trip to the immigration office after 21 days.

I got lucky in Manila airport couple of times, he asked if this my first trip, i said..no sir second as i like PH very much with a smile, i was there six months back...he knew it already as there was stamp on my passport...just making small talk :)

He said...he has put two months stamp for me...:D i just gave a big smile and thanked him. contrary to popular myth that immigration officers are stone cold..if you smile and make small talk you will be surprised how much they can do.

If you can manage to make immigration officer happy with small talk and how wonderful PH is in a five second time frame...i think you won't even have to make a trip to immigration for your 60 days trip...it will be good for 59 days...so just make your day adjustment to couple of days and you are done.

If you get unlucky....

You have to go to an immigration office in any major cities like Cebu, Manila, Davao or check out the list below for a cities where you can get it done or give the work to some travel agents who would do it for 300 to 500 pesos fee..

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=128&Itemid=72

Before 21 days expires....you have to make a trip to the immigration office, where they will give you additional 38 days....total 59 days for a fee of 3100 or it could be bit more..check it out

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=118&Itemid=43

Now you have 59 days of legal stay in PH...but you will be staying for 60 days...so for just one day extension you have to pay 4100 pesos for two months stays and there in after you have to extend your visa every two months.

As you can see its not a good idea...just adjust your travel for couple of days within 59 day and you will be good.


with this extension thing you can stay in PH for 24 months extending your visa every two months...you can get upto 16 months extension anywhere..for another eight months you need to go to manila and do some stuff...its easy..

Immigration is better in PH than any other place in Asia if one wants to stay longer...Only question is they suck dry tourist with there ever increasing visa extension fees :(

If your visa gets expired or you forgot to extend your visa for some reason etc...you have to pay 500 pesos now i think its 1000 for every month of overstay PLUS the usual extension fee..

what you read on net seems complicated, in actuality its much simpler than that...you won't have any issues....good luck

if you have any doubts or questions feel free to ask

Amavida
08-08-10, 14:29
I have a question about the standard 21 day tourist visa everyone is issued on arrival, and the way to go about getting an extention to stay in the Philippines.

...


Where exactly can I obtain the visa extention?

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=129&Itemid=73



Is the visa extention only available at international airport point of entries, or can I get it at a government office somewhere?

See above


Can I pay a visa service to get the extention for me, and is this a good idea?

Yes you can get a travel agent to do it for you but it is becoming increasingly difficult to find one.


How much does the visa extention cost?

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=282&Itemid=51


Do I need to fill out additional forms

Yes


or submit a valid reason for the extention?

No


How many days does the visa extention grant me and is the additional days tagged on to the end of the original 21 day tourist visa or only valid from the day of the application for extention?

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=282&Itemid=51


What if I have only been in the Philippines for 15 days, but since I plan to spend two weeks on some of the more remote islands, is it ok to apply for the extention even when the current tourist visa is still valid?

Yes


I just want to make sure and get advice from someone who has already gone through the visa renewal process before booking my flights.

Since January you will now have to pay for an ACR-i card

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=107&Itemid=61

You go to Immigration, wait in a long line to pay a fee, then you are directed to another even longer line to pay more fees. Forms must be filled out & you will need official xerox's of certain documents (xerox's are obtained in the building) & photographs for the card.

AV

Amavida
08-08-10, 15:41
Hello all, Just wondering if any board members have run across a good retirement guide to the Phils?

Covering real estate; condo tels,

Not foreign investment friendly, Rent don't buy, Rent don't buy, Rent don't buy, Rent don't buy, Rent don't buy, Rent don't buy, Rent don't buy


visa requirements,

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=25&Itemid=36


health care,

get insurance, the private sector health care is good, the public sector is third world


banking,

leave as much money as you can in offshore accounts, get a local bank for the small stuff. Metrobank (many branches), China Bank (friendly helpful but not many branches)


common scams,

you're a foreigner - EVERYBODY lies to you about EVERYTHING



I have seen lots of info from various sources on the net covering the above topics, but not in an condensed user easy version.

Thanks,

Dameon


AV

Manta Ray
08-09-10, 03:56
I've been here for almost one year and normally I have my office handle my tourist visa extension for me. However, they usually take more than a week to get the passport back. Therefore, this time I need to take care of it myself. So, have any of you lads recently gone yourself to the immigration office in Manila to extend your 59 day tourist visa? If so, can you give me a rough idea of what to expect in terms of what time to be there, how long it will take, and anything else in particular that I might need to know in order to make it go smoothly and quickly?

Also, if any of you know a reliable Makati-based tourist agency that handles tourist visa extensions in one or two days (for a fee of course), that would be very helpful.

Many thanks
Manta Ray

Dameon
08-09-10, 17:43
Thanks AV, appreciate it.

Starchild2012
08-10-10, 13:16
I've been here for almost one year and normally I have my office handle my tourist visa extension for me. However, they usually take more than a week to get the passport back. Therefore, this time I need to take care of it myself. So, have any of you lads recently gone yourself to the immigration office in Manila to extend your 59 day tourist visa? If so, can you give me a rough idea of what to expect in terms of what time to be there, how long it will take, and anything else in particular that I might need to know in order to make it go smoothly and quickly?

Also, if any of you know a reliable Makati-based tourist agency that handles tourist visa extensions in one or two days (for a fee of course), that would be very helpful.

Many thanks
Manta Ray

All tourist agencies charge around 500 to 700 fees in addition to the fees we pay to immigration..if you know the agency well and have been using them for sometime..they may go down to 300 to 400 pesos.

Go early in the morning around 9.30, the office opens at 10 i think, just ask for extension form at the counter where some women will be sitting just adjacent to a staircase...fill up the form...just enter the required info....its not important to be exact info...they dont even look at it :)....take xerox of the passport front and back plus the form ..there is a copier machine inside the office itself..near the entrance.

Give the form and passport to the numbered counter windows according to the info displayed on the electronic boards ...you will see bunch of people already in line ..not that hard...they will put some stamps on the form and put the amount to be paid....pay the amount in the next counter and they will give you a slip and ask you to come after one hour or depending upon the rush not more than an hour or two.

You can go out, relax, have coffee or jollibee :) and come back and show your slip ( do not loose it) and take your passport back with extension stamp...check the extension stamp before you leave..


Its very easy....I don't know why people demonise immigration in every country...they are only after your money ;) if you pay the money ..thats all...the service is smooth in Manila.

It will take not more than 3 hours from start to finish.

If you are coming from Ayala ave. Makati side..take LRT from EDSA and get down at Central Terminal Station..just walk underneath the bridge, and garden and you will see immigration office...its 10 minutes walk..ask around....if you decide to come in Taxi...back and forth it self it will be around 250 Pesos.

If you take the train..the whole trip will be less than 30 minutes..if you come by taxi..it will depend upon traffic etc.

Good Luck...try it once..just for experience sake :)

Bumbo
08-12-10, 02:16
I been reading the posts on Visa extension! I guess it's better to get extension at Immigration office in Manila VS mailing process to your local Philippine consulate office! So the extension cost about close to 3, 500P? At Manila immigration office! Lets see if I did by Mail which I did for standard 59 days visa

1. Consulate Fee- $30

2. Passport photos $10

3. Notary $10

4. UPS or Fed-ex With self addressed envelope $26 + Signature required $3. 50 (to ensure they received envelope) I used UPS

So the total cost $79. 50

So next time when I go to Philippines I will get extension at Immigration office in Manila to save me couple of bucks! If I made a mistake on my post please correct me! Thanks!

Econo Tech
08-13-10, 06:51
So next time when I go to Philippines I will get extension at Immigration office in Manila to save me couple of bucks! If I made a mistake on my post please correct me! Thanks!Just remember, the Immigration in Philippines has some strict dress codes. Those in shorts and sandal and singlets, sloppy dressing. You need to know it. Will be refused service.. No kidding.

(RANT MODE ON) PS: only if you are one of those who complain about the heat and choose to wallow around the town half naked. I seen a lot of guys who don't even bother to zip their pants or wear a belt, and think it is cool. (RANT MODE OFF)

Red Kilt
08-13-10, 10:42
I been reading the posts on Visa extension! I guess it's better to get extension at Immigration office in Manila VS mailing process to your local Philippine consulate office! So the extension cost about close to 3, 500P? At Manila immigration office! Lets see if I did by Mail which I did for standard 59 days visa

1. Consulate Fee- $30

2. Passport photos $10

3. Notary $10

4. UPS or Fed-ex With self addressed envelope $26 + Signature required $3. 50 (to ensure they received envelope) I used UPS

So the total cost $79. 50

So next time when I go to Philippines I will get extension at Immigration office in Manila to save me couple of bucks! If I made a mistake on my post please correct me! Thanks!

The $29.50 for FedEx is money well-spent just to avoid having to attend in person in Manila.

Factor in traffic, heat, lots of Pinoys in the area, standing in lines etc and it is much better to send it by courier.

JMHO.

Bumbo
08-14-10, 03:42
Just remember, the Immigration in Philippines has some strict dress codes. Those in shorts and sandal and singlets, sloppy dressing. You need to know it. Will be refused service.. No kidding.

(RANT MODE ON) PS: only if you are one of those who complain about the heat and choose to wallow around the town half naked. I seen a lot of guys who don't even bother to zip their pants or wear a belt, and think it is cool. (RANT MODE OFF)Yes I heard about it! That's why I will bring it my 1. Khaki pants and 1. short sleeve button shirt whatever you call it! lol!

Korkavado
08-19-10, 16:17
Don't know if this will help. But have been doing a little research.

Apparently you can get a 3 month visa in US before go, valid for entry and exit of 59 days. At Philippine consulate or embassy via mail or in person. For 30 bucks.

Links:
http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/index.php?page=consular-services-dc/faq-dc/#traveldocument

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/uploads/pdfs/Non_immigrant.pdf


I have a question about the standard 21 day tourist visa everyone is issued on arrival, and the way to go about getting an extention to stay in the Philippines.

I have always kept my trips to the Philippines at or under the 21 day visa limit, or made a visa run to Thailand in the past to get an additional 21 day visa upon return to the Philippines.

I have took the time to RTFF, but I just want to ask a few question incase I missed something. First I plan on staying in the Philippines for around 60 days at one time. I also plan on doing alot of traveling to some of the outer islands and more remote places.

Where exactly can I obtain the visa extention? Is the visa extention only available at international airport point of entries, or can I get it at a government office somewhere? Can I pay a visa service to get the extention for me, and is this a good idea?

How much does the visa extention cost? Do I need to fill out additional forms or submit a valid reason for the extention? How many days does the visa extention grant me and is the additional days tagged on to the end of the original 21 day tourist visa or only valid from the day of the application for extention?

What if I have only been in the Philippines for 15 days, but since I plan to spend two weeks on some of the more remote islands, is it ok to apply for the extention even when the current tourist visa is still valid?

I just want to make sure and get advice from someone who has already gone through the visa renewal process before booking my flights.

Starchild2012
08-20-10, 07:00
For those wanting to stay permanently in The Philippine's . There are various options. like...

[From courtesy : Amavida]


1) Get a regular tourist visa & keep getting extensions up to 12 months max.

More info >> http://www.immigration.gov.ph/

or

2) Get a special resident visa (retiring here). There are conditions.

More Info >> http://www.pra.gov.ph/

or

3) Start a business & employ 10 locals, stay as long as your money holds out Its called SVEG (Special Visa for Employment Generation).

More Info >> http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=469&Itemid=104

or

4) Marry a local, get a Balikbayan stamp in your passport entitling you to stay for up to 12 months at a time without further cost.

More info >> http://www.overseas-retirement-community.com/balikbayan-visa.htm

or

5) Overstay your tourist visa. Hope you don't get caught. Pay a lot of fines when you do leave. Hope you don't get blacklisted from re-entry.

>> More info >> Up to you :)

======================================

Select the visa option that suits your needs..some of the features of special retirement visa are as follows: more in depth info on FAQ page on the main site...

Q: WHAT IS THE AGE/DEPOSIT REQUIREMENT OF AN APPLICANT?
A: Retirement Option and their Required Time Deposit

1. With Pension 50 years. Old and above the required time deposit is US$10, 000.00 plus a monthly pension of US$800.00 for a single applicant and US$1,000.00 for couple

2. Without Pension

35 to 49 years old US$50, 000.00 time deposit
50 years old and above US$20, 000.00 time deposit
Former Filipino Citizens (at least 35 years old, regardless of the number of dependents US$1,500.00)
Ambassadors of foreign countries who served and retired in the Philippines, current and former staff members of international organizations including ADB (at least 50 years old) -US$1,500.00


Q: WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS UNDER THE PROGRAM?

A: Once you are an SRRV Visa holder, it opens the door to vast opportunities and benefits. These include:

1. Option to Retire Permanently

a. You may live, work and study in the Philippines

2. Multiple Entry Privileges

b. You may travel outside the Philippines and re-enter anytime

3. Exemptions from:

a. Income tax over your pension and annuities;

b. Exit and re-entry permits of the Bureau of Immigration;

c. Annual registration requirement of the Bureau of Immigration;

d. Customs Duties and Taxes with regard to the importation of household goods and

e. personal effects up to US$7,000.00;

f. Travel tax, if you stay in the Philippines is less than one year from the last entry date; and

g. I-Card

As an SRR Visa holder, the PRA can assist you in obtaining basic documents from other government agencies. These include, but are not limited to:

a. Alien Employment Permit

b. Driver's License

c. Tax Exemption/Extension Certificate



Q: WHEN CAN THE REQUIRED FOREIGN CURRENCY DEPOSIT BE CONVERTED INTO INVESTMENT?
A: After one (1) month from the date of the issuance of the SRR Visa.

Q: WHAT AREAS OF INVESTMENTS ARE AVAILABLE TO A RESIDENT RETIREE?
A: The areas of investment are the following:

Purchase of condominium unit/s;
Long term Lease of a house and lot, condominium or townhouse unit/s;
Construction of a residential unit on a leased parcel of land;
Purchase of Proprietary Membership/Golf shares in golf clubs;
For former Filipinos, purchase of a lot not exceeding 5,000 square meters in urban areas or three (3) hectares rural areas to be used for business or other purposes.

You see after you make the deposit, you can also use it to buy home and other things

============================

Good Luck

Manta Ray
08-20-10, 08:29
Also, if any of you know a reliable Makati-based tourist agency that handles tourist visa extensions in one or two days (for a fee of course), that would be very helpful.
Manta Ray

Thanks to the tip supplied by Red Kilt, I contacted Voyager Travel ( 2/F Fedman Suites Bldg, Salcedo, Legaspi Village, Makati) to take care of my tourist visa extension for me.

I brought in to them my passport, filled in the application form in their office, and then left them to it. They did not ask for any money in advance and told me that they would text me when I could collect my passport from them. Sure enough, they texted me two days later to tell me my passport was ready. They charged only 500 pesos as a service fee and handled everything very helpfully and efficiently.

Manta Ray

Starchild2012
09-07-10, 15:18
Good time coming to an end....

De Lima urges employees to clean up immigration bureau

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/breakingnews/nation/view/20100907-291021/De-Lima-urges-employees-to-clean-up-immigration-bureau

...its not clean up but putting p-noy people in immigration and extorting money...expect higher charges overall everywhere in immigration.

Marcello Libannan was the man i admired who cleaned up corruption in PH immigration now its back to old days

Amavida
09-07-10, 15:31
Thanks to the tip supplied by Red Kilt, I contacted Voyager Travel ( 2/F Fedman Suites Bldg, Salcedo, Legaspi Village, Makati) to take care of my tourist visa extension for me.

I brought in to them my passport, filled in the application form in their office, and then left them to it. They did not ask for any money in advance and told me that they would text me when I could collect my passport from them. Sure enough, they texted me two days later to tell me my passport was ready. They charged only 500 pesos as a service fee and handled everything very helpfully and efficiently.

Manta RayWow that's so cheap! I've never heard of an agent doing it for so little!!

AV

X Man
09-07-10, 17:04
In Cebu some expat recommended a place that could do it for 400. I never made it as the hotel staff at Holiday Plaza recommended an agent just a few meters away. They charged 500 and also provided the good service that MR describes below.

My experiences indicate that using a travel agent may cost you a bit more, but they more than make up for that in time saved -- visas, as well as airline travel of course.


Thanks to the tip supplied by Red Kilt, I contacted Voyager Travel ( 2/F Fedman Suites Bldg, Salcedo, Legaspi Village, Makati) to take care of my tourist visa extension for me.

I brought in to them my passport, filled in the application form in their office, and then left them to it. They did not ask for any money in advance and told me that they would text me when I could collect my passport from them. Sure enough, they texted me two days later to tell me my passport was ready. They charged only 500 pesos as a service fee and handled everything very helpfully and efficiently.

Manta Ray

TurdyCurdyOne
09-12-10, 20:31
Don't know if this will help. But have been doing a little research.

Apparently you can get a 3 month visa in US before go, valid for entry and exit of 59 days. At Philippine consulate or embassy via mail or in person. For 30 bucks.

Links:
http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/index.php?page=consular-services-dc/faq-dc/#traveldocument

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/uploads/pdfs/Non_immigrant.pdf

One of the problems with this is that you need to send them a copy of your air ticket or *confirmed itinerary*. That means that you must purchase a ticket prior to applying for the visa. Last time I emailed the embassy in Los Angeles they did not answer the emails and their phone system is all screwed up. If you buy a ticket and there is a problem with the visa, or they are late your are screwed with a ticket u cannnot use.

TurdyCurdyOne
09-12-10, 20:35
The $29.50 for FedEx is money well-spent just to avoid having to attend in person in Manila.

Factor in traffic, heat, lots of Pinoys in the area, standing in lines etc and it is much better to send it by courier.

JMHO.


As I said in post above, you have to send the consulate a copy of your ticket or "confirmed itinerary". They did not answer my emails and their phone system goes into a continuous loop with no way to leave a message for their recording. You gonna buy a ticket in advance and then hope they will not screw up and send you visa late or not at all? B.S. This country has more ways of extorting money from foreigners than any other place I know of.

Red Kilt
09-13-10, 03:52
As I said in post above, you have to send the consulate a copy of your ticket or "confirmed itinerary". They did not answer my emails and their phone system goes into a continuous loop with no way to leave a message for their recording. You gonna buy a ticket in advance and then hope they will not screw up and send you visa late or not at all? B.S. This country has more ways of extorting money from foreigners than any other place I know of.

I am talking about applying for a visa in Manila T-C-O. I have used such a system to get visas for my wife (to Australia) and for both of us for visas to UK and Mongolia.

I have never had a problem. If you do it early enough and for some reason the visa issue gets rejected or screwed up then you still have time to get a refund on your ticket anyway

Going Low
09-20-10, 06:54
For those wanting to stay permanently in The Philippine's . There are various options. like...

[From courtesy : Amavida]

1) Get a regular tourist visa & keep getting extensions up to 12 months max.

More info >> http://www.immigration.gov.ph/

or

2) Get a special resident visa (retiring here). There are conditions.

More Info >> http://www.pra.gov.ph/

or

3) Start a business & employ 10 locals, stay as long as your money holds out Its called SVEG (Special Visa for Employment Generation).

More Info >> http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=469&Itemid=104

or

4) Marry a local, get a Balikbayan stamp in your passport entitling you to stay for up to 12 months at a time without further cost.

More info >> http://www.overseas-retirement-community.com/balikbayan-visa.htm

or

5) Overstay your tourist visa. Hope you don't get caught. Pay a lot of fines when you do leave. Hope you don't get blacklisted from re-entry.

>> More info >> Up to you :)

======================================

Select the visa option that suits your needs..some of the features of special retirement visa are as follows: more in depth info on FAQ page on the main site...

[quote]Q: WHAT IS THE AGE/DEPOSIT REQUIREMENT OF AN APPLICANT?
A: Retirement Option and their Required Time Deposit

1. With Pension 50 years. Old and above the required time deposit is US$10, 000.00 plus a monthly pension of US$800.00 for a single applicant and US$1,000.00 for couple

2. Without Pension

35 to 49 years old US$50, 000.00 time deposit
50 years old and above US$20, 000.00 time deposit
Former Filipino Citizens (at least 35 years old, regardless of the number of dependents US$1,500.00)
Ambassadors of foreign countries who served and retired in the Philippines, current and former staff members of international organizations including ADB (at least 50 years old) -US$1,500.00


Q: WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS UNDER THE PROGRAM?

A: Once you are an SRRV Visa holder, it opens the door to vast opportunities and benefits. These include:

1. Option to Retire Permanently

a. You may live, work and study in the Philippines

2. Multiple Entry Privileges

b. You may travel outside the Philippines and re-enter anytime

3. Exemptions from:

a. Income tax over your pension and annuities;

b. Exit and re-entry permits of the Bureau of Immigration;

c. Annual registration requirement of the Bureau of Immigration;

d. Customs Duties and Taxes with regard to the importation of household goods and

e. personal effects up to US$7,000.00;

f. Travel tax, if you stay in the Philippines is less than one year from the last entry date; and

g. I-Card

As an SRR Visa holder, the PRA can assist you in obtaining basic documents from other government agencies. These include, but are not limited to:

a. Alien Employment Permit

b. Driver's License

c. Tax Exemption/Extension Certificate



Q: WHEN CAN THE REQUIRED FOREIGN CURRENCY DEPOSIT BE CONVERTED INTO INVESTMENT?
A: After one (1) month from the date of the issuance of the SRR Visa.

Q: WHAT AREAS OF INVESTMENTS ARE AVAILABLE TO A RESIDENT RETIREE?
A: The areas of investment are the following:

Purchase of condominium unit/s;
Long term Lease of a house and lot, condominium or townhouse unit/s;
Construction of a residential unit on a leased parcel of land;
Purchase of Proprietary Membership/Golf shares in golf clubs;
For former Filipinos, purchase of a lot not exceeding 5,000 square meters in urban areas or three (3) hectares rural areas to be used for business or other purposes.[quote]You see after you make the deposit, you can also use it to buy home and other things

Good LuckAnd because this is Philippines, you can also get any visa here without any single requirement. I'm married to a Filipina and moved few years ago, I got my permanent visa in two weeks with a little help of my brother-in-law which has connections in the immigrants.

Boricua
09-23-10, 00:30
I plan to move to the PI sometime next year and am not Filipino. I think that my best option will be to go the 59 day extension route. I live in the USA in an area where we have several Filipino companies that provide Balikbayan services. I have a number of items which I would like to ship to the PI using this service prior to my moving. I have a g/f in Pasay and figure I could consign these items to my g/f. Good or bad idea?

Tenchi
10-04-10, 19:51
I plan to move to the PI sometime next year and am not Filipino. I think that my best option will be to go the 59 day extension route. I live in the USA in an area where we have several Filipino companies that provide Balikbayan services. I have a number of items which I would like to ship to the PI using this service prior to my moving. I have a g/f in Pasay and figure I could consign these items to my g/f. Good or bad idea?

Depends if you trust her I suppose. Why not have it shipped so it arrives after you do? Unless is it important it be there before you are...

Boricua
10-05-10, 15:24
Depends if you trust her I suppose. Why not have it shipped so it arrives after you do? Unless is it important it be there before you are...That's a great idea! I could ship just before I depart so that I can be there when the boxes arrive.

Thanks!

Otohill
10-09-10, 07:28
Can anybody tell what happens if you stay longer than the visa allows?

My problem is that I am staying in Angles City rigth now, and just noticed that I can only stay 21 days without visa, and aparently not 28 days as I thought.

Do I get kicked out when going to the imigration office or just get I fine?

PS: I am from Denmark

Red Kilt
10-10-10, 04:29
Can anybody tell what happens if you stay longer than the visa allows?

My problem is that I am staying in Angles City rigth now, and just noticed that I can only stay 21 days without visa, and aparently not 28 days as I thought.

Do I get kicked out when going to the imigration office or just get I fine?

PS: I am from Denmark

Go to the Immig office asap and pay the extension plus fine.

The BoI is really cracking down hard on over-stayers now as they have found many students are overstaying on their student visas so everyone is getting caught up in it.

Being 7 days over your visa means it will be very risky to leave it until you get to the airport. If they are busy or you get a nasty officer they may delay you way beyond the departure time of your plane.

Buko Max
10-10-10, 23:53
Do I get kicked out when going to the imigration office or just get I fine?
All that will happen is you pay around 3000 php extension + 1000 php fine. Should take an extra 15 minutes processing time depending on how long the line is. Have friends that overstay every visit and have done it myself last year.

Otohill
10-11-10, 03:16
Thanks for the info.

Econo Tech
10-12-10, 04:23
All that will happen is you pay around 3000 php extension + 1000 php fine. Should take an extra 15 minutes processing time depending on how long the line is. Have friends that overstay every visit and have done it myself last year.Yah right. You ever heard of people who had 'little' rubber stamp marks and that can haunt you for the rest of the travel in Asia?

You can be barred. Deported. Even though you are leaving and what not, depending upon the immigration officers' mood. And they have every right. After all, overstaying is an OFFENCE anywhere in the world (as I know it.)

People get lucky, but the day you get screwed, you will not even be able to go to any asian country.. No comments

Go and get it.

Buko Max
10-12-10, 13:13
You can be barred. Deported. Even though you are leaving and what not, depending upon the immigration officers' mood. And they have every right. After all, overstaying is an OFFENCE anywhere in the world (as I know it.)Yes of course it is an OFFENSE but being the corrupted country it is, they realize it generates a huge source of extra income. Besides you are not going to win a 'little' rubber stamp for mistakenly overstaying for a few days!

Sammon
10-12-10, 13:43
Can anybody tell what happens if you stay longer than the visa allows?

My problem is that I am staying in Angles City rigth now, and just noticed that I can only stay 21 days without visa, and aparently not 28 days as I thought.

Do I get kicked out when going to the imigration office or just get I fine?

PS: I am from DenmarkContact a travel agent to see what can be done. Many a times they get the extension for a small fee.

Do not go to the airport without the extension.

Gallantnitez
10-15-10, 02:24
I read somewhere that occasionally arriving in the Philippines without an onward ticket can get you set right back on the plane. Anyone have experience with this? I have also read that some buses from Manila to Angeles City get robbed and it is a risky way to travel. I am debating the cost of a taxi or pickup service. What are my travel options; the best, safest, and most economical means of transport to AC from Manila? My arrival date will be between Nov 1st and Nov 10th.

Tenchi
10-15-10, 11:33
I read somewhere that occasionally arriving in the Philippines without an onward ticket can get you set right back on the plane. Anyone have experience with this? I have also read that some buses from Manila to Angeles City get robbed and it is a risky way to travel. I am debating the cost of a taxi or pickup service. What are my travel options; the best, safest, and most economical means of transport to AC from Manila? My arrival date will be between Nov 1st and Nov 10th.


Which buses, like Partas? I've regularly used them with no problems. Even at night they're insanely busy, always felt safe. Don't worry, just don't flash your iPod or whatever...

Rubberyman
10-16-10, 00:16
I read somewhere that occasionally arriving in the Philippines without an onward ticket can get you set right back on the plane. Anyone have experience with this?

You should check with the airline flying you into the Phils. You might find that they won't even let you on the plane to the Phils without an onward ticket. I have always been asked to show my onward tickets to the check in desk. However, your airlines might have a different policy. They would at least know if there is an official requirement. Similarly, your own government may have travellers' advice that will tell you.

eg. http://www.voyage.gc.ca/countries_pays/report_rapport-eng.asp?id=239000

Or look up the Phils embassy website for your country.

Or just risk it and let us know what happened. LOL.

Red Kilt
10-16-10, 05:16
.......... Don't worry, just don't flash your iPod or whatever...

Especially don't flash your whatever.
That will get you into deep trouble lol.

Bigdan
10-16-10, 10:47
I read somewhere that occasionally arriving in the Philippines without an onward ticket can get you set right back on the plane. Anyone have experience with this? I have also read that some buses from Manila to Angeles City get robbed and it is a risky way to travel. I am debating the cost of a taxi or pickup service. What are my travel options; the best, safest, and most economical means of transport to AC from Manila? My arrival date will be between Nov 1st and Nov 10th.

This happened to me in May Etihad airways wanted me to change the ticket as I had 2 days over the 21 days Visa free but at the end they told me to tell there has been a small mistake. I only needed to show my Passport on the way to the custums, but I checked if everything would be ok on the return so I applied for a Visa Extension Swagman do it for 3880 pesos Cash in advance;)

Gallantnitez
11-08-10, 12:38
Korean Air refused to give me a ticket until I presented proof of an onward ticket. Turns out The Philippines will fine them if anyone comes in without one. So I ran to the net kiosk in the airport, booked a Tiger Air flight from Clark to Singapore for $100. Problem was, Tiger Air does not issue tickets, only confirmation numbers, and the kiosk didn't have a printer. So Korean air had to do a bit of leg work to print out a confirmation page. In the end customs barely glanced thru the paperwork anyway, but had I not had an onward ticket of some sort I am sure I would have had a bit more trouble.

Philippines is awesome. Except Manila, what a slum. Pampanga is beautiful once I got used to the jeepney fumes. Love it her. My girl is AMAZING. I feel the fool to be on this site talking about just one girl but I am happy and she is all I want. So sue me LOL.

FreebieFan
11-09-10, 00:46
Korean Air refused to give me a ticket until I presented proof of an onward ticket. Turns out The Philippines will fine them if anyone comes in without one. So I ran to the net kiosk in the airport, booked a Tiger Air flight from Clark to Singapore for $100. Problem was, Tiger Air does not issue tickets, only confirmation numbers, and the kiosk didn't have a printer. So Korean air had to do a bit of leg work to print out a confirmation page. In the end customs barely glanced thru the paperwork anyway, but had I not had an onward ticket of some sort I am sure I would have had a bit more trouble.

Philippines is awesome. Except Manila, what a slum. Pampanga is beautiful once I got used to the jeepney fumes. Love it her. My girl is AMAZING. I feel the fool to be on this site talking about just one girl but I am happy and she is all I want. So sue me LOL.Inconsistencies abound. Ive been flying to Phils for over 20 years, at least 6 trips per years. I've been asked once about an onward ticket by a Customs lady. Anyways life is good when you are happy and hope your gal continues to surpise and amaze.

Gallantnitez
11-09-10, 23:36
Inconsistencies abound. Ive been flying to Phils for over 20 years, at least 6 trips per years. I've been asked once about an onward ticket by a Customs lady. Anyways life is good when you are happy and hope your gal continues to surpise and amaze.As I write this my gf, Catherine, is sleeping soundly next to me. Last night we attempted, for the second night in a row, to pop her cherry. She remain a virgin despite our best efforts. Making love to her, even without being able to enter completely, is the best sex I have ever had. She is truely amazing in bed. And to think I was worried that perhaps she would be conservative and reserved. Damn, if all Filipinas fuck like this then they are the worlds best kept secret. Life is good. Life is VERY good.

Back on topic, I am now debating whether to leave each 21 days or apply for a visa extension. As a website designer I have the unique benefit of living anywhere without affecting my income. The Philippines isn't just a vacation, I intend to stay.

But now I have to go. Catherine looks so damn sexy laying next to me I have to go ravage her some more. I think I'm the luckiest man alive. Sorry mongers, she's all mine.

FreebieFan
11-10-10, 05:30
As I write this my gf, Catherine, is sleeping soundly next to me. Last night we attempted, for the second night in a row, to pop her cherry. She remain a virgin despite our best efforts. Making love to her, even without being able to enter completely, is the best sex I have ever had. She is truely amazing in bed. And to think I was worried that perhaps she would be conservative and reserved. Damn, if all Filipinas fuck like this then they are the worlds best kept secret. Life is good. Life is VERY good.

Back on topic, I am now debating whether to leave each 21 days or apply for a visa extension. As a website designer I have the unique benefit of living anywhere without affecting my income. The Philippines isn't just a vacation, I intend to stay.

But now I have to go. Catherine looks so damn sexy laying next to me I have to go ravage her some more. I think I'm the luckiest man alive. Sorry mongers, she's all mine.don't worry SirGallant. We all have "ours". Too, so no need to worry about "yours". Although right now "yours" is singular and you're clearly enjoying that. Enjoy it for as long as you can. Its a great feeling.

Charlien
11-11-10, 16:52
I was in the Phils a while ago living in Davao where I am renting a small house. Anyway, I left the country with my gf for 10 days in Sep to visit Thailand. On checking in at BKK on our return I was asked for proof of my exit ticket from the Phils at the Cebu Pacific check-in desk. It was an e-ticket issued some months before and I didn't have it with me. Thankfully there is internet cafe on the right hand side in the corner where I was able to go and get a print out. However it was annoying since like others have reported I have never been asked for my onward ticket at either Manila or Cebu and I had been in a queue for some time before reaching the check-in. Lesson learnt though! I am returning from the UK to the Phils in a day or so and cannot wait to escape the foul weather here!

Escort Fan
11-16-10, 15:04
I'm thinking about buying a condo in Manila.

Anyone can recommand good real estate sites please?

As I'm afraid to be ripped off I'll take my time (I guess 3 to 6 months) to make a final decision. Pay the right price, buy in the right building without construction default problems etc.

On a side note is it easy to borrow money from local bank (BDO, HSBC anything) if you have a solid down payment.

Ie: if I buy a 3 millions pesos condo, I'd rather pay 1, 5 cash and borrow 1, 5 to be settled monthly over a period ranging from 18 months to 3 years max than shell out 3M cash right away.

As they would have a mortagage on the half paid condo it's not like they are taking any risks!

Tally Wacker
11-17-10, 01:38
No worries. Just make sure you tell us when your able to pop her cherry. If you cant find the words to express yourself then photos and or videos will be just fine. Lol. Can I ask how you met your girl? Are you working or living in Phil?


I feel the fool to be on this site talking about just one girl but I am happy and she is all I want. So sue me LOL.

Wicked Roger
11-17-10, 16:19
don't worry SirGallant. We all have "ours". Too, so no need to worry about "yours". Although right now "yours" is singular and you're clearly enjoying that. Enjoy it for as long as you can. Its a great feeling.

Evil Twin..am surprised by your kindness though I admit it is good whne you have a regular, good to be happy

However, Sir G...as you maybe departing and the lovely Catherine would be lonely and as I am in PI...maybe I can offer my kindness and look after her for you, keep her warm, snuggly and very much the virgin she sort of is....trust me on this, my evil twin would vouch for my chastity, honesty and virtue with girls like Catherine...:p: :eek:

A purely selfless and gentlemanly thought of course :)

FreebieFan
11-18-10, 14:13
Evil Twin..am surprised by your kindness though I admit it is good whne you have a regular, good to be happy

However, Sir G...as you maybe departing and the lovely Catherine would be lonely and as I am in PI...maybe I can offer my kindness and look after her for you, keep her warm, snuggly and very much the virgin she sort of is....trust me on this, my evil twin would vouch for my chastity, honesty and virtue with girls like Catherine...:p: :eek:

A purely selfless and gentlemanly thought of course :)Sir G. Ever heard the famous words "bola bola". WR graduated and them mastered in it LOL. He would be on her various dorsteps saying "can I come in " in nanoseconds.

Meanwhile, I myself would take her for drinks, take her back to my place, dress her in wondefully sheer slutwear, and therafter help assuage her loneliness. LOL

Matius
11-19-10, 05:47
I'm thinking about buying a condo in Manila.

Anyone can recommand good real estate sites please?

As I'm afraid to be ripped off I'll take my time (I guess 3 to 6 months) to make a final decision. Pay the right price, buy in the right building without construction default problems etc.

On a side note is it easy to borrow money from local bank (BDO, HSBC anything) if you have a solid down payment.

Ie: if I buy a 3 millions pesos condo, I'd rather pay 1, 5 cash and borrow 1, 5 to be settled monthly over a period ranging from 18 months to 3 years max than shell out 3M cash right away.

As they would have a mortagage on the half paid condo it's not like they are taking any risks!

Can't answer your base question on a good real estate site, as my experience has been that Philippines real estate sites are targetting foreigners with inflated prices. The best deals are negotiated one on one with friends of a friend.

The base question I have is why you want to buy a condo in the Philippines? Your re-sale market will be limited to another foreigner, you are tied into a condo management that no matter how good today, could change in the next week, and there is no such thing as quality workmanship here.

Thinking that it is better to own than pay rent to someone else, don't forget how valuable it is here to be able to escape from a bad situation. Once you are tied in financially, getting anything done, fixed or an accomodation becomes very difficult. Many here refuse to own anything they can't put on the back of a truck, place in a shipping container, or drive away with. Then for the amount you are suggesting, you could build a house outside of Manila..at least then you could control the roof, walls, and other infrastructure.

If you are dead set on owning a condo, suggest you find one you like, rent it for a year or two with an option to buy at a fixed price. Then if you are in love with it, you can always purchase. That would also give you time to learn about living here, settle your mind where the best place is to live and have a better understanding through discussion with other foreigners on market pricing.

If you don't live here already, can give you pages of things to watch out for in living accomodations then still fall more than 50% short in everything you should know. Base building codes don't exist here, so there is absolutely nothing in construction that you can depend on in meeting a standard. A few thousand peso will get any city engineer to sign off on a construction, in point of fact without a payment, he will never approve it no matter how good the construction. Just as a sample, I can virtually assure you these things will happen, your walls will crack, your plumbing and sewage will be defective at best ineffective, your electrical wiring will be not only be defective but dangerous and your air conditioning will have problems. The only good (by western standards) construction I know of has been done by Europeans who came from a construction background and managed every step of the construction process.

GoodEnough
11-19-10, 10:22
I don't own property here, and I never will, for all the reasons stated and many more. Of the few foreigners I know who do own property, each has supervised the construction himself, and gotten old in the process of watching out for substandard materials and practices, having the substandard stuff ripped out, starting again until it's done correctly and then moving on to the next area of substandard work and repeating the cycle. They've got great houses admittedly, but for what it cost them in time, effort and frustration, it can't possibly be worth it.

GE

Cunning Stunt
11-19-10, 16:47
Can't answer your base question on a good real estate site, as my experience has been that Philippines real estate sites are targetting foreigners with inflated prices. The best deals are negotiated one on one with friends of a friend.

The base question I have is why you want to buy a condo in the Philippines? Your re-sale market will be limited to another foreigner, you are tied into a condo management that no matter how good today, could change in the next week, and there is no such thing as quality workmanship here.


Do you own a condo in The Philippines? I think not.

I do and have encountered few problems.

I found a reputable company (DMCI, one of the major condo builders in the country), bought off plan in an up and coming area not far from Makati and the price was so good that I paid cash, which allowed another massive saving.

The majority of mid-price condo owners are either Filipinos or overseas Filipinos. Only about 5% of condos in my development are owned by non-Filipinos.

My condo is now worth about double what I originally paid for it. If I sold it, the buyer would probably be Filipino. Meanwhile I rent it out for 30T pesos a month to holidaymakers and visiting overseas Filipinos.

An excellent investment.

Gangles
11-19-10, 17:31
My very good, very long time friend lives with his filipina wife in a good, gated compound not far out of Manila.

While I was staying with him about 18 months ago, he asked me to come with him to look at another house in the same estate. Asking price 8 million.

We looked the place over, compared notes.

A week later he offered 5 million. The owner, a filipino, was aback.

A year later, my friend got it for 5 million. Spent about half a million to gut it, refurbish the interior, fix the roof and everything else.

Now it is worth 8 mill, or maybe 10 mill.

By the way, it also comes with a vacant lot next door, as part of the deal.

Not a bad investment.

But you need to know what you are doing.

G

FreebieFan
11-20-10, 03:52
I'm thinking about buying a condo in Manila.

Anyone can recommand good real estate sites please?

As I'm afraid to be ripped off I'll take my time (I guess 3 to 6 months) to make a final decision. Pay the right price, buy in the right building without construction default problems etc.

On a side note is it easy to borrow money from local bank (BDO, HSBC anything) if you have a solid down payment.

Ie: if I buy a 3 millions pesos condo, I'd rather pay 1, 5 cash and borrow 1, 5 to be settled monthly over a period ranging from 18 months to 3 years max than shell out 3M cash right away.

As they would have a mortagage on the half paid condo it's not like they are taking any risks!Firstly as a foreigner not all banks will loan to you. Never mind you have more assets than most locals its the fact that you are "foreign"'.

Second you would be mad to loan money in Phils, where the cost of loaning funds can easily be up to 15%.. much cheaper to take out a loan overseas. Many epxats who do take a loan take it with Hsbc or bpi in Hong Kong, as they are used to making loans for real estate in Phils

Gallantnitez
11-20-10, 04:17
Got my first visa extension in Angeles City. I chose to take a jeepney from SM Clark Friendship Jeepney Terminal for 20 pesos. Wasn't too hard to find the place. Yes, I remembered to wear pants and my gf wore a full outfit as well. I am shocked how ez and unharassed the process was:

1. Got photo copies of passport pic page and stamp page (obtained at the cafe next door for 20 pesos)

2. Filled out one page application asking basic info (name, address, length of stay)

3. Filed at window 1

4. Payed at window 2 (bill said 2030 pesos but the clerk charged 3030)

5. Sat and waited 10 minutes

6. Picked up extension at window 3

I have heard that it is not uncommon to be told to return later in the day to pick up extension. I guess I got lucky. They told me that for future extensions I will have to apply for an i card or whatever it is called. Hope that goes as smoothly.

Going Low
12-27-10, 08:04
I'm thinking about buying a condo in Manila.

Anyone can recommand good real estate sites please?

As I'm afraid to be ripped off I'll take my time (I guess 3 to 6 months) to make a final decision. Pay the right price, buy in the right building without construction default problems etc.

On a side note is it easy to borrow money from local bank (BDO, HSBC anything) if you have a solid down payment.

Ie: if I buy a 3 millions pesos condo, I'd rather pay 1, 5 cash and borrow 1, 5 to be settled monthly over a period ranging from 18 months to 3 years max than shell out 3M cash right away.

As they would have a mortagage on the half paid condo it's not like they are taking any risks! If you're looking for an investment, I suggest you buy from pre-selling, meaning the condo is ready to move in example 2014 and you only need to pay small monthly amortization. I bought just myself from pre-selling just across the street is airport Terminal 3 and on the same guarded area with the condo you can find a Resorts World Casino, Maxims 6-star hotel and many many more attactions. It will be built by 2015 and I'm paying only 10k php per month. Once built, the value of the condo is already a lot more.

You won't get loan from banks although you would have permanent residency.

The banks require that you have been already living here several years and that you really have a lot of assets.

Red Kilt
12-27-10, 09:39
If you're looking for an investment, I suggest you buy from pre-selling, meaning the condo is ready to move in example 2014 and you only need to pay small monthly amortization. I bought just myself from pre-selling just across the street is airport Terminal 3 and on the same guarded area with the condo you can find a Resorts World Casino, Maxims 6-star hotel and many many more attactions. It will be built by 2015 and I'm paying only 10k php per month. Once built, the value of the condo is already a lot more.

I bought a condo in Ortigas Center in 2006 and went through a lot of due diligence before I handed over the cash. I decided to buy an older condo because I was not comfortable with buying "off the plan".

There are a few risks with this strategy:

1. A concern with buying off the plan is that often the prices of the units DROP once they have been built rather than INCREASE as you assume it will. This occurs because many of the units are already allocated to the sub-contractors as part payment for their services (plumbers, suppliers of doors, electrical fittings etc) and when the building is completed they try to shift their units by flogging them at bargain prices that are much lower than the prices that unwary buyers may have already paid. I discovered this when I looked at a plan for a new building and noticed so many prime units were already marked as "sold". When I told the realtor that I was interested in a particular unit only but that was already sold she quickly got back to me to tell me that it "wasn't really sold and if I was interested I could have it".

2. Sometimes there are major delays / problems with the builder and there was a case recently (in Ortigas) where the builder got into trouble and no construction continued on the condo for around 10 years until another company took over. This should not be a problem if you go with a large trusted building enterprise as you have done.

3. Another concern is that it is not so easy to get problems rectified once you have paid for things "in advance". Again, a reputable builder should be reliable to fix your teething problems but they will prioritise for those who have not bought yet but are likely to buy if problems are repaired. You don't have a lot of leverage because you have already handed over a large slab of cash by 2015 and it is not easy to get your "refundable amount" in a reasonable time if you decide to pull out. There are penalties too if for whatever reason you want to pull out.

4. My other beef about the new style condos being built all over Manila is the ridiculous size of them. There are 3 bedroom condos being built covering areas that are under 80 to 100 sq m. The rooms have low ceilings and are broom-cupboard size. I think my 3 br condo is rather smallish and it is 185 sq m. But I paid far less than is being requested for places half the size.

I am just trying to be constructive here and pointing out "potential" pitfalls in this strategy. These may not necessarily happen if you follow the pre-buying strategy but remember. Things don't always follow logical paths in the Philippines. We assume prices will appreciate over time, but it may not be the case with the enormous number of new condos being built. It can happen IF you are in a highly desirable area.

The position opposite NAIA 3 seems promising, but you might need double-glazed windows to keep out the noise from the airport and also the 24 hour entertainment venues and parking places that are all around that development. If you are buying it for investment then this latter concern will not trouble you.

Fast Buck Artist
12-29-10, 22:27
1. A concern with buying off the plan is that often the prices of the units DROP once they have been built rather than INCREASE as you assume it will.

Yes, also you might want to check out the sheer number of new residential buildings opening doors this year and next year. No less than 12 towers with 40+ floors each in metro manila. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_buildings_in_the_Philippines#Under_Construction

Supply is coming aplenty, how about demand? These are not residences a working class flip can afford.


4. My other beef about the new style condos being built all over Manila is the ridiculous size of them. There are 3 bedroom condos being built covering areas that are under 80 to 100 sq m. The rooms have low ceilings and are broom-cupboard size.

Yes, these new condos are built for midgets apparently. I walked into one and found a chandelier at the height of my mouth, a kitchen cupboard at the height of my chest and I could touch the ceiling just raising my hand, and no, I am not Shaquille O'Neal

Econo Tech
12-30-10, 04:28
Supply is coming aplenty, how about demand? These are not residences a working class flip can afford.Well, these are mainly targetted at the FilAms and such and, as I experienced while trying to negotiate with a property agent for Eton, a few years ago, when she kept pushing me a 100K US$ apartment, and I kept insisting on the 60K US$ apartment, she couldn't take it anymore and let a standard Filipino curse : "you don't deserve to buy an apartment and you don't deserve to buy ANY APARTMENT YOU CHEAPSKATE BASTARD".

I found from another agent doing the Beacon Makati, that the majority of clientele are Fil-Ams and expat pinoys, for whom, a 50K or 100K property is not much, considering the lease facility they are entitled to.

I lived through that, and lo and behold, now she is starting her sales talk in sweet words, as the market has made a lot of filipinos realise that the good times don't persist.

PS: I do know an investor who bought two units in St Francis, Shangri Lah. Try to find out the price of the Penthouse there and tell me if that is real or really real.

http://manilacondo.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/manila-condo-for-sale-ortigas-st-francis-tower-2br-115sqm-14m-shangri-la-hotel-residences/

Lord Balut
12-30-10, 21:31
PS: I do know an investor who bought two units in St Francis, Shangri Lah. Try to find out the price of the Penthouse there and tell me if that is real or really real.Not sure if you meant that as an actual question. In case you did:

I got an official quote regarding the Shangri-La St. Francis penthouse units in early / mid 2008 at least a year before completion and looked up the table. The 4 Grand Penthouse units in Tower 1 (there are 4 in each tower) were priced between a hair under PHP 85M for the smallest (547 sqm) and a little over 99M for the largest unit (640 sqm).

The various payment options included a 10% discount if you pay everything at once, a discount that seemed to be further negotiable while probing with the Shang property agent. The guy back then told me that he just sold one of the penthouses 'last week', but interestingly he didn't point out any of the units as unavailable.

I don't know if / how many were picked up by now but not long ago they still seemed to be actively marketed raising in me the suspicion that they were less in demand than the regular units in these towers. Prices should have been affected by the economic turmoil and maybe already by some recovery.

Member #4147
01-06-11, 17:56
Coming from USA and can stay 23 days. I have been told that for@3k I can get the visa extension on the spot. Anyone have any 1st hand experience w / this? Or could problems arise leaving US without said visa?

Thanks in advance

Red Kilt
01-07-11, 04:02
.
I don't know if / how many were picked up by now but not long ago they still seemed to be actively marketed raising in me the suspicion that they were less in demand than the regular units in these towers. Prices should have been affected by the economic turmoil and maybe already by some recovery.

Lord B: My condo is quite close to St Francis / SM Megamall / Podium etc.

I have looked at St Francis as an interesting new design / new condo development. Once again the Phil developers scrimp and take short cuts wherever they can. Regular rooms are minuscule in size for such an expensive and classy development. The penthouse prices are absurd. You can buy a full house and lot in a classy subdivision nearby (Valley Verde) for half that amount (in principle anyway, if you could own as foreigner, but you can always put it in your wife's name).
St Francis is a huge condo but the elevator access is going to be a major nuisance, as it is in most of these high-rise places. You wait sometimes 5 mins for an elevator.

My other major concern about all these developments is that NO attention is given to the dramatic increase in the traffic entering and leaving these places. St Francis is on Shangri-la Mall and right next to Shaw Boulevard / EDSA intersection (called the "Crossing") and it is a nightmare / bottleneck at the best of times since it is a key access to EDSA. There are no forward plans to alleviate this blockage, so it is going to be total grid-lock once St Francis becomes functional.

Wicked Roger
01-07-11, 04:54
Coming from USA and can stay 23 days. I have been told that for@3k I can get the visa extension on the spot. Anyone have any 1st hand experience w / this? Or could problems arise leaving US without said visa?

Thanks in advanceUP.

There is an office to the left of passport control. Visit it BEFORE you go to passport control and you can get the extension.

As for US no idea but surely they won't ask questions. If they do say you will extend on arrival.

Have fun with the spinners

Hairy Wonder
01-07-11, 05:26
UP.

I don't think the US immigration will be concerned with whether you have a visa for the Philippines or not. Many countries have certain lengths that Americans can stay without the need of a visa. The Philippine government is who will enforce any visa issues for your stay there. If you follow the recomendation of WR, you will probably be fine with the length of your stay. This is only my opinion, and I'm sure that others, with more experience in traveling from US to Phils would be able to give you more information on this.

HW

Thaifun
01-07-11, 07:43
I think this thread has been fucked over properly.

The relevant info on Residence Visas is buried somewhere in an avalanche of other stuff. I do see that there is a need for general visa advice. So maybe divide this thread into:

- the original thread.

- visa issues for tourists and short term visitors.

- business / investment.

- finally: fine dining? We know some love to talk about.

This way we would be back ON TOPIC.

Anyone agrees?

Red Kilt
01-07-11, 12:18
UP.

I don't think the US immigration will be concerned with whether you have a visa for the Philippines or not. Many countries have certain lengths that Americans can stay without the need of a visa. The Philippine government is who will enforce any visa issues for your stay there. If you follow the recomendation of WR, you will probably be fine with the length of your stay. This is only my opinion, and I'm sure that others, with more experience in traveling from US to Phils would be able to give you more information on this.

HWImmigration / Customs won't care on departure. It's the airline who will most likely check that you have a return ticket (someone will say they don't but many other guys have been caught out).

When I left Australia last month after a short holiday with a one-way ticket the airline desk staff wanted to see my Philippines visa (permanent resident) before they would book me on the flight.

Nobody anywhere will worry about your visa since they know it is "21-day visa on arrival" in the Phils.

Red Kilt
01-07-11, 12:26
I think this thread has been fucked over properly.

<SNIP>

This way we would be back ON TOPIC.

Anyone agrees? I agree Thaifun.

I was an offender running off giving info about residential living and condos because I never read the header properly.

We could have a split thread but.

If anyone is prepared to do a little bit of homework they can get virtually ALL the answers regarding visas from the BOI (Philippines) website at http://immigration.gov.ph/

Retirement Visa information is at http://www.pra.gov.ph/
This is a new updated website.

BTW - all those residents who have an ACR or ICR card MUST report to the nearest BOI office between January 3 and March 30 to do an Annual Report.
It requires a personal appearance; just rock up with your card and last year's receipt; pay 310 php and you are good to go for another year.
All resident "aliens" (non-Filipino citizens) must do it.

Gallantnitez
01-07-11, 12:31
Ok. Here is my tragic story.

Several years back I fell in love with a filipina cam girl, but I was serving a probation sentence in the US and wasnt able to come until 2 months ago. I have a pretty nasty criminal record but the last charges I got were false. I couldn't prove my innocence and nobody would believe me with my record so I was obliged to take a plea agreement. I decided it was time to get out of the US and to a place I figured I could escape more persecution. But I did realize that with my record I would not be able to apply for a visa even in the Philippines. So instead I figured I would stay 21+38 days and then leave on a 1 day jump to another country to renew my passport stamp. That was the plan anyway.

First 2 months went swimmingly. I am even more madly in love with my filipina then ever. I was a good boy and my only visit to Fields ave was to sky track to dance. I obeyed all laws and kept my nose clean. I knew I had to. I booked a flight to Singapore and all went well for my 1 day vacation. Boring as hell without my gf though. Upon return to Clark I was told by customs that I had been blacklisted and could not stay. I asked why and they suggest that maybe I had an open criminal case in the US and they thought I am a fugitive. Happily I do not, but maybe they think my probation sentence is still active. They werent very clear and just wanted to shuffle me off to be someone elses problem.

So they shipped me back to Singapore. Singapore customs didn't want me either since I was sent there on a blacklist. They forced me to buy a ticket on to Malasia. Malasia, unaware of my issues, granted me a brief stay while I gathered funds to return to the US. Now back in the US I am trying to sort out my options. I don't know if the Philippines was confused about my record and thought I had an open case. If I prove to them that I do not then will they remove the blacklist? I doubt it. My record is pretty bad. They probably think I am a serious risk. I am not a risk. Not any more. But who will listen? Who would believe?

So here I sit, broken hearted. Met my gf just long enough to fall completely, hopelessly in love and now we are dragged apart. I really love the Philippines, I even like the crazy food. Chicken head anyone. But I doubt I can ever return. Sometimes I think my life is some sort of Greek tragedy.

Note to others: If you have a criminal record don't think you can escape detection here by not applying for a visa. They do background checks eventually.

Punter 127
01-07-11, 14:39
I think this thread has been fucked over properly.

The relevant info on Residence Visas is buried somewhere in an avalanche of other stuff. I do see that there is a need for general visa advice. So maybe divide this thread into:

- the original thread.

- visa issues for tourists and short term visitors.

- business / investment.

- finally: fine dining? We know some love to talk about.

This way we would be back ON TOPIC.

Anyone agrees? Hi Thaifun, I was able to get this thread started by contacting Jackson and asking him to start it, you might try the same thing.

Good Luck

Tally Wacker
01-07-11, 18:38
Tragic indead. I remember reading your original posts. You must really like that filipina if this has been going on for several years. Have you met with an attorney like Sammons suggested in a previous post?

http://www.internationalsexguide.info/forum/showthread.php?2902-Philippine-Residency-and-or-Permanent-Visa&p=1034361&viewfull=1#post1034361


Ok. Here is my tragic story.

Now back in the US I am trying to sort out my options. I don't know if the Philippines was confused about my record and thought I had an open case. If I prove to them that I do not then will they remove the blacklist? I doubt it. My record is pretty bad. They probably think I am a serious risk. I am not a risk. Not any more. But who will listen? Who would believe?

So here I sit, broken hearted. Met my gf just long enough to fall completely, hopelessly in love and now we are dragged apart. I really love the Philippines, I even like the crazy food. Chicken head anyone. But I doubt I can ever return. Sometimes I think my life is some sort of Greek tragedy.

Note to others: If you have a criminal record don't think you can escape detection here by not applying for a visa. They do background checks eventually.

Sammon
01-07-11, 19:56
Ok. Here is my tragic story.

Several years back I fell in love with a filipina cam girl, but I was serving a probation sentence in the US and wasnt able to come until 2 months ago. I have a pretty nasty criminal record but the last charges I got were false. I couldn't prove my innocence and nobody would believe me with my record so I was obliged to take a plea agreement. I decided it was time to get out of the US and to a place I figured I could escape more persecution. But I did realize that with my record I would not be able to apply for a visa even in the Philippines. So instead I figured I would stay 21+38 days and then leave on a 1 day jump to another country to renew my passport stamp. That was the plan anyway.

First 2 months went swimmingly. I am even more madly in love with my filipina then ever. I was a good boy and my only visit to Fields ave was to sky track to dance. I obeyed all laws and kept my nose clean. I knew I had to. I booked a flight to Singapore and all went well for my 1 day vacation. Boring as hell without my gf though. Upon return to Clark I was told by customs that I had been blacklisted and could not stay. I asked why and they suggest that maybe I had an open criminal case in the US and they thought I am a fugitive. Happily I do not, but maybe they think my probation sentence is still active. They werent very clear and just wanted to shuffle me off to be someone elses problem.

So they shipped me back to Singapore. Singapore customs didn't want me either since I was sent there on a blacklist. They forced me to buy a ticket on to Malasia. Malasia, unaware of my issues, granted me a brief stay while I gathered funds to return to the US. Now back in the US I am trying to sort out my options. I don't know if the Philippines was confused about my record and thought I had an open case. If I prove to them that I do not then will they remove the blacklist? I doubt it. My record is pretty bad. They probably think I am a serious risk. I am not a risk. Not any more. But who will listen? Who would believe?

So here I sit, broken hearted. Met my gf just long enough to fall completely, hopelessly in love and now we are dragged apart. I really love the Philippines, I even like the crazy food. Chicken head anyone. But I doubt I can ever return. Sometimes I think my life is some sort of Greek tragedy.

Note to others: If you have a criminal record don't think you can escape detection here by not applying for a visa. They do background checks eventually. Things happen in life. I am not judging you. But as far as your girl is concerned you can get her on a fiance Visa. I do not know if your criminal record affects the fiance Visa.

Gallantnitez
01-08-11, 11:20
Tragic indead. I remember reading your original posts. You must really like that filipina if this has been going on for several years. Have you met with an attorney like Sammons suggested in a previous post?

http://www.internationalsexguide.info/forum/showthread.php?2902-Philippine-Residency-and-or-Permanent-Visa&p=1034361&viewfull=1#post1034361I am in the process of finding an attorney, first to dig into why I was blacklisted and after that perhaps to assist in getting her a visa. If she is willing to come. You know how important family is to filipinas. Only time will tell if she indeed loves me as much as I love her and is willing to make that sacrifice. I hate asking her to though. I wanted to move there and become a member of her family, not steal her away from her family.

It is a serious consideration for anyone trying to permanently immigrate to a country. You cannot know beyond a doubt that you will always be welcome. This isn't your home. You aren't a citizen. You are only a guest. Fall in love at your own peril. And if you do then enjoy each day for tomorrow you might be deported!

Slippery
04-18-11, 10:02
Things happen in life. I am not judging you. But as far as your girl is concerned you can get her on a fiance Visa. I do not know if your criminal record affects the fiance Visa.Those petitioning for fiancee visas with prior criminal records can be affected by both the International Marriage Brokers Regulation Act and the Adam Walsh Act. I would direct you to my website that explains the involvement of both acts but I don't think Jackson permits that.

Ratszo
08-26-11, 16:43
I am in the process of finding an attorney, first to dig into why I was blacklisted and after that perhaps to assist in getting her a visa. If she is willing to come. You know how important family is to filipinas. Only time will tell if she indeed loves me as much as I love her and is willing to make that sacrifice. I hate asking her to though. I wanted to move there and become a member of her family, not steal her away from her family.

It is a serious consideration for anyone trying to permanently immigrate to a country. You cannot know beyond a doubt that you will always be welcome. This isn't your home. You aren't a citizen. You are only a guest. Fall in love at your own peril. And if you do then enjoy each day for tomorrow you might be deported!When you first entered the country, the customs form asks if you have a criminal record. Lying on that would blackball you even if the conviction didn't.

Drug and sex offenders are blackballed from the get-go.

I got my visa extentions at a small office on Negros. At the time, it wasn't connected to a data base, doubt it is now. Only after 6 months did I need a police clearance certificate to leave the country.

I talked to some oldhands who would take a slow ferry to Malay every 5 months to maintain tourist visa status, customs are loose at ferry ports it seems.

Tough luck I'm sorry to say.

Buko Max
08-27-11, 10:26
When you first entered the country, the customs form asks if you have a criminal record. Lying on that would blackball you even if the conviction didn't.Don't remember anywhere on the declaration form it asks if you have a criminal record. :confused:

Ratszo
08-27-11, 14:48
Don't remember anywhere on the declaration form it asks if you have a criminal record. :confused:Yeah, I don't remember either. My wife, a Philipina, was quite sure it was on the form tho.

Here's an idea for Gallantnitez:

Thinking if you got a pardon, then apply for a legal name change, new passport, clean slate?

Maybe run that past a lawyer?

Screaming Beaver
08-28-11, 01:55
Those petitioning for fiancee visas with prior criminal records can be affected by both the International Marriage Brokers Regulation Act and the Adam Walsh Act. I would direct you to my website that explains the involvement of both acts but I don't think Jackson permits that.An Attorney constantly pimping for clients is probably not worth 2 pesos. Besides, you can fill out the paperwork on your own and bypass the blood suckers all together. The bigger problem you will have is when your newly imported beaver gets her green card. Of course, your friendly attorney who helped you import her to begin with will be happy to take more money from you to undo your first mistake. Best advise, don't go there.

Slippery
08-28-11, 13:55
An Attorney constantly pimping for clients is probably not worth 2 pesos. Besides, you can fill out the paperwork on your own and bypass the blood suckers all together. The bigger problem you will have is when your newly imported beaver gets her green card. Of course, your friendly attorney who helped you import her to begin with will be happy to take more money from you to undo your first mistake. Best advise, don't go there.Alot of people are too frigg'and stupid to complete the paperwork and provide the supplemental materials. Direct your remarks at them, not me. WTF do you do for a living? Tell us. I'll then be pleased to take some shots at you.

Ekspat
08-30-11, 09:37
Retirement Visa information is at.

http://www.pra.gov.ph/

This is a new updated website.I've got this visa recently and must say, this agency worked in my case absolutely fast and professional. Of course I had the necessary documents ready and then it was done in less than 3 weeks. Submitted the documents, medical check, opening bank account and police clearance wasn't an issue, done deal. Without any agent or lawyer or whatever.

Again, effective, fast, logical procedures, I had no problems at all.

Ed Rome
08-31-11, 22:44
I am an American citizen though I was not born in the USA but have been here since I was 3 years old. It was all I knew till I went to the Phillippines and OMG! I want to live there! I am 38 and wanted to know the requirements to live there and also to own property and business. Truth is I am a long way from retirement here in the USA but I would love to invest in a business and establish myself financially there. Lets be honest, the USA as we know it is falling apart. Not to mention all those LBFM's calling my name and I want to answer!