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Mojo Bandit
01-27-22, 23:30
For the purposes of talking about speaking Spanish and keeping the discussion out of the "Reports" threads.

Mojo Bandit
01-27-22, 23:41
ChuchoLoco ChuchoLoco is offline.

Senior Member.

Posts: 198.

More confusion in English.

Quote Originally Posted by JjBee62.

I am; you / we / they are; he / she / it is.

I / he / she / it was; you / they / we were.

I / you / he / she / they / it / we will be.

Etcetera.

Not only does English have conjugations, but the rules aren't consistent. Except for the irregular verbs, conjugation in Spanish is consistent.

For, four, fore.

Here, hear.

There, their, they're.

Hair, hare.

Etc.

All languages are difficult to learn. The hardest one is the one that you are trying to learn. When you speak your own language you don't stop to think what tense etc you just know what to say and you should do the same for Spanish. Just learn dialogue and how to say something in a particular situation. If you are over 45 or so, it will be difficult so make up cheat sheets of what you want to say and keep it simple. A good canslator can help but better to look up phrases.

Mojo Bandit
01-27-22, 23:43
I agree with JjBee 62 that there is conjugation in English but the conjugation of verbs in Spanish just seems so much more intense that English conjugation.

Mojo Bandit
01-27-22, 23:55
"I think with Spanish there is some frustration with for example having to learn all the conjugations because it is just counterintuitive for an English speaker to find out they have to learn so many different forms of what is one word in English."
To me, the problem is that because the US educational system sucks, native speakers of English don't know what a perfect tense is, for example, and when confronted with "conjugating verbs," they don't realize they have been doing it in English since they were three years old. When I was in school we learned all of that by the time we were in the 5th grade (about 11 years old) then in Middle School we moved on to syntax and diagraming sentences. Then the focus in High School was literature and composition. APA vs MLA and by the time I was out of High School I forgot all that stuff I learned in primary school.

Mojo Bandit
01-28-22, 00:28
JjBee62.

Senior Member.

Posts: 3865.

Quote Originally Posted by Huacho.

"I think with Spanish there is some frustration with for example having to learn all the conjugations because it is just counterintuitive for an English speaker to find out they have to learn so many different forms of what is one word in English. ".

'All verbs in English must also be conjugated. To me, the problem is that because the US educational system sucks, native speakers of English don't know what a perfect tense is, for example, and when confronted with "conjugating verbs," they don't realize they have been doing it in English since they were three years old. Example verb, to fuck. Obviously I fuck, you fuck, we fuck, they fuck. Simple indicative. English grammar is no longer being taught in Yew Ess schools because it's been so long since they taught it, the teachers don't know it. I have fucked a hooker. Past perfect. I fucked a hooker. Simple past tense. I fucked one or more hookers a lot over some period of time. Imperfect. Or in general if I say I fucked a lot of but hookers. How I feel about that and where I am going with that will determine preterite vs imperfecto. If I think of my past fucking as being over and done with, 'Cog con muchas putas. ' Pretrito because over and done with. But if I view my current situation as being more open ended and it's possible I might screw more hookers, I might go with 'Cog a con muchas putas,' meaning I fuck a lot of working girls in general, no real time frame.

JjBee62 :

I am; you / we / they are; he / she / it is.

I / he / she / it was; you / they / we were.

I / you / he / she / they / it / we will be.

Etcetera.

Not only does English have conjugations, but the rules aren't consistent. Except for the irregular verbs, conjugation in Spanish is consistent. ".

Mojo Bandit
01-28-22, 01:23
JjBee62 :

I am; you / we / they are; he / she / it is.

I / he / she / it was; you / they / we were.

I / you / he / she / they / it / we will be.

Etcetera.

Not only does English have conjugations, but the rules aren't consistent. Except for the irregular verbs, conjugation in Spanish is consistent. ".In Spanish the Conjugation is endless -- seemingly.

This is the verb "run" or "to run".

Indicative.

Present Preterite Imperfect Conditional Future.

Yo corro corrí corría correría correré.

Tú corres corriste corrías correrías correrás.

él / ella / Ud. Corre corrió corría correría correrá.

Nosotros corremos corrimos corríamos correríamos correremos.

Vosotros corréis corristeis corríais correríais correréis.

Ellos / ellas / Uds. Corren corrieron corrían correrían correráand.

And that is just the Indicitative, then there are tables of equal amounts of forms of the word for Subjunctive, Imperative, Progressive, Perfect (Perfect is the simplest becuase the word remains the same but somthign similar to an adverb is used).

As someone who is still slowly learning I offer this one tip to beginers. You quickly learn that Spanish as the informal and formal, where formal is used to talk to stangers. I just keep in mind as you can see in this chart that more times than not the conjugation of the verbs fore the formal version of "you" which is "usted" is the same as the third person conjugation for "he" or "she" - "el" or "ella".

Zeos1
01-28-22, 02:19
In Spanish the Conjugation is endless -- seemingly.

This is the verb "run" or "to run".

Indicative.

Present Preterite Imperfect Conditional Future.

Yo corro corr corra correra correr.

T corres corriste corras correras corrers.

l / ella / Ud. Corre corri corra correra correr.

Nosotros corremos corrimos corramos correramos correremos.

Vosotros corris corristeis corrais correrais correris.

Ellos / ellas / Uds. Corren corrieron corran correran correrand.

And that is just the Indicitative, then there are tables of equal amounts of forms of the word for Subjunctive, Imperative, Progressive, Perfect (Perfect is the simplest becuase the word remains the same but somthign similar to an adverb is used).

As someone who is still slowly learning I offer this one tip to beginers. You quickly learn that Spanish as the informal and formal, where formal is used to talk to stangers. I just keep in mind as you can see in this chart that more times than not the conjugation of the verbs fore the formal version of "you" which is "usted" is the same as the third person conjugation for "he" or "she" - "el" or "ella".Verb conjugation is about communicating what you are meaning to say. About some action or happening. Or state of being. And English has almost all of the ways of saying thing. And for people learning English it is no easier. It all seems natural when you grow up with it, but that is true of any language that is your native language.

Spanish is a lot more predictable than English. Once you learn the normal patterns for AR, er, and Ir verbs, and the patterns for 1st person, 2nd person, 3rd person you don't have to memorize any more as you can predict what it is, for regular verbs. Anyway, not saying it is easy, but a lot less random than English.

By the way, the "perfect" tenses are the same as in English where we use the verb "have" as a compound verb. And surprise of surprises, Spanish uses the verb haber in exactly the same way. And with fewer words than in English.

Huacho
01-28-22, 03:58
I can tell you right off the bat that the autocorrecting software, while fabulous of course and immune to criticism, will be a serious impediment to discussing how to learn Spanish on this thread. Just to give a famous example, ano versus año. I have no idea what the extremely fabulous software will do with this.

Villainy
01-28-22, 15:04
One phrase you will need to get used to in Spanish is: I have vs. I am (in English).

Here are just a few examples.

Spanish: Tengo 68 anos. (Literal: I have 68 years). English: I am 68 years old.

Spanish: Tengo hambre. (Literal: I have hunger). English: I am hungry.

Spanish: Tienes sed? (Literal: Do you have thirst?) English: Are you thirsty?

Spanish: Tiene miedo? (Literal: Does he have fear? English: Is he (she) afraid?

Spanish: Tengo sueno. (Literal: I have (a need for) sleep. English: I am sleepy.

Mojo Bandit
01-28-22, 15:29
I can tell you right off the bat that the autocorrecting software, while fabulous of course and immune to criticism, will be a serious impediment to discussing how to learn Spanish on this thread. Just to give a famous example, ano versus ao. I have no idea what the extremely fabulous software will do with this.I am not sure if it will work but I have had some luck getting around the software by not letting it publish by first draft. That is to say that when I make a post I immediately then click on "edit post" and then the changes are more likely to be kept and not autocorrected.

Huacho
01-28-22, 17:10
One phrase you will need to get used to in Spanish is: I have vs. I am (in English).

Here are just a few examples.

Spanish: Tengo 68 anos. (Literal: I have 68 years). English: I am 68 years old.No, that means you have 68 anuses, which I kind of doubt. That's why you need the tilde.

Ano = anus.

Año = year.

There is an episode of The Simpsons that involves this when Marge is a substitute Spanish teacher.

Nounce
01-28-22, 19:20
I agree with JjBee 62 that there is conjugation in English but the conjugation of verbs in Spanish just seems so much more intense that English conjugation.I agree with you. Spanish just seems to have more, and irrugular verbs too. Don't forget ser and estar, and also se.

Mojo Bandit
01-28-22, 23:32
No, that means you have 68 anuses, which I kind of doubt. That's why you need the tilde.

Ano = anus.

Ao = year.

There is an episode of The Simpsons that involves this when Marge is a substitute Spanish teacher.Yes but do you have the anñe and is pronounced "enye. " I have never been able to leard to use the tilde on my desktop keyboard? My phone is an android and I have the "GBoard" and I can change the language that I am typing with out changing the language of the phone's system. So I have English keyboard, Spanish keyboard, French keyboard. I have a little button that looks like a globe and I can just switch back and forth. It also helps of course because if I am parcticing Spanish in an app then it switches the auto correct on the phone to Spanish also.

Huacho
01-29-22, 01:16
Yes but do you have the ane and is pronounced "enye. " I have never been able to leard to use the tilde on my desktop keyboard? My phone is an android and I have the "GBoard" and I can change the language that I am typing with out changing the language of the phone's system. So I have English keyboard, Spanish keyboard, French keyboard. I have a little button that looks like a globe and I can just switch back and forth. It also helps of course because if I am parcticing Spanish in an app then it switches the auto correct on the phone to Spanish also.On your laptop, if you have a numeric keypad, it is Alt-164. The upside question mark is Alt-168. And similarly there are codes for the accented vowels and etc. But those two I know off the top of my head. Oh, and if you have to use a Spanish keyboard, the at is Alt-64.

Also, all compound nouns, meaning nouns made up of a verb and a noun, are masculine. El lavarropa, el secarropa, etc.

Steve 9696
01-29-22, 04:19
I speak moderate beginner Portugus and therefore can read most Spanish (like basics obviously) but now considering trip to Colombia thought I would add Spanish to the repertoire. I am not terribly worried about verb conjugations and all because we all tolerate foreigners who say things like "I go with you" rather than "I will go with you". We understand what they mean and that is really my only goal.

So about 4 lessons in, skipping liberally as they are so similar here is what I noticed so far (for those Spanish speakers wanting to pick up some Portuguese):

First. They are super similar. Lots of words are identical. And some are similar enough that you might accidentally use the wrong one (desculpa vs desculpe) but in balance I think the similarity is valuable for learning.

Two big pronunciation things. When you end in an O in Portuguese it's pronounced ooooh. And in Spanish is oh as in "oh my". And the Spanish say their Dsproperly. Like desculpe sounds pretty much as written. In Brazilian Portuguese (not mainland Portuguese) Ds sound like Js. So it's pronounced jesculpa. So actually its important u learn Portuguese aurally not visually cuz it doesnt look like it sounds primarily due to the two things above.

The o vs a thing when it's yourself vs another person is the same. Like in Spanish it's hablo and habla. And even though the word for speak is different in Porto (falar) it's falo and fala. The o for urself and the a when talking about the other person.

In both English and Spanish you reverse the word order for a question. Like Do you speak Spanish? Yes I do speak Spanish. Where the I or you goes in a different place relative to the verb when asking a question versus making a statement. This is not true in Portuguese. So whereas in Spanish you would say Are you hungry? In Portuguese you would say You are hungry? Only using intonation to indicate it's a question.

Anyhow that's what I learned in a half hour. Maybe it's helpful to some trying to learn both.

Villainy
01-29-22, 14:07
In both English and Spanish you reverse the word order for a question. Like Do you speak Spanish? Yes I do speak Spanish. Where the I or you goes in a different place relative to the verb when asking a question versus making a statement. This is not true in Portuguese. So whereas in Spanish you would say Are you hungry? In Portuguese you would say You are hungry? Only using intonation to indicate it's a question.

Anyhow that's what I learned in a half hour. Maybe it's helpful to some trying to learn both.That isn't quite right about Spanish. You have a number of question words to start a question. Como, que, donde, cuanto, cual, cuando etc.

But questions that don't start with a question word are a simple sentence and intonation defines whether it is a statement or a question.

For example.

Hablas español muy bien. With a questioning intonation it means "Do you speak Spanish very well?" With a regular intonation it means "You speak Spanish very well".

The key to these types of statement / questions is that in Spanish the "do" question word that we use in English, doesn't exist. Those types are formed as a straightforward sentence and intonation defines whether it.

Is a question or. Statement.

Nounce
01-29-22, 20:16
That isn't quite right about Spanish. ...Steve said he just started to learn Spanish. I know a little of both. Spanish is closer to Portuguese than English. Besides not having auxiliary verb do in both Portuguese and Spanish. Spanish starts a question with inverted question mark but Portuguese does not.

ChuchoLoco
01-29-22, 21:17
There are some good lessons on YouTube for beginners through intermediate. Take notes. Write down the phrases you want to use and practice them. Don't worry about all the tenses and conjugation. Just learn basic phrases for now if you are a beginner. You can also look for phrase books on Amazon and some are even geared towards specific countries.

Huacho
01-29-22, 22:09
This is in response to #16. I tried to reply with quote but was not able to defeat the autocorrect such that it made any sense. So I will try it this way. When words like como, donde, cuando and so forth are used in questions, they need the accent marks. I don't remember where I put my keys. Not a a question. No accent on donde. Where the fuck are my keys? Accent on the oh in donde. And so forth. If the sentence would have a question mark, these prepositions would need an accent mark. In Spanish, these words are called interrogatories.

Most Spanish speakers are going to put the adjective between hablar and espanyol. I have given up on defeating the software for the en with tilde. So it would be: Hablas bien el espanyol? With your voice going up at the end. Or if you are being complimented: Hablas bien el espanyol!

Note that it is 'EL' espanyol as a general rule (the direct article is required; many less educated speakers won't do this). An exception is when 'espanyol' directly follows certain verbs, including, importantly, 'hablar'; for example.

Hablo espanyol. Pero el espanyol que hablo es muy portenyo.

Mojo Bandit
01-30-22, 00:27
No puedo recordar dónde puse mis llaves. Donde estan mis llaves? In these cases I am copying and pasting from Google Translate but then after I post I am hitting "Edit Post" and re-pasting the same thing again

Mojo Bandit
01-30-22, 00:33
No puedo recordar dnde puse mis llaves. Donde estan mis llaves? In these cases I am copying and pasting from Google Translate but then after I post I am hitting "Edit Post" and re-pasting the same thing againEvery other time I would edit it would keep the tilde but in some cases it just completely drops the O with the tilde.

Triple Darknes
01-30-22, 00:35
There's a guy on youtube Biligue Blogs who said he because basically conversational in three months. He did it by surrounding himself in spanish watching only spanish TV and social media and listening to verb conjugations ten times in a row for ten hours straight.

I don't have the patience for that but that's also how they teach in the Army language school the teacher introduces their self and announces that that's the last english phrase that will be said in the class until graduation.

Hope this Helps.

Trip.

Huacho
01-30-22, 01:44
No puedo recordar dnde puse mis llaves. Donde estan mis llaves? In these cases I am copying and pasting from Google Translate but then after I post I am hitting "Edit Post" and re-pasting the same thing againYeah, but the one you put the accent on does NOT need one and the one you did not put an accent on does need one.

'No puedo recordar dnde puse mis llaves' does not need an accent on the word that means where.

'Donde estan mis llaves' Does need an accent on the word that means where (as well as in the conjugation of estar).

I am not going to spend time trying to defeat such clearly fabulous and superior software.

Huacho
01-30-22, 01:47
There's a guy on youtube Biligue Blogs who said he because basically conversational in three months. He did it by surrounding himself in spanish watching only spanish TV Been there, done that. It works. Even better is listening to the radio while you are driving. Those fuckers really talk fast. So just half listen, and it trains your ear. Listening to music in Spanish helps too. Shakira is from Barranquilla and speaks good clear Spanish. Hint: don't listen to Cristina Aguilar ja ja.

Huacho
01-30-22, 02:54
Early on, we learn that in general, nouns that end in oh are masculine and nouns that end in ay are feminine, with some exceptions. Let's look at the exceptions.

End in oh but are femenino: Very few. The most important one is la mano, the word for hand. In some countries the radio that you listen to is el radio and in others it is la radio; the argument for femenino is that it is actually an abbreviation of a feminine noun such as radiograma. More on that later.

End in ay but are masculine: Quite a few. Many of these end in them ay and have Greek roots. Problema, tema, dilema, etc. Others are not Greek but still end in ay. Día is the most common one there. Alma ends in them ay, but is feminine, but see below.

End in ay but begin with a stressed ay or aitch ay. These are feminine, but they will take the masculine article in the singular form, to make the language flow more smoothly. El agua, el hacha, el arma, el ala. This does not make them feminine. Try saying la agua and then el agua and you will see why they do this. In the plural form, you have the ess in between the two ay sounds so you don't need to do this. Las aguas, las hachas, las armas, las alas.

Doesn't end in ay or oh. I hate it when that happens. Here are some hints for other endings:

-cion, which will always have an accent on the oh in the singular but not the plural, is always femenino, no exceptions that I know of.

-ion, also always with an accent on the oh in the singular but the plural, is also femenino with a couple of exceptions I can't specifically remember.

-the, normally femenino. La mitad, la verdad, la pared. There are somewhat more exceptions here.

-e, a real crap shoot, must memorize, if you have to guess, guess femenino.

-are, mostly masculine, el comedor, el redentor. But also la flor so um memorize.

-ista, indicates a person's job or function. Will always end in ay but the article will vary with the actual person's gender. El dentista = a male dentist. La dentista = a female dentist. -or and -ora can work like this too. El director, a male director. La directora, a female director.

Some adjectives change meaning depending on whether the masculine or feminine article is used. These nouns will be femenino if la is used and masculino if el is used:

La papa without an accent mark = a potato. El papa without an accent mark = the fucking pope. El papa with an accent on the second ay = the father.

La cura = the cure. El cura = a priest. Now there are women priests so IDK WTF they do with that. Probably burn them at stake.

El Mar. = the sea in general, a body of salt water. La Mar. = my beloved sea, the sea nearby, and also the tide. Alta Mar. = high tide = femenino. El Mar. Caribe = the Caribbean sea = masculino.

Finally, compound nouns are always masculine. A compound noun is formed by a verb form combined with a noun. Washing machine. El lavarropa even though ropa is feminine. But another word for washing machine is la lavadora. See the difference? That's not a compound noun, so it is femenino since it ends in ay.

Huacho
01-30-22, 06:13
[Deleted by Admin]

EDITOR'S NOTE: This report was deleted because it contributed nothing of value and in fact constituted a complete waste of bandwidth.

The purpose of this Forum is to provide for the exchange if information between men on the subject of finding women for sex. Let's stick to the subject.

Mojo Bandit
01-31-22, 00:48
Just to be clear even though it says that I am the moderator of this blog, I am not the Administrator and I did not delete the last post by Huacho. (I point this out becuase in the past this has been a confusion in my other blog) I did not see the original post before it was deleted so I am not sure why it was deleted and have to go by what the Admin wrote.

This conversation was started in the Medellin Reports thread and was started based on the notion that guys who visit Colombia to seek women for sex but do not speak Spanish are not having as good as an experience as the guys who can speak Spanish. So I do think that the topic is related to guys looking fow women for sex because we are looking for sex with women in a Spanish Speaking country like Colombia.

In view of the administrators last post I wonder if when we talk about learning spanish we make the posts realte to talking to the prepagos in Colombia than maybe the Administrator will see the relationship.

Steve 9696
01-31-22, 02:53
Probably the most important words to learn are: blowjob without condom. In Portuguese this is blowjob sem camisa (the word blowjob is understood. And camisa means shirt. LOL.) How do I ask this in Spanish?

Also how to say "kissing with tongue".

BTW the generally most important words to learn in any language are "speak more slowly please".

Mr Enternational
01-31-22, 03:01
Probably the most important words to learn are: blowjob without condom. In Portuguese this is blowjob sem camisa (the word blowjob is understood. And camisa means shirt. LOL.).Except that is totally wrong. Blowjob is suck = chupa (shoo-pa). Condom is CAMISINHA (cam-ee-zeen-ya), not camisa (cam-ee-za). So you would want to say chupa sem camisinha. In Spanish it would be chupa sin preservativo or sin condon. Same as the lolipops.


Also how to say "kissing with tongue".Besando con lengua.


BTW the generally most important words to learn in any language are "speak more slowly please".It does not matter how slowly someone was speaking to me in Chinese. I do not know the language.

Triple Darknes
01-31-22, 03:52
Been there, done that. It works. Even better is listening to the radio while you are driving. Those fuckers really talk fast. So just half listen, and it trains your ear. Listening to music in Spanish helps too. Shakira is from Barranquilla and speaks good clear Spanish. Hint: don't listen to Cristina Aguilar ja ja.Yeah he mentioned surrounding yourself in Spanish especially listening to the news because the video shows what's going on and the hosts speak in the perfect accent of the country that you're going to.

I don't think I will learn Portuguese in a year but I will spring for a Airbnb with Netflix so that I can listen in Portuguese and read it in english.