Thread: Crime, Safety, and the Police

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  1. #2104

    Safer in Detroilet or Chicago?

    Before I get in a taxi, I ask the hotel staff if the taxi is safe or have the hotel call you a taxi. Kudo to Captain Solo for posting this alert.

    Also, migrants could easily wind up dead in Detroit or Chicago from a drive by shooting or dead from dating dudes in Los Angeles. One guy there is notorious for dating black male prostitutes who wind up dead afterwards. . . Sex and drug parties gone sour. This is likely what happened in Tijuana, tweekers on Cristal desperate for a fix and imagining that broke migrant kids could pay for their next hit of meth, then killing them when the money for drugs didn't show up.

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainSolo  [View Original Post]
    Gangs with ties to cartels and drugs sales lured the 3 migrant boys to a house in Tijuana with promise of sex and money. They then kidnapped, tortured and murdered 2 to extort money. The bodies were dumped near Calle Quintana Roo, near the Telefonica Gastro Park. If gangs even extort money from the poorest migrants, they will probably soon target gringos, whose families would pay hundreds thousands for their release. Gangs may just murder victims rather than risking being identified in prosecution..

  2. #2103
    Gangs with ties to cartels and drugs sales lured the 3 migrant boys to a house in Tijuana with promise of sex and money. They then kidnapped, tortured and murdered 2 to extort money. The bodies were dumped near Calle Quintana Roo, near the Telefonica Gastro Park. If gangs even extort money from the poorest migrants, they will probably soon target gringos, whose families would pay hundreds thousands for their release. Gangs may just murder victims rather than risking being identified in prosecution.

    To avoid the same horrible fate, the bros are urged to maintain low profiles in Mexico, don't flaunt their wealth, don't overpay and overtip girls and meseros, don't make themselves look like lucrative targets for kipnap and extortion, don't go places with unknown people, don't ride in unknown taxis, UBER is safer, be very careful where they go and whom they deal with.

    Noobs and visitors from out of town are encouraged to contact Hong Kong's VIP host and Cascada's concierge, Alberto Quinto, to get the best service and security.

    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.

    Mexico Tricked, abducted and killed: the last day of two child migrants in Mexico.

    The deaths show the vulnerability of migrants forced to 'remain in Mexico' under new US policy for asylum seekers.

    Ed Vulliamy in Tijuana.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...xico-us-asylum

    On a Saturday afternoon in December, three Honduran boys walked out through the gates of the blue stucco YMCA shelter for unaccompanied child migrants in Tijuana, and turned past the gas station next door on to Cuauhtémoc Boulevard for a walk.

    Their destination was a sports centre-turned-migrant camp to visit people they'the met travelling north with a caravan of other Central Americans.

    Two of them never returned: the bodies of Jasson Ricardo Acuńa Polanco and Jorge Alexander Ruiz Duban, 16 and 17, were found the following morning; three people were arrested for their murder.

    The boys were tricked, abducted, tortured and killed; the survivor escaped with wounds to his throat from attempted strangulation and remains acutely traumatised.

    The horrific murder brings into brutal focus the vulnerability of migrants forced to "remain in Mexico" under the new US policy for asylum seekers.

    On a recent visit to Tijuana, Unicef's deputy representative in Mexico, Pressia Arifin Cabo said that migrant children must be protected from danger – on both sides of the border. "Migration is not a crime, and many of these adolescents are travelling alone, unsure of what to do," she said.

    The Guardian has traced the Honduran boys' final days, on the basis of the surviving child's account – we'll call him Lázaro – as told to staff at the shelter and the Tijuana district attorney, José Alberto Álavarez.

    "They had been with us two or three weeks", said Uriel González, who runs four YMCA shelters for unaccompanied child migrants along the border. "They left the casa by themselves, and one of two women started talking to them".

    According to González, the woman lured them to a white-gated house near the city centre with the promise of sex and money. Eventually, "she took them to a house and they were not allowed to leave. That's when they realised they'the been kidnapped".

    According to Álvarez, the initial motive appears to have been theft, but when it became clear the boys didn't have any cash the kidnappers decided to extort money from their relatives captives – and then started to torture them.

    The Hondurans were tied to chairs undressed and tortured with scissors.

    Two of the boys were murdered – one choked on a stick, the other strangled – but somehow Lázaro escaped and found his way back to the shelter, González said.

    The bodies of Acuńa and Ruiz were dumped the same night near a school nearby.

    A woman who lives nearby recalled: "There was a commotion. People said: there are bodies over the road! I saw them covered with a blanket. The police arrived, lights and noise, and took them away".

    Officers later took a statement from Lázaro and then asked him to recreate the route of his abduction, said Álvarez. "And, unbelievably, there was the same girl, walking the same street, doing the same thing – two days later. She told us where the house was, and there we found one man who took us to the other guy. ".

    The woman and two men were arrested and charged with abduction and murder.

    Because the victims were from the migrant caravan, the killings have drawn rare attention in Tijuana – where such deaths usually fail to turn a head.

    Local human rights activists have linked the double murder to a growing hostility towards Central Americans that has grown in Tijuana since the migrant caravans first arrived last year.

    "It's hard not to think that a climate of xenophobia promoted by the state's own institutions is not a breeding ground for this type of action", said the president of the Baja California State Commission for Human Rights, Melba Adriana Olvera Rodríguez, citing what she called inflammatory language by municipal leaders.

    Prosecutor Álvarez insists the deaths reflect the spiraling violence which has afflicted Tijuana: 2,502 were killed in the city last year – a rate of 126 per 100,000 inhabitants.

    "These were small-time drug dealers working the street, themselves intoxicated. These terrible murders illustrate the social decomposition we see in Tijuana," he said.

    Both men arrested have records of drug dealing, and admitted low-level connections with cartels.

    Migrants flee violence only to find more in Tijuana – Mexico's murder capital.

    "At the root of this are drugs", says Álvarez, "but most of the murders now are by petty drug-dealers; people fighting for turf for the domestic market in methamphetamine.

    "This case has attracted attention because the victims were from the caravan. If they had not been, no one would know about this – they would probably be just two more murder victims in Tijuana. ".

    Weeks after the murders, the YMCA shelter is still in shock; most of the youngsters here remember the victims well.

    "They were the same as us, who came here hungry and thirsty," says one boy, José. "We came for lack of work and because gangs back home threaten you with death to get money even if it's just a few pennies. ".

    González fears for the safety of the surviving boy. "The kidnappers threatened to kill him if he spoke. He just wants to get the hell out of Mexico, but cannot until they have closed the case," he said.

    Local authorities say Lázaro will have to testify, but after that there is no guarantee the boy will be granted asylum in the US.

    The corner on Calle Quintana Roo where the bodies were dumped, two-and-a-half blocks away.

    On Monday 17 December, two Californian congress members, Nanette Barragáand and Jimmy Gómez, came to Tijuana, to join a protest against US authorities' refusal to allow asylum seekers to make their claim, as is their right under US and international law.

    After waiting all night at the crossing, they finally accompanied 20 migrants through, including 8 minors. There were supposed to have been nine – also on the list was Lázaro.

    "he should be in the United States now, processing his asylum claim" said González. "Instead he is here, traumatised, waiting for his chance to come, living this nightmare".

  3. #2102

    Foreign Owners. . . Meet the New Local Owners!

    It happens quite often in most third world countries. Foreigners invest capital and their lives into developing businesses, only to be robbed and lose them to locals.

    In the cases of Nikki's bar and the Strip club on Revo, both businesses just disappeared. Nobody took them over.

    Respectable business and government officials are always looking for opportunities to squeeze people for mordida. I am not surprised that government officials took large bribes from El Chapo an dother cartels.

    Knew a guy years ago who owned a Tijuana factory making cardboard boxes for TVs from Maquiladora plants. He said he was always getting visits from different Mexican government agencies for "inspections" and then having to pay "mordida". When he got fed up with the payoffs and some of the locals heard him yelling about it in his office, he got a call at lunch that he was about to be arrested and held til he paid off some other people. . . He left immediately for San Diego and abandoned the cardboard factory. Something similar probably went down here. . . The businesses now have a new local owner who is friends with the local power structure. I've run into guys thinking they will open a business locally. Unless you have the right connections, you may have difficulties, once a local figures out how to run your business for you. Then you are no longer needed.

  4. #2101

    Foreign Owners. . . Meet the New Local Owners!

    Knew a guy years ago who owned a Tijuana factory making cardboard boxes for TVs from Maquiladora plants. He said he was always getting visits from different Mexican government agencies for "inspections" and then having to pay "mordida". When he got fed up with the payoffs and some of the locals heard him yelling about it in his office, he got a call at lunch that he was about to be arrested and held til he paid off some other people. . . He left immediately for San Diego and abandoned the cardboard factory. Something similar probably went down here. . . The businesses now have a new local owner who is friends with the local power structure. I've run into guys thinking they will open a business locally. Unless you have the right connections, you may have difficulties, once a local figures out how to run your business for you. Then you are no longer needed.

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainSolo  [View Original Post]
    What happened to Backpage's owners in the US shook up a lot of people who involves in prostitution in different ways to make profit.

    The law in most states in Mexico make it illegal to profit from prostitutes. Guys who operate the web sites and man the phones to send girls to hotels for sex could be convicted if local governments decide to press the issue.

    So far Mexicans seem immune to prosecution, but a few of those prosecuted and convicted that I heard of, were all foreigners:

    1. Black guy who ran escort service in Playas and Rosaroto Beach.

    2. Larry, black BBQ chef in SD, owner of Nikky's bar on Tijuana's Calle 1, arrested brought to CDMX for prosecution for trafficking and prostitution, fate unknown.

    3. The Jewish Dad and son, owner of a strip club on Revo, arrested and prosecuted for trafficking bestiality etc.

  5. #2100

    Escorts pimping.

    What happened to Backpage's owners in the US shook up a lot of people who involves in prostitution in different ways to make profit.

    The law in most states in Mexico make it illegal to profit from prostitutes. Guys who operate the web sites and man the phones to send girls to hotels for sex could be convicted if local governments decide to press the issue.

    So far Mexicans seem immune to prosecution, but a few of those prosecuted and convicted that I heard of, were all foreigners:

    1. Black guy who ran escort service in Playas and Rosaroto Beach.

    2. Larry, black BBQ chef in SD, owner of Nikky's bar on Tijuana's Calle 1, arrested brought to CDMX for prosecution for trafficking and prostitution, fate unknown.

    3. The Jewish Dad and son, owner of a strip club on Revo, arrested and prosecuted for trafficking bestiality etc.

  6. #2099
    If the various police agencies work together than it could help improve the crime situation. The military already patrols the streets in the Zona so it is hard to see how that will help much in the Zona. But to have any serious impact the federal govt must first root out the police corruption. I will be convinced the police are serious when the drug dealers that sell in the open are gone. The police may see this as a opportunity to shake more people down so I use more caution.

    Quote Originally Posted by StRobert  [View Original Post]
    Link to article from "The San Diego Union Tribune" https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com...131-story.html.

  7. #2098
    Quote Originally Posted by GNRPorche  [View Original Post]
    ...and they jammed him with speaking to girl for sex...hey can and will arrest for doing this hobby in other areas if someone doesn't like you...
    They "jammed" him? Where do you come up with these terms? What does "jammed" mean? Sounds like something I do to a slice of toast. And no, they can't arrest you for soliciting prostitution. It is legal in Mexico. If you look scared and gullible enough, the policia may say it's illegal and threaten you with jail unless you pay a "fine. " But they can't follow through on that threat because it's not illegal.

  8. #2097
    Quote Originally Posted by Aviator400  [View Original Post]
    What "illegal hobby" are you referencing? If banging putas outside of the Zone was illegal, there would not be a thriving escort industry in Tijuana.
    Way more escorts in NYC and they charge three times more. Still illegal. Most posters here don't want to be arrested for prostitution. I just met a 20 year old kid who got falsely arrested by his hotel for not paying his last night, this after they stole his stuff from the safe, and they jammed him with speaking to girl for sex. He was over a mile from zona Norte. And he is gay. And the police stole his thousand dollar watch. They can and will arrest for doing this hobby in other areas if someone doesn't like you, or what you are doing, or sees a financial opportunity. The Mariot for example is for well to do types, not call girls.

  9. #2096

    As homicides spike, Mexican president announces 'special plan' for Tijuana

    Link to article from "The San Diego Union Tribune" https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com...131-story.html.

  10. #2095

    Illegal Hobby?

    Quote Originally Posted by GNRPorche  [View Original Post]
    I stayed at that Mariot in Tijuana once. You Do not want a girl who's in the business in it. I showed up in sneakers and t shirt felt out of place. Keep in mind, as far as I understand it, the only place that these woman are legal are the two streets on zona Norte. Once you bring your illegal hobby elsewhere, you are vulnerable to arrest.
    What "illegal hobby" are you referencing? If banging putas outside of the Zone was illegal, there would not be a thriving escort industry in Tijuana.

  11. #2094

    Military-police partnership targeting Tijuana's high homicide numbers rolls out

    Link to article from "The San Diego Union. Tribune" https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com...aSbKJSYO6V_tSQ.

  12. #2093
    Quote Originally Posted by GNRPorche  [View Original Post]
    I stayed at that Mariot in Tijuana once. You Do not want a girl who's in the business in it...the only place that these woman are legal are the two streets on zona Norte. Once you bring your illegal hobby elsewhere, you are vulnerable to arrest.
    Prostitution is legal in Mexico. You just can't openly engage in it out on the streets except in the zona de tolerancia. There's short term love motels everywhere, and puta bars spread throughout Tijuana outside the Zona like Amnesia, Deja Vu, La Razza, Cueva Peludo, La Botana, Bohemia, Marabu, Rokamar, Siete de Copas and a couple others I can't recall right now.

  13. #2092

    Mexico to send police and military force to murder hot spots (Tijuana)

    "Mexico City, Feb 6 (Reuters)- Mexico began beefing up law enforcement in its most violent districts this week, officials said on Wednesday, sending the first of 10,200 troops and police to reduce murder rates in 17 hot spots, in the first phase of a program it plans to expand. . .

    Homicides rose by one-third last year, breaking a record for the second consecutive year and underscoring the challenge facing Mexico's new president to rein in the violence that has spiraled over the last decade amid a military-led war on drug trafficking. The northern border city of Tijuana, which had one of the country's highest murder tallies in December with 202 deaths, began receiving new forces on Monday. Fellow USA Border cities of Ciudad Juarez, Reynosa and Nuevo Laredo are also slated for an influx of troops, along with tourist beach destination of Acapulco.

    The deployments are intended to be permanent, Durazo said."

    http://news.trust.org/item/20190206193919-0rrid

    Read recently that tourism is way down in Rosarita. . . American tourists are now afraid to go there and the Rosarita hotels and restaurants are hurting. Anyone confirm?

  14. #2091

    The alleys' policias community service.

    I was walking with my wingman along the alley Wed night, checking out the chicas. My wingman took out his huge iPhone, checking messages.

    2 cops were talking to a couple guys in front of hotel El Porton. The smiling pudgy guy warned my wingman that someone may snatch his phone. We thanked him and went on. We debated the wisdom of tipping them.

    On the way back, the 2 cops were still standing there by themselves. I gave the smiling, pudgy guy a $1, saying it's for coffee " para cafe. " My wingman also gave them money. They were beaming widely. Unlike the US, Tijuana policias make very little money, like $200 a month, and are always hungry. We decided to show our appreciation for the good policias' community service in propinas. Costed us little but looked like good diplomacy. Think of it as similar to Trump's foreign aids to poor Central America.

  15. #2090
    Quote Originally Posted by Travv  [View Original Post]
    "However well-intentioned, the surveillance tactics that have been adopted by hotel chains are part of a disturbing partnership between hospitality businesses, federal law enforcement, and rent-seeking nonprofits that increasingly seeks to track the movements and whereabouts of people, especially women, all over the country. Under pressure from the federal government and driven by persistent myths about the nature and prevalence of sex trafficking, hotel chains like Marriott have become the new frontiers of the surveillance state. Like the indiscriminate spying campaigns that grew out of the 9/11 attacks, it's an effort based on panic, profiling, and stereotypes, and it is nearly certain to ensnare more innocents than it helps. . . . "
    I stayed at that Mariot in Tijuana once. You Do not want a girl who's in the business in it. I showed up in sneakers and t shirt felt out of place. Keep in mind, as far as I understand it, the only place that these woman are legal are the two streets on zona Norte. Once you bring your illegal hobby elsewhere, you are vulnerable to arrest.

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