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Thread: Portuguese Words and Phrases

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  1. #1356
    Thanks.

    This is another instant report of distinction.

    If I could figure out how to link to that thread correctly haah.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    This is a Brazilian Portuguese language learning youtube channel that I enjoy watching.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5em2rhzvSjQ

  2. #1355
    This is a Brazilian Portuguese language learning youtube channel that I enjoy watching.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5em2rhzvSjQ
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Screenshot_20211029-103628_TubeMate.jpg‎  

  3. #1354
    More used is kkkkkkk.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    Totally agreee with everything you said. Except I have never known a Brazilian person to write jajajaja as people that speak Spanish do. It would even be pronounced as zsazsazsa as in Zsa Zsa Gabor. I have more commonly known them to write rsrs, which is short for riso or laughter.

  4. #1353

    Gringo and alemao

    An article published by O Globo in 2007 revealed the origin of Complexo do Alemão. After World War I, a Pole named Leonard Kaczmarkiewicz bought the land. It was not long before the place became known as Morro do Alemão German's Hill due to Kaczmarkiewicz's physical looks a person of stereotypical European fair complexion is informally called alemão, galego or russo in Brazilian Portuguese, while gringo only apply to non-Portuguese-speaking tourists; these terms can be offensive, jocose or intimate depending on context, but are generally impolitely neutral.

    Source: wiki on alemao.

  5. #1352

    Colloquial Brazilian Portuguese

    When I first started traveling to Brazil, I met a Brazilian woman living in the US who lent me the earlier edition of this book https://www.routledgetextbooks.com/t...ort_brazil.php.

    It contains conversations I used to practice with my Brazilian friends. Living among Brazilians in Brazil helps, but you obviously will not encounter any many situations as are covered in this book. I have often surprised Brazilians when a situation did come up by actively participating in the conversation instead of being uncomfortable because I did not know what was going on. Same goes for knowing popular Brazilian song lyrics. Those of you whom have been successful with women in your own country and language know where I am headed with this. There are few things sadder than walking by a Gringo-Tute bar and seeing two people with nothing to say sitting across from each other. Then you know it really is only about the money.

  6. #1351

    Jeitinho

    Means literally Little Way.

    Jeito means Way and we all know the suffix nho means Little, Small, Junior. Like Gatinho. Kitten.

    So, what Jeitinho means to a Brazilian when asked of someone is There must be a way or isn't there some way?

    This is usually accompanied by money (bribe).

    Stopped by the police. Jeitinho.

    Want to get into an exclusive club. Jeitinho.

    Want to do her up the butt. Jeitinho.

    Jeito. JAY-TOE.

    Jeitinho. JAY-CHEEN-YO.

  7. #1350

    Wow, so Pimsleur IS right!

    Good to know! I guess, I will use O Senhor more often then. And I was so confident that the garota set me straight, LOL.

  8. #1349

    The Lord

    Quote Originally Posted by Xpartan  [View Original Post]
    Now I don't speak Portuguese beyond the level of probably a 3-year old (if that), but here is something I'm sure of: people don't use "E O Senhor" in Brasil. I remember a girl I was riding on a bus with a few years back was dumbfounded to hear me say that to an older dude on the bus. She would actually accost the gentleman I was talking to and other people on the bus to ask for their opinions -- all of them agreed that "O Senhor" isn't used in Brazil unless in very formal settings, and they have never heard or used it themselves.
    Good article here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senhor

    If you have any exposure to religions in Brazil, you will hear O Senhor quite often. And, as Sperto mentioned in his post, it is used often when referring to an older person. My personal experience has been that it is used more often by 30 - 50 year old Brazilians when speaking with someone 65+. Therefore, a younger person may not have the same sentiment or upbringing. When I have used it, along with maybe a gentle touch, the older person lit up like a Christmas tree. In most cultures, a foreigner showing respect for the elderly is one way to ingratiate yourself with the locals. But, it is important to understand cultural differences. In Japan, I always asked my host for approval before giving my seat on the train to an elderly woman.

  9. #1348
    Quote Originally Posted by Xpartan  [View Original Post]
    Now I don't speak Portuguese beyond the level of probably a 3-year old (if that), but here is something I'm sure of: people don't use "E O Senhor" in Brasil. I remember a girl I was riding on a bus with a few years back was dumbfounded to hear me say that to an older dude on the bus. She would actually accost the gentleman I was talking to and other people on the bus to ask for their opinions -- all of them agreed that "O Senhor" isn't used in Brazil unless in very formal settings, and they have never heard or used it themselves.
    It's perfectly fine to use "o Senhor"/"a Senhora" when speaking to e.g older people on a bus, in the supermarket, on the street etc. It's a educated way of showing respect.

    In Nordeste it's not rare that children use "o Senhor"/"a Senhora" when speaking to their parents.

  10. #1347

    Pimsleur is great as long as you don't take it seriously

    Quote Originally Posted by Notsoyoung  [View Original Post]
    Leading up to my trip in March I am trying to learn some rudimentary Portuguese but Languages are not my strong suit.

    I am a bit confused about saying "and you ". I downloaded a script of the lessons from another source and this has it as e voc but that doesn't sound at all what they are saying.

    It sounds like "You Senhor" for a man and Ya Senhora for a Woman.

    They explain that in Portuguese the e is often lost in quick speech but I can't see where the "you" or "Ya" sound is coming from.

    I should probably just move on but things bug me when they don't make sense.

    I am not 100% if it is allowed or not but I could try and post a google drive or onedrive link with lesson 3 or just a snippet with the part in question.

    P.S. In writing this out in full I think I might have answered my own question. Would they be saying "e o Senhor" and "e a Senhora" and the e is is just lost in speech they explained. I can only assume therefore that the script I found is just someones's DIY attempt and the e voce inst correct for that part of the audio even thou e voce and be used for and you.

    Maybe I was better of without the script although it has helped a lot on some words.

    Any help greatly appreciated.
    Now I don't speak Portuguese beyond the level of probably a 3-year old (if that), but here is something I'm sure of: people don't use "E O Senhor" in Brasil. I remember a girl I was riding on a bus with a few years back was dumbfounded to hear me say that to an older dude on the bus. She would actually accost the gentleman I was talking to and other people on the bus to ask for their opinions -- all of them agreed that "O Senhor" isn't used in Brazil unless in very formal settings, and they have never heard or used it themselves.

  11. #1346

    Yes kkkkk

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordico  [View Original Post]
    You can also write kkkk.
    Quite right! Kkkkkk is more common. My Brasileira baby got engaged earlier this year and my Português is suffering!

  12. #1345
    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    I have more commonly known them to write rsrs, which is short for riso or laughter.
    You can also write kkkk.

  13. #1344
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve9696  [View Original Post]
    The whole Senor Senora thing is way over done on Pimsleur. Voce is used all the time. And when written it's "vc" if you want to be cool. Really improves your Portuguese and you learn a few written things like:

    Vc = voce

    Uau = wow

    Jajaja = hahaha
    Totally agreee with everything you said. Except I have never known a Brazilian person to write jajajaja as people that speak Spanish do. It would even be pronounced as zsazsazsa as in Zsa Zsa Gabor. I have more commonly known them to write rsrs, which is short for riso or laughter.

  14. #1343

    Layman's Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Notsoyoung  [View Original Post]
    Leading up to my trip in March I am trying to learn some rudimentary Portuguese but Languages are not my strong suit.

    I am a bit confused about saying "and you ". I downloaded a script of the lessons from another source and this has it as e voc but that doesn't sound at all what they are saying.

    It sounds like "You Senhor" for a man and Ya Senhora for a Woman.

    They explain that in Portuguese the e is often lost in quick speech but I can't see where the "you" or "Ya" sound is coming from.

    I should probably just move on but things bug me when they don't make sense.

    I am not 100% if it is allowed or not but I could try and post a google drive or onedrive link with lesson 3 or just a snippet with the part in question.

    P.S. In writing this out in full I think I might have answered my own question. Would they be saying "e o Senhor" and "e a Senhora" and the e is is just lost in speech they explained. I can only assume therefore that the script I found is just someones's DIY attempt and the e voce inst correct for that part of the audio even thou e voce and be used for and you.

    Maybe I was better of without the script although it has helped a lot on some words.

    Any help greatly appreciated.
    Some locals may chime in with more correct stuff but here is my take. I did Pimsleur about 60 lessons as I recall.

    First tip is don't worry too much about printed material. Learn everything by ear. Brazilian Portuguese rarely looks like it's spelled to a westerner. For example Obrigado. Once you see this written you are screwed. Because you will use western pronunciation. Like you will end with an O sound when it should end with an OO sound like zoo. And the R is between an R and L sound (more like Japanese than English). Not a hard R like English. Just LISTEN and repeat and you will have a MUCH better accent. I was consistently told by my Brazilian colleagues my accent was excellent for the small amount of study.

    The whole Senor Senora thing is way over done on Pimsleur. Voce is used all the time. And when written it's "vc" if you want to be cool. I highly recommend staying in touch with your favorite girl or girls by WhatsApp. Really improves your Portuguese and you learn a few written things like:

    Vc = voce

    Uau = wow

    Jajaja = hahaha

  15. #1342

    Help with "N U" Pimsleur 1 lesson 3

    Leading up to my trip in March I am trying to learn some rudimentary Portuguese but Languages are not my strong suit.

    I am a bit confused about saying "and you ". I downloaded a script of the lessons from another source and this has it as e você but that doesn't sound at all what they are saying.

    It sounds like "You Senhor" for a man and Ya Senhora for a Woman.

    They explain that in Portuguese the e is often lost in quick speech but I can't see where the "you" or "Ya" sound is coming from.

    I should probably just move on but things bug me when they don't make sense.

    I am not 100% if it is allowed or not but I could try and post a google drive or onedrive link with lesson 3 or just a snippet with the part in question.

    P.S. In writing this out in full I think I might have answered my own question. Would they be saying "e o Senhor" and "e a Senhora" and the e is is just lost in speech they explained. I can only assume therefore that the script I found is just someones's DIY attempt and the e voce inst correct for that part of the audio even thou e voce and be used for and you.

    Maybe I was better of without the script although it has helped a lot on some words.

    Any help greatly appreciated.

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