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  1. #12655
    Quote Originally Posted by StinkySquid  [View Original Post]
    picked her from photoacompanhantes, Giovana Paes. I tell you why I went with her, despite her asking for quite a hefty sum BRL 400 without anal...One thing that distracted me was that her hair was fake. I love long hair and I know most have the extensions. In her case I learned she lost most of her natural hair in some incident in a hospital almost a year earlier. This was sad to hear and a bit of a downer. Health is hot, lack of health, whatever the reason, psychological or somatic, is a bit of a downer.

    The PSE wasn't all that, and anyway her porn videos aren't really that professional hard core. The thing with her hair was a downer, didn't feel like pulling was an option nor really messing with it, I wish I had caught her earlier, the way she looked then.

    But now that I wanted to share a link with you I noticed she actually might have returned to a more active status. So, when I'm back in the area I might hit her up just to continue that little thing we had going for a minute there.

    Brazil calling: https://twitter.com/GiPaes2/status/1402167765692256259..
    I had a session with her in the fall of 2019. Back then she was staying at Edifício São Paulo Suite Service on Rua Major Diogo, 39. And I can confirm lots of working girls do work out of there as I visited two more girls in that building. This building does have airbnb listings so it may be a good place to stay. There is a front desk and a document is needed to get in. Can't remember how much she charged me back then but she was just so so. Since she is a porn atriz, I had high expectations but she was a letdown. Either she was having a bad day or she wasn't into me, there was no PSE or GFE. She didn't have any makeup on, which was fine by me as I usually prefer a natural look over heavy makeup (as most Brazilian women have). She was still very cute and attractive nonetheless. Didn't notice anything wrong with her hair so this was perhaps before when she lost her hair. I say without makeup she was a solid 7, an 8 with. Performance wise, I've had hundreds in the clinicas that were way better than her.

    Squid, not sure if she's still available as I only see her promoting her OF page on her twitter account now.

  2. #12654
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCane  [View Original Post]
    One always has to have his wits about him and be street smart in Rio (parts of Sampa too for that matter). But, you've got to consider that the economic damage from the pandemic has made everything much, much worse. People are suffering. People are desperate to survive. And desperate times make for desperate men. So, follow that MABs garota's example folks and keep watch over your backs!
    Even Elisa Sanches got robbed outside a shopping mall when a thief took her new, expensive phone few months ago.

    The poor people are hit hardest by the pandemic. Yesterday I sent some money to a NGO to help people in Heliopolis favela in Sao Paulo.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CBE25942-7709-4F46-A570-3EB761BEAFFF.jpg‎  

  3. #12653

    Perfect!

    Quote Originally Posted by WyattEarp  [View Original Post]
    Not to be glib, but Sao Paulo is what it is, nothing more, nothing less. Just a giant Latin American concrete jungle. Mongers rate SP highly for mongering, but not tourist amenities. But just like Rio is not Miami, Sao Paulo is not New York City.
    Could not have said it better myself! But, you do know that parts of New York City stink too right? Hahaha!

  4. #12652
    Quote Originally Posted by ShawMan74  [View Original Post]
    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much. This place reminds me too too too much of Buenos Aires (I reference you to my misadventures from 2014). Nothing but riddled with obstinance. Just weird, inverted, and difficult. In general the place smells really bad, it looks like an enormous slum, can't actually walk to anywhere (no matter how well you planned where you stay), uber takes extra long because after the first guy cancels (at the last minute) traffic will delay you past double the ETA anyway, nobody speaks anything but the local portuguese spoken here (which is some slick regional dialect that defies translation), everything is banker's hours (they roll the sidewalks up at 9), and everything is almost as expensive as in the usa. At least the people are fundamentally friendly, I will give them that (owner of the apartment left me half a case of liquor). But for anything other than brutal industrialism, I'd steer well clear of this place.

    Eff it. If this long-ass week is just going to be a long-ass museum and garden tour with a (secretly expensive) lunch special, than so be it. Tomorrow starts early and reports start tomorrow night.
    Perhaps you are in the wrong areas. Try spending time in Jardims, Itaim, Villa Nova Conceicao, Moema or Campo Belo (assuming you haven't). I've been walking around these areas. They can be very pleasant. No smells. Friendly people. Stop in at a padaria or lanchonette for a meal. The food is wholesome and cheap. I've mentioned a few decent, not overly expensive restaurants to visit in earlier posts. Last night I ate at Nagayama in Itaim. Great Japanese food. I didn't like São Paulo the first couple of times I visited. But give it a chance and explore. Learn some Portuguese. It's a really great city.

  5. #12651
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCane  [View Original Post]
    One always has to have his wits about him and be street smart in Rio (parts of Sampa too for that matter). But, you've got to consider that the economic damage from the pandemic has made everything much, much worse. People are suffering. People are desperate to survive. And desperate times make for desperate men. So, follow that MABs garota's example folks and keep watch over your backs!
    This can't be reiterated enough. Don't fall prey to thoughts like your a big guy no one is going to fuck with me. The bad people know foreigners carry around more cash than most Brazilians make in a month or two.

    It sounds like many mongers here start getting high on the monger lifestyle. Perhaps they have a few drinks in them. Listen to us. Uber even short distances! Don't look at your Google map and think "well, it's only a 10 minute walk."

  6. #12650
    Quote Originally Posted by ShawMan74  [View Original Post]
    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much. This place reminds me too too too much of Buenos Aires (I reference you to my misadventures from 2014). Nothing but riddled with obstinance. Just weird, inverted, and difficult. In general the place smells really bad, it looks like an enormous slum, can't actually walk to anywhere (no matter how well you planned where you stay), uber takes extra long because after the first guy cancels (at the last minute) traffic will delay you past double the ETA anyway, nobody speaks anything but the local portuguese spoken here (which is some slick regional dialect that defies translation), everything is banker's hours (they roll the sidewalks up at 9), and everything is almost as expensive as in the usa. At least the people are fundamentally friendly, I will give them that (owner of the apartment left me half a case of liquor). But for anything other than brutal industrialism, I'd steer well clear of this place.
    Not to be glib, but Sao Paulo is what it is, nothing more, nothing less. Just a giant Latina American concrete jungle. Mongers rate SP highly for mongering, but not tourist amenities. But just like Rio is not Miami, Sao Paulo is not New York City.

    Yes, it seems restaurants and bars are overpriced for the country, but you are likely staying where many of the top 10% of Brazil lives. Jardim Paulista is an affluent area with some nice commercial streets lined with cafes and such just as there are in BA. Malls also seem to be a bigger deal here than in the States.

    You mentioned that both SP and BA are "riddled with obstinance". I'm not exactly sure of the choice of words. Generally, Brazilians are more flexible and friendlier than Argentinians.

  7. #12649
    What are your guys favorite hotels? I've seen a few positive mentions of Bourbon Convention.

  8. #12648
    Go to rj.

    Beaches.

    You express my disdain of SP well.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShawMan74  [View Original Post]
    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much. This place reminds me too too too much of Buenos Aires (I reference you to my misadventures from 2014). Nothing but riddled with obstinance. Just weird, inverted, and difficult. In general the place smells really bad, it looks like an enormous slum, can't actually walk to anywhere (no matter how well you planned where you stay), uber takes extra long because after the first guy cancels (at the last minute) traffic will delay you past double the ETA anyway, nobody speaks anything but the local portuguese spoken here (which is some slick regional dialect that defies translation), everything is banker's hours (they roll the sidewalks up at 9), and everything is almost as expensive as in the usa. At least the people are fundamentally friendly, I will give them that (owner of the apartment left me half a case of liquor). But for anything other than brutal industrialism, I'd steer well clear of this place.

    Eff it. If this long-ass week is just going to be a long-ass museum and garden tour with a (secretly expensive) lunch special, than so be it. Tomorrow starts early and reports start tomorrow night.

  9. #12647

    What?

    Quote Originally Posted by ShawMan74  [View Original Post]
    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much. This place reminds me too too too much of Buenos Aires (I reference you to my misadventures from 2014). Nothing but riddled with obstinance. Just weird, inverted, and difficult. In general the place smells really bad, it looks like an enormous slum, can't actually walk to anywhere (no matter how well you planned where you stay), uber takes extra long because after the first guy cancels (at the last minute) traffic will delay you past double the ETA anyway, nobody speaks anything but the local portuguese spoken here (which is some slick regional dialect that defies translation), everything is banker's hours (they roll the sidewalks up at 9), and everything is almost as expensive as in the usa. At least the people are fundamentally friendly, I will give them that (owner of the apartment left me half a case of liquor). But for anything other than brutal industrialism, I'd steer well clear of this place.

    Eff it. If this long-ass week is just going to be a long-ass museum and garden tour with a (secretly expensive) lunch special, than so be it. Tomorrow starts early and reports start tomorrow night.
    I have been to Buenos Aires a few times, stayed in some nice areas, and I recall the core of BA being really nice actually. And although I would be the first to stand up and say that Copacabana smells bad, I experienced no bad smells anywhere in Sao Paulo that I went. I've stayed in Moema each time, and felt quite safe walking around, even at night. Giant slum? No clue what you're talking about. Sampa has good parts and bad parts just like any other big city. I stay my ass in the good parts! So should you. And instead of complaining about the language, remember it's their country and not yours! The people aren't there to accommodate you. So, find a way to communicate effectively so that you can roll hard and handle your business! Brazilian people generally speaking (no pun intended) are quite friendly. Work with them, and they will work with you. I mean, I could be wrong, but initially you sound like the kind of traveler where if everything isn't the way it is back home, or something close to it, then it sucks and is no good. Enjoy the place for what it is, and what it has to offer. And in Brazil, that includes some the absolute baddest tutes in the entire world! Believe this.

  10. #12646
    Quote Originally Posted by ShawMan74  [View Original Post]
    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much. This place reminds me too too too much of Buenos Aires (I reference you to my misadventures from 2014). Nothing but riddled with obstinance. Just weird, inverted, and difficult. In general the place smells really bad, it looks like an enormous slum, can't actually walk to anywhere (no matter how well you planned where you stay), uber takes extra long because after the first guy cancels (at the last minute) traffic will delay you past double the ETA anyway, nobody speaks anything but the local portuguese spoken here (which is some slick regional dialect that defies translation), everything is banker's hours (they roll the sidewalks up at 9), and everything is almost as expensive as in the usa. At least the people are fundamentally friendly, I will give them that (owner of the apartment left me half a case of liquor). But for anything other than brutal industrialism, I'd steer well clear of this place.

    Eff it. If this long-ass week is just going to be a long-ass museum and garden tour with a (secretly expensive) lunch special, than so be it. Tomorrow starts early and reports start tomorrow night.
    Are you sure your flight was not diverted?

  11. #12645

    Safety

    Quote Originally Posted by SinfullyKorean  [View Original Post]
    If you think SP is bad, wait til you check out Rio. I've never felt unsafe in SP. But everyone in Rio tells me to be careful, including the hotel receptionist and a MAB'S garota, who kept checking over her shoulder as we were walking to my hotel.
    One always has to have his wits about him and be street smart in Rio (parts of Sampa too for that matter). But, you've got to consider that the economic damage from the pandemic has made everything much, much worse. People are suffering. People are desperate to survive. And desperate times make for desperate men. So, follow that MABs garota's example folks and keep watch over your backs!

  12. #12644
    Quote Originally Posted by ShawMan74  [View Original Post]
    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much.
    LOL you're here to hobby, right? And the reason you're able to hobby here for so cheap is because of the income disparity. I've been in Moema the past 2 weeks (plus Rio), and I haven't noticed a bad smell. I think I noticed some bad smell passing a neighborhood while Ubering to Connection. But you're right. SP food is pretty expensive, relative to hotel and monger prices. A good meal typically costs $15-$20. I'm sure you can find better deals, but SP is a business district.

    The same goes for any SEA country. I've been to Thailand and Vietnam. Both are MUCH worse as far as odor and sanitation goes.

    Everything closing early is a major inconvenience. But that's due to covid restrictions. We're lucky to even be here at all considering how high Brazil's covid numbers are.

    I'm more of a go with the flow, see the silver lining type of guy by nature. But I've thoroughly enjoyed my 2 week stay in Brazil and plan on living here soon.

  13. #12643

    Nope.

    This is just my first day of a week in SP, and already I don't think I like it very much. This place reminds me too too too much of Buenos Aires (I reference you to my misadventures from 2014). Nothing but riddled with obstinance. Just weird, inverted, and difficult. In general the place smells really bad, it looks like an enormous slum, can't actually walk to anywhere (no matter how well you planned where you stay), uber takes extra long because after the first guy cancels (at the last minute) traffic will delay you past double the ETA anyway, nobody speaks anything but the local portuguese spoken here (which is some slick regional dialect that defies translation), everything is banker's hours (they roll the sidewalks up at 9), and everything is almost as expensive as in the usa. At least the people are fundamentally friendly, I will give them that (owner of the apartment left me half a case of liquor). But for anything other than brutal industrialism, I'd steer well clear of this place.

    Eff it. If this long-ass week is just going to be a long-ass museum and garden tour with a (secretly expensive) lunch special, than so be it. Tomorrow starts early and reports start tomorrow night.

  14. #12642
    Quote Originally Posted by WyattEarp  [View Original Post]
    You paint a nice picture of what to expect at venues and how the negotiations and sex will go down.
    Your experience with Gabriella is an interesting one that every monger should be prepared for.
    That's my only goal in writing that portion of the report. I knew people would say "you shouldn't have done that", etc. If it helps one other monger out of that situation, I've achieved my goal. I like what you said about making my intentions clear. I should've done that. I didn't think I was going to session that day, and I probably should've let her know, at the very least when she mentioned her price.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rextor  [View Original Post]
    I am putting together plans to come to Sao Paolo next month, with my novia from Colombia and I had a few questions.
    Take a look at Global's post: http://www.internationalsexguide.nl/...=1#post2570348.

    And WorldTravel's map: http://www.internationalsexguide.nl/...-Sao-Paulo-Map.

    They're complimentary posts. If you look up the clinicas, you'll usually be able to find a WhatsApp number listed on their sites. You can ask the managers directly. Same goes for boates. Girl on girl action here seems to be a lot more common. And my ISG buddy had 3 somes in Prime clinica for about R300. So I can't imagine BYOB (babe) will be rejected.

  15. #12641
    I am putting together plans to come to Sao Paolo next month, with my novia from Colombia and I had a few questions.

    1. Anyone else have experience / issues bringing a girl from Colombia to Brazil? I've read that a passport is not needed, which is great because the process to get a passport in Antioquia has been an absolute cluster fuck.

    2. I plan on bringing her to boates like Scandallo or Connection. I expect I won't have a problem getting in, but should I expect to pay extra to the garota to have a threesome? And would we have to rent a double occupancy room or soemthing? Are the garotas even open to going to the room with other girls?

    3. Anyone have any experience bringing another girl to a Clinica? Is that even a possibility? Or will the logistics not work out (aka room too small, outside girls not allowed to enter, etc)?

    Would love to get some perspecrives on this!

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