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Thread: Politics in the Dominican Republic

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  1. #79

    Republica Dominicana, Colombia and the United States of America

    Quote Originally Posted by Questner  [View Original Post]
    Just imagine some sort of Ministry of Tourism, or Ministry of War for that matter, starts making decisions on which bars may open in the US.

    They have to come clear on why and by which authority they have been shut down in the first place, and don't allow it to repeat again.

    Unlike Colombia, somehow Dominicans don't get the concept of the right to work, somehow they have some strange vision of protecting the vulnerable, somehow they find acceptable to harass their own women.
    I find your post curious. I wonder why you compare different countries (three actually) with three different systems and cultures? Do you actually expect everything to be uniform throughout the world?

    If you are a RD vet, then you know that the law here is what the controlling legal authority says it is at the time until the next controlling legal authority of greater influence says it is something different. Dominicans have a vote. But they don't have a say after the politicos are in office.

    Prostitution remains legal in RD. So whatever is going on in Sosua is not about the law. In Sosua from what I read (as I don't live there) it seems like the controlling legal authorities want it off the streets and in certain places. Even in Santo Domingo there are streets where you can find prostitutes and ones you cannot. It's really that basic. I'm reading the Sosua forum and laughing my ass off that these off-islanders don't understand that regular tourism trumps sex tourism by about 10 times when it comes to actual money spent.

    Lastly, if anyone finds another country that treats them better, I'm a big believer in going where you are treated best. For example, in my opinion there is no better place for making money for a person with no capital and no connections than the United States of America. Whereas there are many different countries throughout the world that have different lifestyles that are better than the United States of America. I find the climate and beaches of Republica Dominicana to be appealing. So much so, I've voted with my pesos and invested here. I have heard from several people who have relatives who live in Colombia that the infrastructure is much better. And it's much less expensive to live there. But if you are an extranjero it's unlikely you are going to get a loan to buy anything (especially real estate).

    What's the point of comparing countries?

  2. #78

    Pretty much hits every nail on the head.

    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    I walked into the Bravo on San Isidro and heard a sound that almost made me vomit on the spot. They were playing Boney James over the load speakers. It was an assault on my ear holes that finally brought to the forefront of this nagging feeling that I was having that something was wrong here in Republica Dominicana. And that is the Americanization of the country by multi-national businesses, growing american style consumerism and an advance of the worst that culture Americana has to offer.

    Now I don't know if this push is really a demand by Dominicans for everything american. My personal feeling is that the United States of America is way over played throughout the world. Too many believe the hype. The United States of America is devoid of culture, exports the worst of it's habits as culture, and is only good for doing one thing, making money. Now you can consider productivity a culture. But all that work that Americans put in don't do them any good unless they are owners of capital.

    Another thing that is really killing the appeal of Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este is the increasingly traffic nightmare that exists here. Others are up in here talking about people making a move out of Sosua to Santo Domingo. Bad move gentlemen (and I use that word loosely). I'm going north and east. In my opinion although the big cities offer the best entertainment lifestyle and activities for day to day life but they leave much to be desired (like the side effects from medicine or a hangover). In the small towns outside the big cities the chicas are hungry for excitement and pesos and they will take you dick to get the former and not demand much of the latter. Of course you have to have transportation to do that (uber does not cut it for this gentlemen no matter how hard the off-islanders want to ride the collective UBER dick up in here) and you have to speak Spanish. Period. If you don't want to put the work in to learn Spanish (and I understand why) let your pesos communicate and stay in the puta pueblos and big cities.
    Very well done post sir. It is always nice to read something well thought out from a thinking person who see's the world around us and can sense the sand shifting under one's feet. This post should be a must read for many of us. For me it hits a whole bunch of nail's right on the head.

    And unfortunately it describes a situation taking place all over the planet, including pretty much all of the 'recreation area's' many of us similar thinking folks rotate through.

    As the Commander mentions, the situation is changing. And in all to many places, all to rapidly. The New World Order is yesterday's Global Village on a potent mix of steroids and methamphetamine's. And it ain't going to stop soon, and it ain't going to end pretty I don't think.

    Folks who are getting a similar feeling need to re-evaluate their priorities and values, and expand their horizons and be willing to be creative and flexible.

    There are still very do-able options out there if one is willing to think outside of the box as they say. Last year I spent seven months having a look around East Africa and came home very impressed and will be returning again.

    Thanks for the post.

    Cheers.

  3. #77

    A straight WTF moment

    I walked into the Bravo on San Isidro and heard a sound that almost made me vomit on the spot. They were playing Boney James over the load speakers. It was an assault on my ear holes that finally brought to the forefront of this nagging feeling that I was having that something was wrong here in Republica Dominicana. And that is the Americanization of the country by multi-national businesses, growing american style consumerism and an advance of the worst that culture Americana has to offer.

    Now I don't know if this push is really a demand by Dominicans for everything american. My personal feeling is that the United States of America is way over played throughout the world. Too many believe the hype. The United States of America is devoid of culture, exports the worst of it's habits as culture, and is only good for doing one thing, making money. Now you can consider productivity a culture. But all that work that Americans put in don't do them any good unless they are owners of capital.

    Another thing that is really killing the appeal of Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este is the increasingly traffic nightmare that exists here. Others are up in here talking about people making a move out of Sosua to Santo Domingo. Bad move gentlemen (and I use that word loosely). I'm going north and east. In my opinion although the big cities offer the best entertainment lifestyle and activities for day to day life but they leave much to be desired (like the side effects from medicine or a hangover). In the small towns outside the big cities the chicas are hungry for excitement and pesos and they will take you dick to get the former and not demand much of the latter. Of course you have to have transportation to do that (uber does not cut it for this gentlemen no matter how hard the off-islanders want to ride the collective UBER dick up in here) and you have to speak Spanish. Period. If you don't want to put the work in to learn Spanish (and I understand why) let your pesos communicate and stay in the puta pueblos and big cities.

    There are many things about Republica Dominicana that I really enjoy. But maybe I just need a break, a change of location or some strange (just been dicking down my regular rotation lately). But what I don't need is more of the growing american cultural influence being thrown in my face. It's messing up an otherwise amazing experience of Republica Dominicana.

    Last piece of advice, if you are thinking of retiring here find your spot and reserve it. There are some great values, but I don't really see them being around 10 - 20 years out. If I was going to do it differently than I did, I'd buy a 1 bedroom 1.5 bath place where I wanted to be. It's like having your own private hotel room. Chicas who clean charge very reasonable prices. Just make sure you are in a building with 24 hour security and take a look the the quality of the cars parked below. I'd stay out of building where there are lots of units being rented by the a double be people. I've found at this point in my life, the only thing I'm willing to time share is pussy. When my time is up the next guy can have it until I return. LOL!

  4. #76

    Nearly half of Dominicans live below poverty line.

    For those interested in a Macro economic view of Republica Dominicana. This is one of the factors that make it a favored destination for sexual tourism.

    DR1 Daily News 5 March 2019.

    A study carried out by the Juan Bosch Foundation and the Development Cooperation Institute (ISCOS in Italian) has revealed that 47% of Dominicans are living below the poverty line. The study is called "The analysis of the announcements made by President Danilo Medina and a comparison to the real numbers in terms of employment, salaries, poverty and pensions", and is based on figures from the Central Bank. The report concluded that the, the average income per person / household was RD $4,644 in 2016.

    The report states that between 2014 and 2017 some 380,608 new jobs were created, of which 47% were in the informal sector and in 2017, some 121,066 new jobs were created of which 66.7% were informal, that is they are part of an economy that is neither taxed nor monitored by any form of government.

    Comparing the data provided by President Medina, in his state of the nation speech on 27 of February 2019, they said that 60% of people have an average income of RD $11,734 that is below the cost of the cheapest family basket which is RD $13,346.

    Matas Bosch Carcuro, Edgar Garca and Cabrera Airon Fernndez said that the majority of the Dominican working population earn much less than is needed to survive with 80% earning less than RD $17,000 that is much less than the average family basket estimated at RD $23,422. They criticized that President Danilo Medina had announced the public sector minimum wage would be doubled to RD $10,000 when the amount does not even cover the cheapest family basket.

    https://eldia.com.do/47-de-los-domin...ea-de-pobreza/

  5. #75

    Owner of Eros sent to pre-trial custody for pimping.

    In light of the discussion in the Santo Domingo Forum about the legality of activities related to prostitution in the Dominican Republic:

    National District prosecutors sent Jean Edouard Cornielle Darbouze to pre-trial custody at the Najayo Jail accusing him of pimping and money laundering. He is one of the owners of Eros Barbería why Spa, a business closed down after investigations into the death of Katherine Sanchez from a ninth floor where Cornielle also held an apartment in the same Malecon Center complex. The Oficina de Atencióand Permanente del Distrito Nacional had also ordered pre-trial measures requiring monthly presence, impediment to leave the country, bail of RD $100,000 and use of electronic locator to María Cristina Echeverri theíaz (owner of the business with Cornielle), Ireni Fabiola Abreu and Keyla Carolina Castro Llanos, who according to the Public Ministry they also participated in the illegal activity.

    https://www.metrord.do/do/destacado/...beria-spa.html

    And this new report:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hI0A9zWsVO4

  6. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    It does not take genius like me to determine the tide has turned against the sexual tourists running around with a hand full of pesos in one hand and a hand full of condoms in another. Just check the article out:

    https://dominicantoday.com/dr/local/...-tourist-town/
    90% Haitians? What a ridiculous statement.

  7. #73

    Prostitution steals the peace in local town.

    It does not take genius like me to determine the tide has turned against the sexual tourists running around with a hand full of pesos in one hand and a hand full of condoms in another. Just check the article out:

    https://dominicantoday.com/dr/local/...-tourist-town/

  8. #72

    Nine government officials dismissed.

    Source: DR1 Daily News. Wednesday 23 May 2018.

    Nine high ranking members of the Medina administration have been dismissed following public scandals for corruption, fraud, murder, [CodeWord123], murder for hire and even [CodeWord128]. The dismissals ordered by President Danilo Medina took place following a number of stories in the media based on court hearings.

    Van Troy Suazo was appointed on 19 February 2018 as Deputy Minister of Youth, but at the same time came a message from the jail in Bani that he was serving three months as coercive measures for domestic violence against his wife. The following day he was dismissed from his post. (Get right with ya! I wonder if he used the Marion Barry defense?

    Diandino Pea is the ex- director of Opret who was sacked following an interview with Alicia Ortega based on a nine month investigation showing that he was the main beneficiary and legal representative of at least 29 companies, including 15 registered abroad. (Fuck you! Pay me! The investigation also revealed he had quite a bit of money stashed offshore in companies and trusts.).

    Arsenio Quevedo, president of the National Union of Transporters (Utrafin) was dismissed as Deputy Director of the Metropolitan Office of Bus Services (OMSA) having been accused in 2015 of running a network of hit men, whose work was to kill drivers. (That's some original gangster shit right there).

    Manuel Rivas, former director of OMSA was fired on 16 October 2017 having been arrested linked to the case of the murder of University Professor Yuniol Ramrez, on Wednesday 11 October in the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo (UASD) car park. (Freedom of speech is a useless right when people are willing to pop a cap in you to shut you up. Guess I'm lucky to only have a few critics willing to talk tough from behind the relative safety of their computer screens.).

    Marlin Martnez was dismissed from the Passport Office after being accused of hiding evidence and complicity in the murder of pregnant teenager Emely Peguero, who was pregnant by her son. (No comment. But I have been following this case. This one has produced outrage among the people or the Dominican Republic. Although it begs the question about why some people think they can come to the Dominican Republic and monger with class. It's a delusion in their own minds if they think the people of the Dominican Republic are not looking at them as being without class. As it was explained to me there were class differences and social embarrassment wrapped up in this case).

    Donni Santana was dismissed as ambassador and director of the National Border Council having been investigated for supposedly [CodeWord125] his step-daughter. (No comment).

    Temstocles Monts, member of the Political Committee of the Dominican Liberation Party, was dismissed as Minister of Industry, Commerce and SMEs having been accused of accepting bribes from the Brazilian construction company, Odebrecht. (Didn't a lot of other people take money too?

    Leoncio Almnzar was dismissed as director of the Dominican Corporation of State Companies (CORDE) having been interrogated as being associated with the sale of land in the LOS Tres Brazos area of Santo Domingo East. (Don't know anything about this one).

    Jos Joaquand Domnguez Pea was fired two days after an investigation into land sales belonging to the State Sugar Council (CEA) recommended his removal as executive director. (And another one bites the dust in the long line of people who sold the one of the most valuable natural resources out from under the Dominican people. I've read about it. Done my research. The price people pay for sugar in my country of origin is inflated. Natural market prices are propped up to help a pair of brothers so powerful they could get FPOTUS to take a phone call in the middle of getting his dick sucked.).

    https://listindiario.com/la-republic...dalos-publicos

    Looks like President Danilo Medina has taken a course from the host of Political Apprentice in my country of origin. Because he be firing people!

    *Note the automatic censors intervened on many parts of the original news story. It ran afoul of the ISG prohibited word database.

  9. #71

    I'm back!

    Been a minute since I've updated this forum. If you are a "where the ho's at" sort of guy (with class or not) this is not the section for you. The very nature of this section is that it's full of opinions on the political stories that get posted. I happen to have a deep interest in politics from a observation standpoint.

    Dominicans in my social circle are very politically aware. They have a interest in the politics in my country of origin, Republic Dominicana, Latin American and the world. I listen intently when Dominicans in my social circle venture into discussions of the world of politics. I open my mouth only when they ask me to be their guide to the intricacies of the fucked up political and governmental world as it exists in my country of origin.

    Never thought of myself as a political expert, but when I speak about the politics of my country of origin it's like EF Hutton (yep, I'm dating myself) in the place. I have the opportunity to explain things from my dark side perspective. And explain I do. I give them insights into how things really work in my county of origin for those of us gifted with an above average amount of melatonin in our skin.

    Corruption runs deep in my country of origin. But the bad guys learned long ago to institutionalize corruption and take it out of the public eye. No more raw dog stealing of public funds. Contribute to my campaign when I get elected call me anytime you like when I can introduce or influence a bill that might help your company or you personally. In return you let me use your private jets and vacation homes in exclusive area. Continue to provide me with political support and give me market and business insights that I can use to make business deals or front run positive / negative news about companies with my offshore company or trust. And don't forget to pick up the phone after I'm done and looking for high paying job afterwards that allows me to sell access to all the people I got to know while in office. No matter where I started my national political career I'll leave with quite a bit more money than when I started. I'm from a place where a company is a person and has the right to speak. And speak they do with bags of money thrown around to get those in power to listen to them. No one does corruption the way they do corruption in my country of origin. No one!

    Fried brain? I think not. My lethal weapon is my mind. I'm a dark side brother speaking Spanish. It's only a matter of time before I become a enemy of the state. How do I know this? I got plenty of critics right here already. LOL! I've been tracking a number of political stories that are perfect to be covered in this section. There is much more to come. So, come on in. Let's have a discussion. And remember putas vote too.

  10. #70

    Police Corruption in the Dominican Republic

    Sourced from DR1 Daily News Tuesday June 13,2017.

    American policeman to go to jail for smuggling drugs into the country.

    A former Miami-Dade police officer who was accused of helping smuggle firearms to the Dominican Republic pleaded guilty Monday, 12 June 2017, in a Florida federal court to unlawfully exporting firearms.

    According to the Department of Justice, by pleading guilty, Michael Freshko admits that he used his position as a police officer to transport firearms past the TSA screening area at Miami International Airport. He confessed to handing off the guns to a co-conspirator near the departure gates. The co-conspirator would then store the guns in carry-on baggage and travel to the Dominican Republic aboard a commercial flight to deliver the guns to another associate.

    Department of Justice officials said Freshko confessed to smuggling multiple firearms in October and December 2012. Six guns were smuggled in all, including four Glock. 9 mm pistols, one Sig Sauer. 9 mm pistol and one Sig Sauer 5.56 rifle.

    Freshko faces a maximum sentence of five years in federal prison when he is sentenced.

    https://www.local10.com/news/crime/f...nican-republic

    This was about a corrupt US police officer smuggling firearms into the the Dominican Republic. Oh shit! But it sure would be interesting to know who his associates were in the Dominican Republic. Furthermore somebody has a excellent taste in weaponry. Although I have to say that I'm really not a big fan of the 9 mm stopping power. Give me a. 357 round in that Sig Sauer package and I'm ready to do some serious social work!

    So, the next time a discussion breaks out about petty corruption involving the police in the Dominican Republic ask yourself if it is a Dominican thing? Or is it a personality flaw in the individuals involved? Remember there is corruption in my country of origin and they do it bigger and better than anyone one else in the entire world (that's a personal opinion of course). Google: "Bribery navy admiral" and take a look at the articles that come up.

  11. #69

    Immigration

    The ambassador of Venezuela (hereafter referred to as V's) in the Dominican Republic (DR) says that 3000 - 4000 V's have legal status in the DR, while around 20,000 V's are living here undocumented since last year last year as reported in El DIA. The ambassador admitted that economic reasons are behind the migration of most of those arriving in the DR. Now I just love this because I finally have a political story in this section that I can relate directly to pussy. LOL!

    Economic reasons eh?

    Well the V escorts I've run across are not having any economic problems. They are charging 3000 - 5000 pesos from anywhere from 1 hour to 3 hours and they are not coming off the price one bit. Of course one of my boys referred me (here I go again posting information someone gave me) to an agency where the V escorts will come directly to your hotel room or apartment for about the same price. That way you save the cabana fee.

    Now, I wonder why the V's can charge so much more than the Dominican's and Haitian's selling pussy?

    When it comes to that, I have nothing for you man. I mean it's all pussy; wet, warm and pink on the inside. And what's with all this reporting about pussy stink lately? There is a difference between the smell of pussy needing a quick wash up and having some sort of infection. And every great pussy hunter should know the difference. I know I do! But I digress.

  12. #68

    Nothing happens in a vacuum

    DR1 Daily News. Thursday, 9 February 2017:

    "Migration Agency says it treats people with respect.

    In a written statement, the Migration Agency (DGM) reiterated on Wednesday, 8 February 2017, their respect for human rights and that the entity carries out its duties professionally. Recently there has been criticism regarding operations that aim to verify the legal status of foreigners in the country.

    In the press statement, the agency says that foreigners whose documents are expired are required in a respectful manner to get them up to date by the agents. The DGM confirmed that immigration inspectors are combing the country, with a focus in tourist areas and their agents have been instructed to give all persons the best of treatment. The official statement says: "It is not true that we are causing panic among foreigners who are illegal he in the country; what is happening is that they have to normalize their status just like what happens in other countries where some Dominicans may be living without proper travel papers. ".

    The Migration agency says that when an inspector detains a foreigner because he or she cannot produce valid documentation, the agents are instructed to immediately refer that person to the proper authorities so these may update their papers. The document says that these actions are routine and the agents are performing their duties in the same manner as in other countries.

    http://elnacional.com.do/migracion-d...d-de-ilegales/".

  13. #67

    Dominicans Espaillat, Alcantara, De la Rosa and Peralta win in US election

    From DR1 9 November 2016:

    In the election that ended with the surprise win by Republican candidate businessman Donald Trump over former first lady, senator and secretary of state Hillary Clinton, Dominican Democrat candidates fared well.

    Democrat Adriano Espaillat became the first Dominican-American to be elected to the House of Representatives of the United States in the general election in the United States on Tuesday, 8 November 2016. He will succeed Representative Charles Rangel, a fellow Democrat who has held the seat since 1971.

    "I am deeply grateful to the people of the 13th Congressional District for electing me to serve as their next Congressman," he remarked via his Twitter account.

    In comments to the Wall Street Journal after the election, Espaillat said:

    "It really is about new leadership. It's about turning the page," Mr. Espaillat, a Democrat, said in an interview. "In the Bronx, in Harlem or Washington Heights, I've found a lot of excitement from people willing to sit down with me and trying to influence the next 10 years of this district."

    Espaillat had endorsed Marisol Alcantara, the Democratic district leader in Harlem, to succeed him in his 31st District seat of the New York Senate as he ran to replace Rep. Charles Rangel. Alcantara was also elected with 85.6% of the vote.

    http://www.nytimes.com/elections/res...te-district-31

    Dominican Carmen de la Rosa was elected to the New York District 72 State Assembly with 79% of the vote. She was uncontested.

    http://www.nytimes.com/elections/res...se-district-72

    Jose Peralta, running on the Democratic ticket for the New York 13th District seat in the New York State Senate, also won with 86.7% of the vote.

    http://www.nytimes.com/elections/res...te-district-13

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/espailla...eat-1478649622

  14. #66

    Medina says the US is a 10 lane Highway for drugs

    And he is right! I'm glad the Dominican President got in that ass. The US has no standing to talk to anyone about the growing, processing, packing and transportation of drugs when it can't even get a handle on the social conditions that have spawned a increase of domestic drug use that has grown to nearly epidemic proportions. Hell, even a couple of states have thrown in the towel on the weed issue. And the Feds have now softened the banking regulations to all allow the weed business access to the banking system (I guess there was too much cash moving that the government couldn't get a handle on). Now personally as long as your drug use does not effect me personally (I. E. Your are not providing me with services while using drugs) I could give a fuck what you prefer to smoke, sniff, pop or shoot. US people want to get high but the US government wants to ride a high horse and start calling out other countries about drugs. RUN-DMC said it best: "They be illin".

    From DR1 Daily New: 21 Friday October 2016.

    "President Danilo Medina has responded to US Ambassador Brewster's recent comments describing the Dominican Republic as a growing transshipment point for drugs to the United States by comparing the US to a 10-lane highway for the drugs that enter the DR for shipment to the US. Brewster said that drug operations were endangering investments in the country.

    Medina said: "There is talk that the Dominican Republic is a bridge for drugs. For that matter, then the United States is a 10-lane highway for the destination of the same drugs. ".

    In his remarks, US Ambassador Brewster also spoke of administrative corruption that could affect US investments in the country and any prospective investors in the Dominican market. Medina responded to questions from journalists by asking: "What corruption?" he said the US ambassador should be specific and not speak in general terms.

    Medina was speaking on Thursday, 20 October 2016 while receiving credentials from the new ambassadors of the Netherlands, Japan, Honduras, India, Poland and Belgium at the Presidential Palace. "

  15. #65

    Are you serious?

    I just booked a ticket to Santo Domingo and the airline saw fit to give me a detailed accounting of the collective JACK from the respective governments. The information is posted below for anyone who is interested. It should be noted that the US Government sees fit to tax me on my worldwide income (I'm a individual not a corporation). I've already paid income taxes on the money I used to buy the ticket when I earned it. No, I'm not Trump. I can't just walk around grabbing women in the pussy (in the US or the DR) and I've got to pay taxes. GTF!

    Taxes, Fees and Charges.

    Dominican Republic. Airport Authority Fee (UX).

    $15.00 USD.

    United States. September 11th Security Fee (Passenger Civil Aviation Security Service Fee) (AY).

    $5.60 USD.

    Dominican Republic. Airport Infrastructure Fee (VB).

    $16.30 USD.

    United States. Passenger Facility Charge (XF).

    $9.00 USD.

    United States. Transportation Tax (US).

    $17.80 USD.

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