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  1. #92

    For those in living in Puta Pueblos who asked

    This is the Politics in the Dominican Republic thread. In my opinion, cutting and pasting a post from anywhere in the Dominican Republic Forum dealing with politics and then commenting on it here is completely appropriate.

    "Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but not their own facts". - Daniel Patrick Moynihan.

  2. #91

    More on Politics in the Dominican Republic to come. This is the thread for that!

    Amid Ukraine swirl, Giuliani's work for candidate in Dominican Republic caused unease.

    By Joshua Partlow and Josh Dawsey, Feb. 20,2020 at 10:20 am AST.

    "Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic The politics of this Caribbean island nation do not frequently capture*the attention of the stewards of America's foreign policy, but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo phoned down*last summer with a clear message.

    Dominican President Danilo Medina's supporters were pushing to change the country's constitution to allow him to run for an unprecedented third term. In a call with the president, Pompeo emphasized the importance of "adherence to rule of law and the constitution," according to a State Department readout.

    That message was echoed a week later in person by President Trump's personal attorney Rudolph W. Giuliani.

    "If you want to change the constitution, change it for the future," Giuliani told reporters during a July 2019 visit to Santo Domingo. "Don't make it look like you're changing it for you. Don't change it for this election. ".

    Giuliani was not in the Dominican Republic as Trump's representative. He was speaking as a paid consultant to an opposition presidential candidate, Luis Abinader, a businessman who had been protesting the possibility of a constitutional change allowing the incumbent to run again.

    Days later, Medina*announced*that he would not seek reelection.

    The overlapping interests of the USA Administration and Giuliani's paying client underscores how his decision to work as an international consultant while serving as Trump's lawyer has caused disquiet, both among foreign leaders and USA Administration officials.

    Giuliani's presence in Santo Domingo annoyed rival Dominican presidential candidates who felt Abinader was trying to buy his campaign an American seal of approval, according to candidates and their advisers. And it concerned officials in the presidential palace who scrutinized Giuliani's comments for signs he was speaking for Trump, according to a person familiar with the discussions who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal talks.

    Giuliani's visit to the Dominican Republic came around the same time that he with Trump's backing had been pressing Pompeo and USA Diplomats to push Ukraine to announce investigations into Trump's political opponents, a gambit that led to the president's impeachment.

    The State Department did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

    Giuliani did not respond directly to a question about whether he met with anyone at the State Department about his client there.

    "Why in the world would you care about my work in the DR except to once again try to suggest falsely that there is some question about it?" he asked in a text message. "Don't you have anything better to do? Whatever I did in DR was perfectly lawful and appropriate. ".

    The full scope of Giuliani's clientele is not known. The uncertainty about who he represents and his willingness to take on foreign clients with interests before the USA Government while working for the president has alarmed senior administration officials, as The Washington Post*has previously reported.

    In his various meetings last year with foreign and USA Officials, Giuliani toggled between serving as Trump's emissary and representing other interests. During a sit-down in August with a top Ukrainian official to discuss the investigations Trump wanted, Giuliani*advocated*for a former client, the mayor of Kyiv. On that same trip, he stayed at a historic estate of a client, Venezuelan energy executive Alejandro Betancourt Lpez and*later met with top Justice Department officials*to urge them not to charge him in a money-laundering case.

    Giuliani, who says he works for Trump free, has told The Post that he is always careful to make clear he is a private lawyer for the president, not a representative of the USA Government.

    Since 2015, Giuliani has been hired by Abinader as a security consultant two times, according to Samuel Pereyra, an official in the Abinader campaign who managed the contracts. *His most recent contract, for $75,000, was secured last June, Pereyra said, more than a year after Giuliani joined Trump's legal team.

    For that sum, Giuliani made a two-day trip to the Dominican Republic in July, appearing with the candidate at a briefing for reporters and visiting a poor neighborhood in the capital, where he said people shouldn't have to live behind bars like prisoners.

    While he was there, Giuliani also*puffed cigars at his favorite Dominican cigar club and dined at the residence of the USA Ambassador, Robin Bernstein, one of Trump's longtime Palm Beach, Fla. , friends and an original member of Mar-a-Lago,*according to people familiar with his activities.

    Some members of Abinader's campaign team felt it was a mistake to*rehire*Giuliani, saying he spoke in generalities and provided little of value, and worried that the candidate had brought him aboard to get access to the president.

    "I think Abinader wanted a direct line to Trump," said one adviser,*who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal discussions. "For me, that's the principal reason he was hired: It's a link to the White House and the State Department. ".

    Abinader denied that, telling The Post in an interview that he did not hire Giuliani to curry favor with the Trump administration. The two discussed only security issues, he said.

    'Corruption no mas'.

    The campaign caravan inched through the narrow streets of Villa Altagracia, a working-class exurb north of Santo Domingo, blasting merengue and reggaeton basslines for the dancing crowds. Abinader stood up through the sunroof of his armored SUV and blew kisses to those below.

    "Here he is, the next president of the republic!" the emcee called out last month.

    With his composed, somewhat stiff persona, Abinader is not known for his charisma with the masses. But his pro-business, law-and-order message has resonated with voters who are tired of persistent crime and allegations of corruption in a ruling party that has been in power for 20 of the past 24 years. The Dominican Republic was ranked last year in the bottom quarter of Transparency International's list of most corrupt countries in the world.

    Abinader is a wealthy businessman of Lebanese descent whose father had been a cabinet minister, a presidential candidate and the founder of a private university. His family's diverse holdings included hotels, cement plants and data processing centers, according to Abinader's advisers.

    Before Abinader's first run for president in 2016, public opinion surveys showed that Dominicans' most pressing concern was crime and violence, and his polling numbers on these topics trailed other candidates.

    Like many Dominicans, Abinader had relatives in New York City, with particularly strong connections to Queens: His grandfather ran Corona Hardware in the borough. One of his cousins, Rodolfo Fuertes, was the president of the National Supermarket Association at the time, and suggested in 2015 that Abinader's campaign might benefit from Giuliani's help, Abinader said in an interview.

    The former New York mayor was famous for reducing crime during his tenure. After leaving office, Giuliani sought to capitalize on that reputation, offering consulting services on security and police reform to countries around the world.

    "You have to see Giuliani, he can clean up Santo Domingo," Abinader recalled being told in a meeting with Fuertes and others.

    After being hired on a $100,000 contract, Giuliani Security and Safety produced a 38-page*report*for the campaign in April 2016 that discussed crime trends and recommended several reforms of the Dominican police, Pereyra said.

    That year, during a visit to Santo Domingo, Giuliani told an audience that the solution to the country's crime problems boiled down to one thing: eliminating corruption.

    "No tolerance. Not allowed. It has to end," Giuliani told the crowd. "Corruption no mas. ".

    Abinader lost that bid. After Trump won his White House race later that year, Giuliani invited Abinader to the inauguration, where he attended a Latino gala at the Mandarin Oriental hotel in Washington and met with Giuliani and others, Abinader said.

    Abinader decided to rehire Giuliani last June, Pereyra said. Abinader said in an interview that he valued Giuliani's counsel on security matters and the firm's advice helped him generate a security plan for the country.

    "It was a very important campaign issue," Abinader said. "I ended up highest in the polls in terms of fighting criminality. "

    A visit from the president's lawyer.

    By last summer, with Giuliani's Ukrainian efforts at full steam, he made*a return trip to Santo Domingo. At that point, Giuliani had been Trump's personal lawyer for nearly a year and a half.

    He also had been in contact with the secretary of state. In late March, Giuliani spoke to Pompeo by phone at least twice, according to*State Department emails. *In May, he sent Pompeo*a packet of materials*about his Ukraine research in a Manila envelope with "The White House" written as the return address, according to documents released during the impeachment probe.

    Giuliani has said repeatedly that he did not do any lobbying related to his consulting in the Dominican Republic. In a previous interview with The Post, he described his work there and in other countries as focused only on security services.

    Given his prominence, the Abinader campaign asked the USA Embassy if it wanted to provide security for Giuliani's visit in July. Embassy officials declined, as Giuliani was not a USA Government employee, according to Abinader advisers.

    The embassy referred questions about Giuliani's visit to the State Department, which did not respond to requests for comment.

    Abinader's team picked Giuliani up from the airport on July 16. The candidate and his aides met with Giuliani in a JW Marriott conference room for a couple of hours to discuss what Giuliani would tell the press the following day.

    "Giuliani was the frontman, the personality," said Roberto lvarez, a former Dominican ambassador to the Organization of American States and a foreign policy adviser to Abinader who met with Giuliani that day. "he knows nothing about the cultural context. "

    During his visit, Giuliani had dinner with Bernstein, the USA Ambassador, and her husband, Richard, who were Republican donors and had both sold insurance to Trump while in Palm Beach.

    One person who attended the embassy dinner with Giuliani described it as a social call, not a political gathering. The only topic of conversation this person recalled was the recent deaths of tourists at Dominican resorts, an image crisis for the government at the time.

    The morning after his arrival, Giuliani had a breakfast meeting with Dominican journalists and then gave a*news conference*at the JW Marriott, according to the campaign.

    At that time, the constitutional question had seized Dominican politics. Critics of the proposal, including Abinader and other opponents, had staged protests and rallies to demand that the pro-Medina legislature not move forward with allowing a third term.

    "Keep the rules the way they are. Respect democracy," Giuliani told reporters that day. He mentioned he was speaking as a "private citizen."

    A story in the Diario Libre newspaper about his visit referred to him as "the lawyer for the president of the United States. " A headline that day on Dominican Today, an online news site, read: "Giuliani jumps into Dominican Republic's reelection fray."

    A wealthy Venezuelan hosted Giuliani as he pursued Ukraine campaign. Then Giuliani lobbied the Justice Department on his behalf.

    His visit was closely monitored by aides to Medina, the current president, who scrutinized Giuliani's remarks to see if he was speaking on behalf of Trump.

    Abinader wanted "to associate himself with the Trump administration and show that he is America's man," said one senior Dominican*official,*who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.

    Abinader's rival candidates also saw Giuliani's presence as an attempt to signal an endorsement from the USA President.

    "It's a game of perception; they're trying to leave the impression" that "the government of the United States favors them," said Leonel Fernndez, a former president who is running again this year. "In the end, the Dominican voters are going to decide. They don't care whether President Trump is in favor or against. ".

    Lvarez, the adviser to Abinader, denied that, saying the relationship with Giuliani was only about advice on security matters.

    "Never did we use his contact in order to move USA Policy," he said.

    After two days, Giuliani jetted out of Santo Domingo.

    The Abinader campaign is now getting consulting advice on security issues from a former Giuliani partner, John Huvane, who left Giuliani's firm in October, officials said. Huvane did not respond to a request for comment.

    In recent polls, Abinader has held a strong lead more than 10 points over his two main rivals, including Medina's handpicked successor. The election will be held in May."

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...faa_story.html

    I do not have much good to say about that Mother Fucker Giuliani. Except that he is one. The Dominican Republic should be able to run it own affairs without interference. Flag down on the field!

  3. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    News flash. Sosua is in the Dominican Republic!

    Do you have anything to say about Politics in the Dominican Republic here? Or will you simply continue to post about your lifestyle?
    Lol

    Nah, I'm only here because you copied a post I had made in another forum, on the current status of the DR Elections, and pasted it here!

    "Already one dead in SD and voting machines are having technical problems. Don't recall this much fooferaw in past elections".

    Is that your convoluted and contorted way of starting a conversation? Is it normal Forum etiquette?

    Lol

  4. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    Over and out!
    News flash. Sosua is in the Dominican Republic!

    Do you have anything to say about Politics in the Dominican Republic here? Or will you simply continue to post about your lifestyle?

  5. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    ***No you didn't your leader "led" you to it. 10 years checking out the Republic Dominicana. That means I was living here for 5 years before you even figured out where to move in the country. So sorry. It's in the record as you like to say. LOL!***

    I don't have a leader or "men in the arena".

    That's why in 10 years, I never took up the offers to meet up with any of the posters here! Never met any posters here. and don't intend to! Not looking for friends here! Or approval!

    But it was a few posts by Mr GoGo that I read in this forum that got me interested in Sosua, 10 years ago! I always credit him with that.

    *** So time for you and your leader to come clean on the vehicle thing. Is it a lifestyle choice? Or is an affordability issue?***

    You seem so hung up on your damn car! Never had one before? Lol. I got one sitting in a heated garage back in TO, but I don't obsess about it.
    Over and out!

  6. #87

    Oakie got his groove back in Sosua. I'm happy for ya my man!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    Your "fellow man in the arena" left the puta pueblo many moons ago!
    I know. Grownman wrote a trip report. It was excellent. You even commented on it. Now tell me more about your bus riding leader is doing my man.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    I spent 10 years checking out all parts of the DR while deciding on a place to live. Yep SD too!
    No you didn't your leader "led" you to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    A shout out to you, and Mr Gogo, who introduced me to Susua 10 years ago, and showed me how to navigate this fucked up paradise!
    10 years checking out the Republic Dominicana. That means I was living here for 5 years before you even figured out where to move in the country. So sorry. It's in the record as you like to say. LOL!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    I chose this place
    Great brother. You like it I love it!

    "USA News & World Report. October 31,2018.

    Santo Domingo: An Affordable Caribbean City for Retirement.

    The capital of the Dominican Republic is a cosmopolitan beach retirement spot.

    SANTO DOMINGO IS THE oldest city in the Americans, with more than 500 years of history. It's also one of the region's most affordable places to live or retire well.

    The first thing that attracts most retirees and expats to the area is the low cost of living. Prices are a bargain relative to elsewhere in the region. You could buy an apartment in one of the city's new high-rise towers for as little as $100,000. A reasonable budget for a couple enjoying a high-end quality of life can be as little as $1,000 per month if you own your home. Rent adds another $500 to $800 per month. At the upper end of this monthly budget you could rent a big three-bedroom, four-bath*apartment*with marble floors, crown molding, decorative woodwork and a balcony view of the Caribbean.

    Often, Caribbean living can mean compromising on comfort levels. That's not the case in Santo Domingo. This is a modern city that offers a way of life that's laid-back and seductive, while also being focused on economic growth".

    https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs...for-retirement

    1000 USD a month to live in Santo Domingo. Shit! Got to be less living in that puta puerto up there. So time for you and your leader to come clean on the vehicle thing. Is it a lifestyle choice? Or is an affordability issue?

    Because it should be noted that your "leader" has ridden around in my vehicle plenty of times when he needed for me to drive him around so he could do something. I always did it thinking I was helping out a fellow. Turns out he didn't really appreciate everything I did for him. Now he's anti car talking shit about something that does not even concern him. Shouldn't concern you either. Yet, you chose to mention it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    although your recent post indicates that you are not happy where you are! (Here's where the egg starts to slide down your face.)
    Really? That sound you are about to hear is the splinters flying from having it broken off in your ass.

    Where do I live? Where was I writing about? Answer the question!

    But before you do, call your favorite chica and have her run to the farmacia (Pharmacy) for some medical supplies to help you out my man.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    I'll be happy to drive you all around in style! Lol
    Impossible to do my man. Already walked it. Your leader showed me Cabarete and Puerta Plata. If Cabarete was closer I would spend more time there. But I was bored in Sosua after three days (best thing was the girls) and unimpressed with Puerta Plata. But I have said: If you like it. I love it. I don't have to live there you do.

    Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este has for me "Caribbean living without compromising on comfort levels. " So, because I don't like the traffic and the changes I see being made that means I am unhappy? A puta pueblo does not have what Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este has. Not even close. Anyone who reads it that way is having serious reading compression problems in English. If you really have paid attention to my posts over the years instead of just having a knee jerk reaction every time you are quoted or somebody says something bad about Sosua you would know that I don't live in Santo Domingo este anymore. Now that has me rolling on the floor laughing. Your egg missed me!

    BTW, when did I move over to the dark side? Because I've been a gringo negro trying to make it in a Dominican world the entire time I've lived here. It's in the record. So tan barrio (I'm so hood). Got a problem with that? Put me on ignore. But my haters read every word I write. How else could they respond or comment that what I write is not worth reading? Are they having others read my posts and give them reports? I don't have answers to all those questions. But maybe you do. Can you help a brother out?

    Do you have anything so say about Dominican Politics? When they finally have the election will it have any effect on the lifestyle in Sosua that you have chosen? Let me know about that. Because I could really give a fuck about your personal life. Now, I appreciate you sharing your life story of how you found happiness in Sosua. It's sort of like the smile that came to my face when I read about old man parting on el conde. You like it. Then I love it. Enjoy your puta pueblo. And don't be so touchy when someone does not share your rose colored view of the place please.

  7. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    Probably like most people who live outside of the country you were not paying much attention to them. I was! And for those who live in puta pueblos consider what my fellow man in the arena has to say about that.

    Actually, I'm going to continue to comment on whatever I choose the in whatever forum I choose. As for you, feel free to get out of the puta pueblo that you live in and see the rest of Republica Dominicana. I'm here if you need a tour of Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este. In the meantime continue to enjoy your puta pueblo AKA Sosua.
    Lol.

    Your "fellow man in the arena" left the puta pueblo many moons ago!

    I spent 10 years checking out all parts of the DR while deciding on a place to live. Yep SD too!

    I chose this place:

    *********************

    USA News & World Report.

    Sosua and Cabarete Voted the 2nd Best Beach Place to Retire.

    All of us who spend time on the north coast of the Dominican Republic already knew this, but it's nice to have someone else say it too. From the report:

    2. Sosua / Cabarete, Dominican Republic. Where the verdant green jungle hills slope into the crystal-blue waters off the north coast of the Dominican Republic rest the sand-fringed towns of Sosua and neighboring Cabarete. These are beachfront utopias. There are no high-rise towers, no big crowds and no worries. Life here is all about enjoying what mother nature has created in this world-class coastal spot.

    Best Places to Reire (insidermonky.com) 6. Sosua.

    6. Sosua and its next door neighbor Cabarete are popular for its young crowd and their usual crowd pleasers of water sports and adventures, bars, and other nightspots; but the small town of Sosua located on the northern coast of the Dominican Republic is also a growing retirement favorite. The beach city has everything about the ideal Caribbean beach life perfected to a T and with retirement communities and more developments underway, it should be on every list of the best places to retire in the Dominican Republic.

    *****************

    And I'm happy here. I hang with locals and ex pats, not mongers "in the arena". You can save your tours for your fellow mongers in the arena! I got a car waiting for me anytime I want one. No investment, no insurance, no parking, no traffic, no mechanics, no depreciation. You'd be surprised at the dinero saved, not to mention the convenience, especially if you like a couple beers occasionally. Lol.

    You'd also be surprised that there is more to life than cheap P4 P sex, although your recent post indicates that you are not happy where you are! (Here's where the egg starts to slide down your face, Lol).

    You say:

    "Another thing that is really killing the appeal of Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este is the increasingly traffic nightmare that exists here. Others are up in here talking about people making a move out of Sosua to Santo Domingo. Bad move gentlemen (and I use that word loosely). I'm going north and east. In my opinion although the big cities offer the best entertainment lifestyle and activities for day to day life but they leave much to be desired (like the side effects from medicine or a hangover). In the small towns outside the big cities the chicas are hungry for excitement and pesos and they will take you dick to get the former and not demand much of the latter."

    So feel free to come with your fellow men in the arena and discover what the North Coast has to offer, besides cheap monger sex.

    I'll be happy to drive you all around in style! Lol

  8. #85

    Election Canceled!

    How in the fuck do you do that? Hey, guys looks like we are going to lose this one badly. Like hell we are. Fuck that shit. Cancel the election. Let's try it again another day. That is some straight gangster shit if I ever saw it.

    Quote Originally Posted by GrownMan1  [View Original Post]
    Many people talk about how ugly the election can get. Some Dominicans and Haitians are giving me a fearful vibe. They expect it to be a lot of fights today. I don't understand why you would have elections on Sunday but I'm sure they have their reasons.
    Grownman, elections here are no joke. I got contacts on the ground who are responsible for security during the election. They take their responsibilities seriously.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    Because that is the day everybody is off work and can go vote. In our country it is the opposite and everybody complains about the polls closing before they can get a chance to get there from work.
    Same way in my country of origin. They want to suppress the vote from people who have to work for a living. In my country of origin, passive (unearned) income is king. They even tax at a lower rate than earned income (the money regular people make by going to work nearly everyday).

    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    Election is on Sunday. I'm preparing for wide spread civil unrest.
    I said it and I was serious. I made sure all my drinking water bottles were filled up; Stocked the pantry and the refrigerator; filled the tank of the Grand Jefe mobile and hit the ATM for some effectivo (cold hard cash gentlemen, paper, chedder, cheese, DOP)!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    Already one dead in SD and voting machines are having technical problems. Don't recall this much fooferaw inpast elections.
    Really check this out:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-d...-idUSKCN0Y72AY

    Probably like most people who live outside of the country you were not paying much attention to them. I was! And for those who live in puta pueblos consider what my fellow man in the arena has to say about that.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    Whenever foreigners congregate in puta pueblos without experiencing the rest of a country, they think the whole country is the same as the puta pueblo. It is just like going to Miami where the overwhelming majority is Latin and Haitian decent and start generalizing saying Americans this, that, and the other. Those same rules are not going to apply in Seattle, Minneapolis, or Washington, D.C.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oakie  [View Original Post]
    My post was about Sosua, posted in the Sosua Forum for Sosua visitors. Feel free to comment there! In the meantime enjoy your SD!
    Actually, I'm going to continue to comment on whatever I choose the in whatever forum I choose. As for you, feel free to get out of the puta pueblo that you live in and see the rest of Republica Dominicana. I'm here if you need a tour of Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este. In the meantime continue to enjoy your puta pueblo AKA Sosua. How is your leader doing up there? LOL!

  9. #84

    A reality check!

    Quote Originally Posted by IpanemaCarioca  [View Original Post]
    The Dominicans are nice people, but everyone see an American, Canadian, or European as a target. And a business woman in Sosua told me that in their mind, any gringo who moves to their country must be broke, and move to the DR because they are barely affording to live in their country.
    Your business chica is an idiot who thinks she is better than everyone else while profiting on the "poor broke gringos" she serves. GTF out of here!

    Let me start that saying most Americans, Canadians and Europeans that come to Republica Dominicana have money when they get here. No matter how much or how little they are not looking for work like the Dominicans who go to my country of origin are doing. They can support themselves via the money they have earned before they arrive at their shores or by the work they are able to do via a internet connection while they are here.

    Every visitor and individual who lives here supports the Dominican Republic in a way that even the average Dominican cannot do. From the purchase of goods and services to the payment of the myriad of consumption taxes that are placed on consumer goods by the government of the Dominican Republic. The opinion of your Dominican chica who owns a business shows that she is uneducated and lacks any real business knowledge. A real business person knows that every product that does not originate on the island of hispaniola is purchased using United States Dollars (USD). Let me repeat that for you: Every product that does not originate on the island of hispaniola is purchased using USD. That means every person spending USD on the island of hispaniola is pumping much needed hard currency into the economy here.

    https://dominicantoday.com/dr/econom...mit-at-us2000/

    The Dominican Republic would take a tremendous hit if tourists stop coming. But your business chica's attitude does not surprise me. She lives in a puta pueblo. Consider the words of my fellow man in the arena:

    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    Whenever foreigners congregate in puta pueblos without experiencing the rest of a country, they think the whole country is the same as the puta pueblo. It is just like going to Miami where the overwhelming majority is Latin and Haitian decent and start generalizing saying Americans this, that, and the other. Those same rules are not going to apply in Seattle, Minneapolis, or Washington, D.C.
    Quote Originally Posted by IpanemaCarioca  [View Original Post]
    I have been going to Sosua and DR since 2009, and all I can say is do not let the Dominicans play us, because they have enough knowledge to manipulate us with their home field advantage and will always be 2 steps ahead of all you let them know from their free ISG membership and free youtube subscription.
    ISG is not behind a paywall. Anyone who knows about the site can read whatever they want on it. You talk about home field advantage? You think Dominicans don't know what is going on in their own country? Do you think they need ISG for intelligence gathering when they can fucking walk into any establishment that they like? GTF!

  10. #83

    A discussion of race has no place in Dominican Republic

    Quote Originally Posted by GrownMan1  [View Original Post]
    Dammit that damn Gogo. Now I'm headed to the Sue to get up with his crew. Taking my road dog Bro Jay. We're going to give this place two days I really want to give an honest evaluation. Brother P sounds like you and I may have the same gripes.
    IMHO That segregation or separation is targeted toward the Haitians. There wasn't A major problem with guys doing videos. Video footage of the Su has been floating around for years. That's why the club still allows video coverage inside of the resort. They actually want the promotion. When you control the movement of the people you control who is allowed to enter the premises. Thus no more freedom to roam hurts the Haitians the most because some don't have paperwork.
    And even if they did have paperwork unless they are a little connected no entry. The Dominicans don't mind black or white Americans money, but they do have a problem with the Haitians getting money.
    Those who use the term segregation in relation to the Dominican Republic are projecting their issues and problems that they incur in their country of origin here. This is not your country of origin. I suggest that everyone leave those type of problems at home when they board their flight.

    The Dominicans are free to do in their country as they chose and as a visitor you can choose to deal with it or exercise your options. Anyone that has a problem with how Dominicans run their country can simply visit another country. When I read up in here about mongers getting upset with the government of the Dominican Republic I lose about 5 minutes of my time rolling on the floor laughing.

    I'm not saying I agree with the treatment of the Haitians. But somebody need to tell me if thee are now "Whites only" signs on business in Sosua. My guess they are not. So, that means anyone with good Spanish can enjoy a nice glass of wine and a good meal downtown. Enjoy the music and conversations we not be confined to Ahnvee unless they choose to not exercise the freedom of movement they are allowed. The restrictions to them are in their mind only.

    Monger money is chump change in the overall tourism market. Prostitution is legal in this county. The government of the Dominican Republic can regulate it however they choose within their own laws. That's keeping it real!

    I see people using code words. And now I am seeing posts where the poster comes right out and says he has a racial issues. But the Dominican Republic is not racist. You are either Dominican (I will leave it to others to define if they are real) are you are not. That's it!

    I've has some words with Old Kool. I like casas. He does not. We have agreed to disagree on that point. We are still both ejaculating into the various orifices of the chicas of our personal choices. But I have never read a racist comment that he has posted up in here. Ever!

  11. #82

    Dominican Republic tourist arrivals grow 5%, led by US

    Santo Domingo In the last eight years the Dominican Republic posted an average annual growth of 5% in tourist arrivals, adding 45.2 million visitors between 2012 and 2019, the Tourism Ministry affirmed Sunday.

    During that period, 38.7 million non-resident foreigners visited the Caribbean country, or 85.6% of the total, while non-resident Dominicans accounted for 6. 4 million, 14.4% of the total.

    The United States tops the list of tourist issuing countries by air with 15.9 million, followed by Canada that holds second place as an issuer, with 6. 2 million.

    https://dominicantoday.com/dr/econom...w-5-led-by-us/

    No break down by type of tourist. LOL!

  12. #81

    Hot at every age!

    Anyone else not fully engulfed in the El Conde / Zona Colonial night life and happen to be paying attention to the municipal elections coming in the country?

    Check out the smoking hot 50 year old MILF that is a candidate for Alcalde (google if it you don't understand what the position entails). It would be a tough decision where to blow my splooge with her. LOL!

    Comes back to something I really like about the Dominican Republic. Girls are hot at any age here. And they are consistently 2 - 4 points higher appearance wise than the girls from my country of origin. And if appearance does not matter to you then you are either blind or just lying to us about your dick because you don't want everyone to know you fuck ugly girls. I've never had anyone tell me they wanted referrals of girls between 5 - 7's. It's always 8 - 10's.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Carolina Mejia.jpg‎  

  13. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    I walked into the Bravo on San Isidro and heard a sound that almost made me vomit on the spot. They were playing Boney James over the load speakers. It was an assault on my ear holes that finally brought to the forefront of this nagging feeling that I was having that something was wrong here in Republica Dominicana. And that is the Americanization of the country by multi-national businesses, growing american style consumerism and an advance of the worst that culture Americana has to offer.
    Well articulated, thoughtful write up. I remember the very first years, when one could hear local music rather than what these days passes for music, coming from the US.

    Kudos!

  14. #79

    Republica Dominicana, Colombia and the United States of America

    Quote Originally Posted by Questner  [View Original Post]
    Just imagine some sort of Ministry of Tourism, or Ministry of War for that matter, starts making decisions on which bars may open in the US.

    They have to come clear on why and by which authority they have been shut down in the first place, and don't allow it to repeat again.

    Unlike Colombia, somehow Dominicans don't get the concept of the right to work, somehow they have some strange vision of protecting the vulnerable, somehow they find acceptable to harass their own women.
    I find your post curious. I wonder why you compare different countries (three actually) with three different systems and cultures? Do you actually expect everything to be uniform throughout the world?

    If you are a RD vet, then you know that the law here is what the controlling legal authority says it is at the time until the next controlling legal authority of greater influence says it is something different. Dominicans have a vote. But they don't have a say after the politicos are in office.

    Prostitution remains legal in RD. So whatever is going on in Sosua is not about the law. In Sosua from what I read (as I don't live there) it seems like the controlling legal authorities want it off the streets and in certain places. Even in Santo Domingo there are streets where you can find prostitutes and ones you cannot. It's really that basic. I'm reading the Sosua forum and laughing my ass off that these off-islanders don't understand that regular tourism trumps sex tourism by about 10 times when it comes to actual money spent.

    Lastly, if anyone finds another country that treats them better, I'm a big believer in going where you are treated best. For example, in my opinion there is no better place for making money for a person with no capital and no connections than the United States of America. Whereas there are many different countries throughout the world that have different lifestyles that are better than the United States of America. I find the climate and beaches of Republica Dominicana to be appealing. So much so, I've voted with my pesos and invested here. I have heard from several people who have relatives who live in Colombia that the infrastructure is much better. And it's much less expensive to live there. But if you are an extranjero it's unlikely you are going to get a loan to buy anything (especially real estate).

    What's the point of comparing countries?

  15. #78

    Pretty much hits every nail on the head.

    Quote Originally Posted by SubCmdr  [View Original Post]
    I walked into the Bravo on San Isidro and heard a sound that almost made me vomit on the spot. They were playing Boney James over the load speakers. It was an assault on my ear holes that finally brought to the forefront of this nagging feeling that I was having that something was wrong here in Republica Dominicana. And that is the Americanization of the country by multi-national businesses, growing american style consumerism and an advance of the worst that culture Americana has to offer.

    Now I don't know if this push is really a demand by Dominicans for everything american. My personal feeling is that the United States of America is way over played throughout the world. Too many believe the hype. The United States of America is devoid of culture, exports the worst of it's habits as culture, and is only good for doing one thing, making money. Now you can consider productivity a culture. But all that work that Americans put in don't do them any good unless they are owners of capital.

    Another thing that is really killing the appeal of Santo Domingo / Santo Domingo este is the increasingly traffic nightmare that exists here. Others are up in here talking about people making a move out of Sosua to Santo Domingo. Bad move gentlemen (and I use that word loosely). I'm going north and east. In my opinion although the big cities offer the best entertainment lifestyle and activities for day to day life but they leave much to be desired (like the side effects from medicine or a hangover). In the small towns outside the big cities the chicas are hungry for excitement and pesos and they will take you dick to get the former and not demand much of the latter. Of course you have to have transportation to do that (uber does not cut it for this gentlemen no matter how hard the off-islanders want to ride the collective UBER dick up in here) and you have to speak Spanish. Period. If you don't want to put the work in to learn Spanish (and I understand why) let your pesos communicate and stay in the puta pueblos and big cities.
    Very well done post sir. It is always nice to read something well thought out from a thinking person who see's the world around us and can sense the sand shifting under one's feet. This post should be a must read for many of us. For me it hits a whole bunch of nail's right on the head.

    And unfortunately it describes a situation taking place all over the planet, including pretty much all of the 'recreation area's' many of us similar thinking folks rotate through.

    As the Commander mentions, the situation is changing. And in all to many places, all to rapidly. The New World Order is yesterday's Global Village on a potent mix of steroids and methamphetamine's. And it ain't going to stop soon, and it ain't going to end pretty I don't think.

    Folks who are getting a similar feeling need to re-evaluate their priorities and values, and expand their horizons and be willing to be creative and flexible.

    There are still very do-able options out there if one is willing to think outside of the box as they say. Last year I spent seven months having a look around East Africa and came home very impressed and will be returning again.

    Thanks for the post.

    Cheers.

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