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  1. #1037
    I have a job offer in Lima so if any mongers know anything about the La Molina neighborhood like is it safe and is there much housing there, please PM me. It is the Universidad de San Ignacio de Loyola and this is the link to the google map of the address:

    Av. La Fontana 550, La Molina. , Lima, Peru.

    https://www.google.es/maps/place/Av.+la+Fontana+550,+Distrito+de+Lima+15024,+Peru/@-12.0722628,-76.9553844,17z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x9105c6fb2086e8f1:0xe095e4c767663aa1!8m2!3d-12.0735008!4d-76.9537643

    I know the pluses and minuses of Lima so am looking for neighborhood-specific info. Thanks in advance!

  2. #1036

    Just Finishing My First Trip to Peru and Colombia

    My thanks to all the people that makes the Peru and Colombia forums great! Fantastic info here; it made my trip enjoyable and a lot easier. A lot better than the Vietnam forum in which people will not give info because "it might spoil the market" or the equally pathetic usasexguide.info's California forum (Jackson's domestic site) in which people will only give info in a trade.

    IMO, Colombian girls are cuter than Peruvian girls. Obviously, mongering in Colombia is a lot better than in Peru.

    I only know a few words in Spanish. Obviously being fluent in Spanish helps, but knowing a few phrases, having Google translate, and having money is sufficient to enjoy everything. Using Uber to go point to point is the way to go for a newbie who doesn't know Spanish.

    At the airport in Peru at the baggage claim area, there is a stall renting Claro sim cards. The sign said 6 per day for a sim rental. WTF! That is a rip off. Not sure if it that was in US dollars or Soles; either way, it is still a rip off. You can go the official Claro office, and buy a sim card for 5 Soles (you just need an ID). I paid 20 Soles for 1 Gig of data for 1 month; that also came with some bonus minutes and text. It was 30 Soles for 2 Gig. As reported in the internet, there is a Claro store at the upstairs departure level. It seems geared toward customers who plan to roam in other countries. Never checked plans / prices for Peru at that store.

    Uber is in Lima, but not available in Cusco. Easy Taxi app works in Cusco.

  3. #1035
    Quote Originally Posted by MrEnternational  [View Original Post]
    Is a local phone really needed these days? For years I had my chips in Peru, Brazil, Colombia, etc. But that was the old days. Since whatsapp came out I have had no need to maintain a balance on so many sim cards. Plus I have free intl data from my home country. If I need to actually call someone I can do a video call on whatsapp or dial the number through skype. The only sims I maintain these days are Dominican Republic and Philippines where my roaming internet can sometimes be poor, and USA and Thailand where I live.
    I could get by if I had to, but renting is not an option if you are there 3-6 months, as the cost would be insane. Plus, I like to be connected to my local friends by voice, text or WhatsApp. Hopefully there is some misinformation here. If a passport qualifies me to enter the country, I would think it qualifies me to have a sim. But then again, I use customer logic and not government logic. Buying data from my country is not an option as that would be insanely priced as well.

    I guess I could data from a reseller, but that is $50 USD a month for only 2 GB. Better than being robbed $6 USD per day over 6 months, but still far worse than loading up on data at a Metro when you need and just using apartment, bar and restaurant wifi. I tried WiGo, but that truly sucked. Maybe is better now, but I would not be optimistic.

    I guess time will tell. Worst case, I'll do without since I refuse to pay $180 USD a month to rent a sim and then pay for data on top of that.

  4. #1034

    Tourists can still rent SIM cards

    Quote Originally Posted by JackJericho  [View Original Post]
    It really doesn't make much sense. I am Peruvian so I'm more familiar with the regulations as they apply to locals, but Per is a country where tourism make an important part of the total national income so I'm sure there are some provisions for tourists. The law demands all owners of new lines to be properly identified and I think that Passports can be considered proper enough ID; all the more so since most modern passports include electronic registry of biometric characteristic, s and that is recorded by the authorities upon entering the country. What Artisttyp says makes a lot more sense to me. I'll find out at Claro, Movistar and Entel stores and report back.
    You can still borrow a sim card at the airport. It's just more expensive than using a prepaid. I think the provider was claro.

    I paid about 15 soles for the sim and another 40 soles to load it with the help of a local friend. $15 usd.

    If I was to have rented a sim for this trip from the airport it would have been 10 usd and 6 usd per day. $70 usd to rent. I saved $55 usd.

    If you are a tourist I hope you have some local friends who are willing to help you. Otherwise you will just have to suck it up and eat the cost.

  5. #1033
    Quote Originally Posted by Guerinto  [View Original Post]
    Wow! That is frigging horrible for us. So a tourist is not allowed to have a phone now? Seems pretty silly if that is the case. Clearly not thinking about tourists.
    It really doesn't make much sense. I am Peruvian so I'm more familiar with the regulations as they apply to locals, but Perú is a country where tourism make an important part of the total national income so I'm sure there are some provisions for tourists. The law demands all owners of new lines to be properly identified and I think that Passports can be considered proper enough ID; all the more so since most modern passports include electronic registry of biometric characteristic, s and that is recorded by the authorities upon entering the country. What Artisttyp says makes a lot more sense to me. I'll find out at Claro, Movistar and Entel stores and report back.

  6. #1032

    Claro Cell Phone Service

    I was in Lima last month.

    I simply walked into the Claro store in Miraflores with my passport and unlocked phone. 20 minutes later I walked out with a local number and pre paid minutes.

  7. #1031
    Quote Originally Posted by Guerinto  [View Original Post]
    Wow! That is frigging horrible for us. So a tourist is not allowed to have a phone now? Seems pretty silly if that is the case. Clearly not thinking about tourists.
    Is a local phone really needed these days? For years I had my chips in Peru, Brazil, Colombia, etc. But that was the old days. Since whatsapp came out I have had no need to maintain a balance on so many sim cards. Plus I have free intl data from my home country. If I need to actually call someone I can do a video call on whatsapp or dial the number through skype. The only sims I maintain these days are Dominican Republic and Philippines where my roaming internet can sometimes be poor, and USA and Thailand where I live.

  8. #1030
    Quote Originally Posted by JackJericho  [View Original Post]
    Law has changed because criminal bands were using improperly registered prepaid phones for extortion and other criminal activities. Some very poor, homeless, people, were found to have twenty or more prepaid phone lines to their names. Obviously some criminals were using their names. The Law now demands the identity of the owners of all new prepaid phone lines to be biometrically verified via electronic fingerprint readers against the RENIEC's on-line files. (RENIEC = National Identity and Civil Status Registry).
    Wow! That is frigging horrible for us. So a tourist is not allowed to have a phone now? Seems pretty silly if that is the case. Clearly not thinking about tourists.

  9. #1029
    Quote Originally Posted by Seraph2099  [View Original Post]
    That has changed now. Foreigners can rent a sim card at the airport for $10 usd and $6 usd a day. If you want a prepaid only a local can do that with an ID and fingerprint.
    Law has changed because criminal bands were using improperly registered prepaid phones for extortion and other criminal activities. Some very poor, homeless, people, were found to have twenty or more prepaid phone lines to their names. Obviously some criminals were using their names. The Law now demands the identity of the owners of all new prepaid phone lines to be biometrically verified via electronic fingerprint readers against the RENIEC's on-line files. (RENIEC = National Identity and Civil Status Registry).

  10. #1028

    Prepaid cards are different now

    Quote Originally Posted by Guerinto  [View Original Post]
    In 2015, all I had to do was show up at the Claro on Avenida Jose Larco, bring my unlocked phone and my passport. You get in one line, then another and you get a chip and a number there. I believe I also bought some data on the spot and after that you top up a Metro, among other places. Was pretty quick and simple for me, but then I brought a local with me just in case. I have basic Spanish.

    Hope this helps.
    That has changed now. Foreigners can rent a sim card at the airport for $10 usd and $6 usd a day. If you want a prepaid only a local can do that with an ID and fingerprint.

  11. #1027
    Quote Originally Posted by IguanaSix  [View Original Post]
    Considering a trip to Peru. Do locals need to show ID or get fingerprinted to get a cell phone and get a local number? What do foreigners need to buy a cell phone and get a local number?
    In 2015, all I had to do was show up at the Claro on Avenida Jose Larco, bring my unlocked phone and my passport. You get in one line, then another and you get a chip and a number there. I believe I also bought some data on the spot and after that you top up a Metro, among other places. Was pretty quick and simple for me, but then I brought a local with me just in case. I have basic Spanish.

    Hope this helps.

  12. #1026

    Cell phones

    Considering a trip to Peru. Do locals need to show ID or get fingerprinted to get a cell phone and get a local number? What do foreigners need to buy a cell phone and get a local number?

  13. #1025

    David Brown

    Quote Originally Posted by SamuRay  [View Original Post]
    A US guy has been busted for offering underaged girls to sex tourists, according to a paper I read. Does anyone else know anything about it? This, in Lima, Peru!
    Old news. Read the past posts.

  14. #1024

    Social websites

    Hi Folks, just a quick report. I have been checking a few websites like seekingarrangements, adultfriendfinder and badoo.

    I must say that I have got quite a good response, some 25-30% girls from seeking arrangements tend to ask more money but a few of them look very promising (one is also in AFF) girls are early twenties or late teens.

    Response in AFF is also around 30%, girls are older (30 something) but seem to be more into this for fun.

    Finally I got a couple of responses in Badoo, a 19 yo girl who looks really awesome (but not answering, may have got cold feet) and a 25 yo "promotora" who looks really slutty and was disappointed about my age but still is keen on meeting (my wallet makes up for my looks it seems).

    A couple of girls seem to be open to explore bondage. Let see.

    I got a very helpful benchmark from SlyOne and it is very likely his contacts are better than the ones I am getting, but still worth a try methinks.

  15. #1023

    What is the best way to get permanent residency in Peru (aside from marriage)

    Hi, I am have been researching naturalization in order to get a second passport in Peru. It seems that it is pretty straight forward, you can apply after 2 years of permanent residency. But, it is a little more hazy how one can get PR without marrying? I was looking at the rentista (pensioner) visa, which seems to just require proof of $1000 of passive income? It seems a little unspecific about what constitutes "proof. " But a rentista visa is a "non-working" visa? Would a rentista visa, student visa, etc all allow for a 2-year residency that would qualify one for citizenship? Does anyone here have actual experience with this, possibly know a local lawyer who can get it done? If the scuttlebutt I have seen is true then it sounds incredibly cheap, fast, and easy compared to other countries out there. Thanks!

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